Sackler Past Fellows & Lecturers

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Martin L. Albert
Dir, Medical Res. Service, Dept. of Veterans Affairs Washington, D.C., USA, malbert@bu.edu
Professor MARTIN L. ALBERT, M.D., Sackler Scholar 1995/1996. Martin L. Albert, MD, PhD, is Professor of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, Director of the Harold Goodglass Aphasia Research Center at the VA Boston Healthcare System/Boston University Medical School, and Principal Investigator of the Language in the Aging Brain Laboratory at the VA Boston Healthcare System/Boston University Medical School. He is a world-renowned specialist in cognitive neuroscience, with particular expertise in dementia, the aging brain, aphasia, and neurobehavioral consequences of head injury. He was a Senior Science Advisor to the President of the United States in the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the National Director of the Medical Research Service for the US Department of Veterans Affairs. He has been listed in "Best Doctors in America" every year since its founding. (b. 1939)
Bruce Ames
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Univ. of California, Berkeley, USA, bnames@uclink4.berkeley.edu
Professor BRUCE AMES, Sackler Scholar 1994/1995. Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at University of California, Berkeley, California, USA. Director, National Institute of Environment Health Sciences Center. Member, National Academy of Sciences and American Academy of Arts & Sciences. Recipient, General Motors Cancer Research Foundation Prize and Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement 1985, the Japan Prize 1997, the National Medal of Science 1998 and the Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal 2004. (b. 1928)
Clifford Ando

Department of Classics, University of Chicago, Illinois, USA, clifford.ando@uchicago.edu


Prof. Clifford Ando, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor and Professor of Classics, History, and Law at the University of Chicago. He is also a Research Fellow in the Department of Classics and World Languages at the University of South Africa. He specializes in the history of government, law, and religion in the Roman Empire.

Prof. Ando is the author of seven monographs, including Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2000); The Matter of the Gods (2008); Law, Language and Empire in the Roman Tradition (2011); Roman Social Imaginaries.  Language and thought in contexts of empire (2015) and Religion et gouvernement dans l'Empire romain (2016). He has also published more than 100 articles, chapters and reviews, and edited or translated another 8 books.

Prof. Ando’s first monograph won the Society for Classical Studies's Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit. He is also the recipient of a Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Prize from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He has been a Junior Fellow and a Frederick Burkhardt Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies; a Fellow of the Huntington Library; a New Directions Fellow of the Mellon Foundation; a Fellow of the Max Weber Kolleg of the University of Erfurt; and a Canterbury Fellow at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. He has held visiting positions in the Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford; the Collège de France; the École Pratique des Hautes Études; the Université Panthéon-Assas; the University of Münster; the American Academy in Rome; and the University of British Columbia.

Prof. Ando is editor of the series Empire and After, senior editor of Bryn Mawr Classical Review, and serves on the editorial boards of Classical Philology; Critical Analysis of LawL'Homme. Revue française d'anthropologie; and the Oxford Series in the History and Theory of International Law.

B
Samuel Bacharach
N.Y. State School of Industrial & Labor Relations, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, USA, Sb22@cornell.edu
Professor SAMUEL B. BACHARACH, Sackler Scholar 1990/1991. McKelvey Grant Professor in the Department of Organizational Behavior and Director, Institute for Workplace Studies & Smithers Institute, School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, U.S.A. Recipient of the National Science Foundation Prize 1979-1981 and the Smithers Foundation Prize 1989. (b. 1946)
Robert Bartlett
Dept. of Mediaeval History, Univ. of St. Andrews, Scotland, UK, jon.bartlett@path.ox.ac.uk
Professor ROBERT BARTLETT, Sackler Scholar 2000/2001. Wardlaw Professor of Mediaeval History, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, File, Scotland. Fellow, Royal Historical Society, 1986 and Alexander von Humboldt Fellow, University of Gottingen, 1988-89. Reader, British Academy, 1995-97. (b. 1950)
Martin A. Berger
History of Art and Visual Culture; University of California at Santa Cruz, USA, maberger@ucsc.edu
Professor MARTIN A BERGER, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016. Acting Dean of the Arts, History of Art and Visual Cul ture; University of California at Santa Cruz, USA (b. 1964).
Angelika Berlejung
Department of Theology, University of Leipzig, Germany and Department of Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Stellenbosch, South Africa. berlejung@uni-leipzig.de
Prof. ANGELIKA BERLEJUNG, Sackler Lecturer 2013/2014. Professor Berlejung received a diploma in Theology from the University of Heidelberg (1988) and a doctorate degree in Theology at Heidelberg (1997). She was Assistant from 1993-95 in Rostock and subsequently 1995-99 in Heidelberg. 1999 she was appointed as Professor for 'Languages and Cultures of Syria and Palestine' at the Theological Faculty of the University Leuven/Belgium. Since 2004 she is Professor for 'Old Testament: History and History of Religions of Israel and its Environment' at the Theological Faculty of the University Leipzig/Germany. In addition 2009 she was appointed as Professor extraordinaire in the Faculty of Arts (Oriental Studies) of the University Stellenbosch/South-Africa.   Prof. Berlejung was visiting professor at several Universities (Berlin 2003, Basel 2006, Stellenbosch and Pretoria 2008), she received the Ruprecht-Karls Award from the University of Heidelberg (1998), she is member of the Editorial Board of Oriental Religions in Antiquity (since 2008), and she was co-editor of the ZDPV (2008-2012). She is member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Old Testament Essays (since 2009), and editor of the book-list of the Theologischen Rundschau, Fachgebiet: Religionsgeschichte (since 2010). She was Chair of Project B7 SFB 586 (Leipzig-Halle): 'Space and Mobility in Syro-Palestine during the Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian Empires' (DFG-funding 2008-2012) and Co-Director of the Excavation at Qubur al-Walaydah/Israel (together with Prof. Gunnar Lehmann, 2008-2012). She also was member and principal investigator of the research group/Graduiertenkolleg „Religiöser Nonkonformismus und kulturelle Dynamik' in Leipzig (DFG-funding, 2009-2013). Actually she is principal investigator (together with Gunnar Lehmann) of the GIF-Project „Assyrian Border Administration and Imperial Economic Strategies in the Southern Levant: The Case of Ashdod ad Halom' (2013-2015) and prepares a new excavation project at Ashdod Yam (together with Prof. Alexander Fantalkin).
Joseph Bernstein
School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, berstei@post.tau.ac.il
Professor JOSEPH BERNSTEIN, Sackler Scholar 1991/1992. Professor of Mathematics. Since 1993, School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Previous, Department of Mathematics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Member of the Israel Academy of Sciences 2002 and National Academy of Science 2004. Recipient, Annual Prize of the Moscow Mathematical Society 1976 and Israel Prize 2004. (b. 1945)
Hans Dieter Betz
Dept. of New Testament & Early Christian Literature, Div. of Humanities, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, hansbetz@midway.uchicago.edu
Professor HANS DIETER BETZ, Sackler Scholar 1995/1996. Shailer Mathews Professor; Past Chairman, Department of New Testament and Early Christian Literature, Division of the Humanities, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Recipient, Lady Davis Fellow, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 1990. (b. 1931)
Martin Blaser, MD
The Frederick H. King Professor of Internal Medicine and Chair, NYU Langone Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York City , Martin.Blaser@nyumc.orgSandra.Fiorelli@nyumc.org
Professor MARTIN BLASER, Sackler Lecturer 2010-2011. The Frederick H. King Professor of Internal Medicine and Chair, Department of Medicine at the New York University School of Medicine since April 2000. He also is Director of Medical Services at Tisch and Bellevue Hospitals, and Professor of Microbiology. Dr. Blaser?s research has focused on bacterial pathogenesis, having worked for more than 30 years on the role of Campylobacter and Helicobacter species, among other organisms, in human disease. After early studies on the pathogenic Campylobacter species, much work since 1985 has involved the gastric bacterium H. pylori. His work linked the relation of colonization to inflammation, and to gastric cancer. His studies identified vacA and cagA, the two major virulence genes, and showed differential disease risk associated with particular alleles. Dr. Blaser developed a conceptual framework involving unique dynamic equilibria between H. pylori populations and colonized hosts, which has become a general model of persistence for co-adapted microbes. His explorations of H. pylori diversity have shown the intercontinental spread of these organisms in pre-historic times, and he is increasingly interested in the role of H. pylori and other normal microbiota in human health, including protective roles against adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, asthma, and obesity. He holds 24 US patents relating to his Campylobacter and Helicobacter research, and has authored over 460 original articles. He has received many honors for his work including the Wade Hampton Frost Award from the American Public Health Association, and the AACR-American Cancer Society Award for Research Excellence in Cancer Epidemiology. He served as President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and currently serves as Chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute, on the Advisory Board for Clinical Research of the National Institutes of Health, and on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. (b. 1948)
Juan Bonifacino
Department of Cell Biology and Metabolism, NICHD, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland, USA
Professor JUAN BONIFACINO, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Chief, Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch, NICHD, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Juan S. Bonifacino received his Ph. D. degree in Biochemistry in 1981 from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1982 he moved to the NIH where he pursued post-doctoral studies with Dr. Richard D. Klausner. He rose through the ranks and in 1997 he became the Chief of the Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch at the NIH. Throughout his career, Dr. Bonifacino has been interested in the molecular mechanisms that determine protein localization and fate in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Since the early 1990s, Dr. Bonifacino's group at the NIH has conducted research on signals and adaptor proteins that mediate protein sorting to endosomes and lysosomes. His group discovered new sorting signals and adaptor proteins (i.e., AP-1B, AP-3, AP-4, GGAs), and elucidated the mechanisms by which these function. In addition, Dr. Bonifacino applied the knowledge gained from these studies to the elucidation of the causes of various human diseases including Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 and autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease. His work has been published in over 190 scholarly articles. Dr. Bonifacino serves or has served as associate editor of the journals Developmental Cell, Molecular Cell and Molecular Biology of the Cell, and editorial board member of The Journal of Cell Biology, The Journal of Biological Chemistry and Traffic. He is also the co-editor of the books Current Protocols in Cell Biology and Short Protocols in Cell Biology. He has served as a member of the Council of the American Society for Cell Biology and chaired numerous scientific conferences. He has delivered the Alex Novikoff, Leo Satz and George Connell lectures, and is an NIH Distinguished Investigator and Honorary Professor of Biological Chemistry at the University of Buenos Aires. His lab has trained over 70 post-doctoral fellows and students, most whom have pursued careers in academic research.
Stanley J. Brodsky
Professor of Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA, USA, sjbth@slac.stanford.edu
Professor STANLEY J. BRODSKY, Sackler Lecturer, 2005/2006. Education: B.S., 1961, Physics; Ph.D., 1964, University of Minnesota. Professional Academic History: Research Associate, Columbia University, 1964-1966; Research Associate, SLAC, Stanford, 1966-1968; Permanent Staff, Theoretical Physics, SLAC, Stanford, 1968-1975; Associate Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1975-1976; Professor, SLAC, Stanford, 1976-present; Head Theoretical Physics Group, SLAC, 1996-2002. Awards and Honors: Visiting Professor, Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, 1982; AVCO Visiting Professor, Cornell University, 1985; Foreign Scientific Member and External Scientific Director, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, 1989-present; Alexander von Humboldt Distinguished U.S. Senior Scientist Award, 1987; Fellow, American Physical Society; Associate Editor, Nuclear Physics B and Nuclear Physics B Proceedings Supplements; Member, Editorial Board, Progress in Particle and Nuclear Physics; President and Co-Founder of the International Light-Cone Advisory Committee; International Advisory Committee, International Workshops on Photon-Photon Collisions; Member, Program Advisory Committee, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2003-present. Visiting Professor, Physics Department, College of William and Mary, 2003; Distinguished Fellow at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory, 2003. Member, Program Advisory Committee, Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany 2004-present. (b. 1939)
Henri Berestycki

Chair, Mathematical Analysis and Modelling, L’École des hautes études en sciences sociales, PSL Research University, Paris, France, hb@ehess.fr


Prof. Henri Berestycki, Sackler Scholar 2016/2017, 2017/2018, is professor of "classe exceptionnelle", chair of Mathematical analysis and modelling (since 2001) at EHESS (École des hautes études en sciences sociales), Paris, and Dean of Research, PSL Research University, Paris. His current research interests include non-linear partial differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, mathematical models in biology and especially in ecology, and modelling in social sciences, in particular, the study of financial markets, urban planning, criminology, and the dynamics of riots. Recently he obtained two major grants: the FRG NSF grant in the USA (2011-2014), DMS-1065971, with Luis Cafarelli, Yanyan Li, Fanghua Lin and Luis Silvestre for activities based at the University of Chicago (awarded to H. Berestycki and L. Silvestre), and the European ERC advanced ("Senior") grant 2013-2018, project "ReaDi", Reaction-Diffusion Equations, Propagation and Modelling.

 

Prof. Berestycki has received a number of honors for his work: Prize Carrière (1988) and prize Sophie Germain (2004) from the Académie des Sciences Paris, the Humboldt Award from the Humboldt Foundation, Germany (2004), the Knight of the Legion of Honor (Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur) (2010), he is also a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society (2012) and a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2013).

 

Prof. Berestycki is the author of over 140 articles in international scientific journals, and currently serves as an Editorial Board member of: Analysis in Theory and Applications, Annales de l'Institut Henri Poincaré – Analyse non linéaire, Annali di Matematica Pura ed Aplicata, Communications in Contemporary Mathematics, Journal of Differential Equations, Networks and Inhomogeneous Media.

Leora Batnitzky

Chair, Department of Religion Princeton University, New Jersey, USA, batnitzk@Princeton.edu


Prof. Leora Batnitzky, Sackler Fellow 2017/2018, is Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Jewish Studies and Professor and Chair of Religion at Princeton University.  She received a B.A. in philosophy from Barnard College, Columbia University, a second B.A. in Bible from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, and an M.A. and PhD. in Religion from Princeton University.  She joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1997 and has been a visiting researcher at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, New York University Law School, and the University of Tokyo.

 

Prof. Batnitzky has received grants and fellowships from the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and the Hauser Program in Global Law at NYU law school.  She is the author of over sixty articles and book chapters, and has published three books: Idolatry and Representation: The Philosophy of Franz Rosenzweig Reconsidered (Princeton University Press, 2000), Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas: Philosophy and the Politics of Revelation (Cambridge University Press, 2006), and How Judaism Became a Religion: An Introduction to Modern Jewish Thought (Princeton University Press, 2011).

 

​Prof. Batnitzky is co-editor of three volumes: The Book of Job: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Hermeneutics (De Gruyter, 2014), Jewish Legal Theories (Brandeis University Press, 2017) and Instituting Rights and Religion (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and has co-edited the journal Jewish Studies Quarterly since 2004.  She has lectured throughout the United States, Europe, Israel and Asia.  Her current research focuses on conversion controversies in Israel and India as they relate to current global debates about religious freedom.

Pavel Belov

Dean, Physics and Engineering Faculty; Head, International Research Centre, for Nanophotonics and Metamaterials; National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg, Russia, belov@metalab.ifmo.ru

 


Prof. Pavel Belov, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is the Dean of Physics and Engineering Faculty, Head of Nanophotonics and Metamaterials Department, and Leading Research Fellow of St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Russia. He received BS, MS, PhD and DSc (Habilitation) degrees from ITMO University, Russia in 1998, 2000, 2003 and 2010, respectively, and PhD from Helsinki University of Technology in 2006.



Prof. Belov's research interests include analytical and numerical modeling of metamaterials, photonic and electromagnetic crystals, artificial dielectrics and magnetics, as well as microwave, terahertz and optical sub-wavelength imaging using the metematerials. He is an expert in the areas of Nanophotonics, Metamaterials and Antenna Engineering. Prof. Belov is the author of 13 book chapters, more than 200 reports at international conferences and he co-authored more than 300 papers in scientific journals. He was awarded by prestigious EPSRC Advanced Research Fellowship and served as PI of more than 15 research grants.



Prof. Belov was awarded the Russian Federation President's Prize in Science and Innovation for Young Scientists (2009). This is the highest recognition of young researchers in Russia. The award was personally presented by President of Russian Federation, Dmitry A. Medvedev. He is also a holder of IET Achievement Award (IET, UK, 2006); International Dennis Gabor Award (Novofer foundation, Hungary, 2003) [The award is granted every 3 years to one outstanding foreign researcher. The award was personally presented by Prime Minister of Hungary, Péter Medgyessy]; URSI Young Scientist Award (Belgium, 2002).

 

Stephen Blaclow

Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor; Chair, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, Massachusetts, USA. stephen_blacklow@hms.harvard.edu


Prof. Stephen C. Blacklow, Sackler Scholar 2018/2019, is currently the Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, and a member of the Department of Cancer Biology at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Prof. Blacklow received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1991, completed his residency in Clinical Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and carried out postdoctoral research at the Whitehead Institute with Prof. Peter S. Kim. His initial faculty appointment was at Stanford University in 1996, where he remained until rejoining the HMS faculty at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1998.

 

Research led by Prof. Blacklow’s team has shown how cell surface receptors can convey a developmental signal directly from one contacting cell surface to the next and then from the membrane to the nucleus. He has elucidated key molecular events in Notch signal transduction, a conserved cell-cell communication system that influences cell fate decisions in all metazoan organisms, and that is frequently hijacked as an oncogenic driver in human leukemia. His laboratory uncovered how activating mutations of the Notch1 receptor frequently found in human T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma overcome normal restraints on signaling resulting in autonomous gain-of-function, and spurred the development of inhibitory antibodies that suppress normal and oncogenic Notch signaling as candidates for further clinical development.

 

Prof. Blacklow was named a Pfizer Scholar in 1997, a Pew Scholar in 1999, and an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association in 2002. He has given research presentations at numerous national and international meetings, including plenary talks at Keystone Symposia and the inaugural Murray Goodman Symposium of the American Chemical Society. Prof. Blacklow directed the MD-PhD Program in Basic and Translational Sciences at Harvard Medical School from 2007-2012, and has served on Advisory Committees for pre-clinical departments, graduate programs, and MD-PhD programs at several major research universities and institutions, including Stanford, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Stephen Blaclow

Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor; Chair, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Harvard Medical School
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology
Massachusetts, USA
Email: stephen_blacklow@hms.harvard.edu


Prof. Stephen C. Blacklow, Sackler Scholar 2018/2019, is currently the Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor and Chair of the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, and a member of the Department of Cancer Biology at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Prof. Blacklow received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1991, completed his residency in Clinical Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and carried out postdoctoral research at the Whitehead Institute with Prof. Peter S. Kim. His initial faculty appointment was at Stanford University in 1996, where he remained until rejoining the HMS faculty at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in 1998.

 

Research led by Prof. Blacklow’s team has shown how cell surface receptors can convey a developmental signal directly from one contacting cell surface to the next and then from the membrane to the nucleus. He has elucidated key molecular events in Notch signal transduction, a conserved cell-cell communication system that influences cell fate decisions in all metazoan organisms, and that is frequently hijacked as an oncogenic driver in human leukemia. His laboratory uncovered how activating mutations of the Notch1 receptor frequently found in human T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma overcome normal restraints on signaling resulting in autonomous gain-of-function, and spurred the development of inhibitory antibodies that suppress normal and oncogenic Notch signaling as candidates for further clinical development.

 

Prof. Blacklow was named a Pfizer Scholar in 1997, a Pew Scholar in 1999, and an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association in 2002. He has given research presentations at numerous national and international meetings, including plenary talks at Keystone Symposia and the inaugural Murray Goodman Symposium of the American Chemical Society. Prof. Blacklow directed the MD-PhD Program in Basic and Translational Sciences at Harvard Medical School from 2007-2012, and has served on Advisory Committees for pre-clinical departments, graduate programs, and MD-PhD programs at several major research universities and institutions, including Stanford, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Pavel Belov

Dean, Physics and Engineering Faculty; Head, International Research Centre for Nanophotonics and Metamaterials;
National Research University of Information, Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO) St. Petersburg, Russia. belov@metalab.ifmo.ru


Prof. Pavel Belov, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is the Dean of Physics and Engineering Faculty, Head of Nanophotonics and Metamaterials Department, and Leading Research Fellow of St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Russia. He received BS, MS, PhD and DSc (Habilitation) degrees from ITMO University, Russia in 1998, 2000, 2003 and 2010, respectively, and PhD from Helsinki University of Technology in 2006.

 

Prof. Belov's research interests include analytical and numerical modeling of metamaterials, photonic and electromagnetic crystals, artificial dielectrics and magnetics, as well as microwave, terahertz and optical sub-wavelength imaging using the metematerials. He is an expert in the areas of Nanophotonics, Metamaterials and Antenna Engineering. Prof. Belov is the author of 13 book chapters, more than 200 reports at international conferences and he co-authored more than 300 papers in scientific journals. He was awarded by prestigious EPSRC Advanced Research Fellowship and served as PI of more than 15 research grants.

 

Prof. Belov was awarded the Russian Federation President's Prize in Science and Innovation for Young Scientists (2009). This is the highest recognition of young researchers in Russia. The award was personally presented by President of the Russian Federation, Dmitry A. Medvedev. He is also a holder of IET Achievement Award (IET, UK, 2006); International Dennis Gabor Award (Novofer foundation, Hungary, 2003) [The award is granted every 3 years to one outstanding foreign researcher. The award was personally presented by the Prime Minister of Hungary, Péter Medgyessy]; URSI Young Scientist Award (Belgium, 2002).

C
Jenny Strauss Clay
Department of Classics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. jsc2t@virginia.edu
Prof JENNY STRAUSS CLAY, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Classics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA.
Carolyn Pape Cowan
Department of Psychology, University of California at Berkeley, USA, ccowan@uclink.berkeley.edu
Adjunct Professor CAROLYN PAPE COWAN, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006, Professor of Psychology, University of California at Berkeley. Member Board of Directors, Council on Contemporary Families since 1997; Advisory Board, Giving Presence: Oral History project for mothers with invasive breast cancer since 1996. Editorial Review Board: Family Relations, Journal of Family Psychology from 1996-1998; Regular Ad Hoc Reviewer: Child Development; Developmental Psychology, Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Journal of Infant Mental Health, and Merrill Palmer Quarterly
Elton Cairns
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Professor ELTON CAIRNS, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Professor of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California and Faculty Senior Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He has conducted research and held management positions at the General Electric Research Laboratory. Argonne National Laboratory, General Motors Research Laboratories, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, (Associate Lab Director and Director, Energy & Environment Division). prof. Cairns received his education in chemistry and chemical engineering at the Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan, and the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Cairns has contributed more than 240 publications and 15 patents in the areas of electrochemical kinetics, batteries, fuel cells, molten salts, liquid metals, thermodynamics, surface chemistry, catalysis, transport phenomena, Dr. Cairns co-authored with Dr. H.A. Liebhafsky (Texas A&M) a book entitled ''Fuel Cells and Fuel Batteries''. He has received a number of awards for his research contri-butions, and has served as president of The Electrochemical Society, and the International Society of Electrochemistry. He has also served as an editor of the Journal of the Electro-chemical Society and Electrochimica Acta. He has organized and chaired a number of national and international meetings and symposia on electrochemistry, energy conversion, and related topics. He has served as consultant to a number of national and international corporations, and Expert Witness in several patent infringement trials. His current research includes lithium ion cells, lithium/sulfur cells, and electrocatalysts for fuel cells.
Federico Capasso
Robert Wallace Professor of Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, capasso@seas.harvard.edu
Prof. FEDERICO CAPASSO, Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is the Robert Wallace Professor of Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University since 2003 and Adjunct Researcher, Institute for Quantum Studies, Texas A&M University since 2009. Previously Vice President of Physical Research, Bell Laboratories Lucent Technology, Bell Lab Fellow and other management positions totaling 27 years. He received his PhD in 1973, University of Rome, Italy. His research has spanned basic science and applications in the areas of electronics, photonics, nanoscale science and technology including plasmonics, metamaterials and the Casimir effect. He pioneered banstructure engineering of artificially structured materials and devices and is a co-inventor of the quantum cascade laser. He recently performed the first measurement of the repulsive Casimir force he and his group invented a new class of plasmonic devices for near-field and far-field control and recently discovered powerful generalizations of the laws of reflection and refraction applicable to metasurfaces and used to design and demonstrate a new class of flat optical components. Memberships include: National Academy of Sciences 1995, National Academy of Engineering 1995 and Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences 1998. Awards include: King Faisal International Prize for Science 2005, Arthur Schawlow Prize in Laser Science, American Physical Society 2004. Wetherill Medal, Franklin Institute 1997, Edison Medal, IEEE 2004. Gold Medal, International Society of Optics and Photonics (SPIE) 2013, European Physical Society Quantum Electronics Prize, Berthold Leibinger Zukunftspreis (the future prize) 2010. Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics, Jan Czochralski Award, European Material Research Society for lifetime achievements in Materials Science IEEE David Sarnoff Award in Electronics 1991, IEEE/LEOS Streifer Award 1998, Robert Wood Prize, Optical Society of America 2001, Rank Prize in Optoelectronics 1998, Material Research Society Medal 1995, Welker Medal 1994, Duddell Medal and Prize, Institute of Physics, London, UK 2002, Newcomb Cleveland Prize, American Association for the Advancement of Science 1995, ''Vinci of Excellence'' LMVH Prize 1995 and the New York Academy of Sciences Award 1993.
David Chandler
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, USA, chandler@cchem.berkeley.edu
Professor DAVID CHANDLER, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Bruce Mahan Professor of Chemistry at the University of California at Berkeley. He received his S.B. degree in Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1966, and his Ph.D. in Chemical Physics at Harvard in1969. He began his academic career as an Assistant Professor in 1970 at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois, rising through the ranks to become a full Professor in 1977. Prior to joining the Berkeley faculty in 1986, Chandler spent two years as Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. Chandler's primary area of research is statistical mechanics. His most significant contributions include the development of the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen theory, generally regarded as the basic equilibrium theory of the liquid state, and the Pratt-Chandler theory of hydrophobic effects. Chandler has also created many of the basic techniques with which condensed matter chemical equilibrium and chemical dynamics are understood with molecular theory. His most recent works focus on dynamics and structure far from equilibrium, including processes of self assembly and also the glass transition. His honors include the Hildebrand, 1989, and Theoretical Chemistry, 1996 Awards from the American Chemical Society the Irving Langmuir Chemical Physics Prize from the American Physical Society, 2005 the Bourke, 1985 and Lennard-Jones Lectureships, 2001 from the Royal Society of Chemistry the Hinshelwood Lectureship from the University of Oxford, 1993 the Hirshfelder Prize from the University of Wisconsin, 1998 Muliken Prize from the University of Chicago, 2000 election to the National Academy of Sciences, 1995 and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995. (b. 1944)
Alexandre Chorin
Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Professor ALEXANDRE J. CHORIN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 2003/2004. Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley. Head, Mathematics Department, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1986-1995; Director, Center for Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley from 1980-82 and 1995 to the present. Recipient of the Norbert Wiener Prize of the American Mathematical Society and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, 2000 and an honorary D.Sc. from the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, 2003; and the University of California Professor award. He is known for his contributions to the field of Computational fluid dynamics and developed the "Artificial compressibility method" and the popular "Projection method". (b. 1938)
Mark R. Cohen
The Khedouri A. Zilkha Prof. of Jewish Civilization in the Near East and Prof. of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University, USA, mrcohen@princeton.edu
Prof. MARK R. COHEN, Sackler Scholar 2011/2012. Educated at Brandeis University (B.A.), Columbia University (M.A.), and the Jewish Theological Seminary (M.H.L., Rabbi, Ph.D.), he is a well known historian of the Jews in Arab lands in the Middle Ages. His publications include over 100 articles and reviews and several books: Jewish Self-Government in Medieval Egypt, 1980, which won the National Jewish Book Award for Jewish history, 1981 Al-mujtama' al-yahudi fi Misr al-islamiyya fi al-'usur al-wusta (Jewish Life in Medieval Egypt 641-1382), a survey, translated into Arabic, for readers in the Arab world, 1987 The Autobiography of a Seventeenth-Century Venetian Rabbi: Leon Modena's "Life of Judah,” 1988 Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages, 1994, new edition 2008, which has been translated into Hebrew, Turkish, German, Arabic, French, and Romanian (Spanish forthcoming), Poverty and Charity in the Jewish Community of Medieval Egypt and The Voice of the Poor in the Middle Ages: An Anthology of Documents from the Cairo Geniza, published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Since 1986 he has been the director of the Princeton Geniza Project, an on-line database of transcriptions of documents from the Cairo Geniza.   Prof. Cohen has been a Lady Davis Visiting Prof. at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1982-1983) and a Fellow of its Institute for Advanced Studies (1992-93). He was a guest lecturer in the Department of Hebrew Language and Culture at Ain Shams University in Cairo (December 1993). He was a Visiting Prof. at the Hebrew University in 1996-1997, and in June of that year taught a seminar at the Free University in Berlin. In 2004 he directed a summer university course at the Central European University in Budapest and in 2005 and 2006, co-directed a summer institute sponsored by a consortium of institutes of advanced studies in the United States and Europe. He has held a Guggenheim Fellowship (1996-1997), a Fellowship at the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin (2002-2003), a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (2007-2008), has been a Visiting Scholar at the National Humanities Center (2008), where he also directed a DuPont Seminar for College Teachers on "Islam” at the National Humanities Center (June 2009). He is a member of the American Academy for Jewish Research. In 2010 he was the first winner of the Goldziher Prize for scholarship promoting better understanding between Jews and Muslims, awarded by Merrimack College's Center for the Study of Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations. Prof. Cohen has lectured widely in the U.S., Europe, Russia, Japan, Qatar, Egypt, and Israel, before both scholarly and general audiences.
Richard J. Cohen, M.D.
Whitaker Professor in Biomedical Engineering, Health Science & Technology Division, Harvard University MIT, USA, rjcohen@mit.edu
Professor Richard Cohen, Professor Richard Cohen, Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Whitaker Professor in Biomedical Engineering, Harvard University - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) since 1979 and Associate Physician, Brigham and Women?s Hospital since 1984. He is currently Co-Director of the Biomedical Enterprise Program of HST and the MIT Sloan School of Management, for ten years he directed the HST Center for Biomedical Engineering and for eight years he was Team Leader of the Cardiovascular Alterations Team of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute. Prof. Cohen?s research involves the application of physics and engineering to solving problems in biology and medicine, particularly in the cardiovascular area. His work ranges from computer simulations to animal studies to clinical investigations. Prof. Cohen is a Fellow, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering since 2000 and has published approximately 250 scientific papers and has had 25 patents issued
Shaye Cohen
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of Harvard University, USA
Professor SHAYE COHEN, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Littauer Professor of Hebrew Literature and Philosophy in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of Harvard University. Before arriving at Harvard in July 2001, Prof. Cohen was the Samuel Ungerleider Professor of Judaic Studies and Professor of Religious Studies at Brown University. Prof. Cohen began his career at the Jewish Theological Seminary where he was ordained and for many years was the Dean of the Graduate School and Shenkman Professor of Jewish History. He is perhaps best known for his From the Maccabees to the Mishnah (1987, second edition 2006), which is widely used as a textbook in colleges and adult education. More recently he is the author of The Beginnings of Jewishness (1999) and Why aren?t Jewish Women Circumcised? Gender and Covenant in Judaism (2005) which won a National Jewish Book Award. He has also appeared on educational television, including "From Jesus to Christ" and "Nova" on PBS and "Mysteries of the Bible"on A&E. He and his wife Miriam May are the parents of Ava, Jonathan, Ezra, and Hannah. (b. 1948).
Philip A. Cowan
Professor of Psychology, Institute of Human Development, University of California at Berkeley, USA, pcowan@socrates.berkeley.edu
Professor PHILIP A. COWAN, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Professor of Psychology, Institute of Human Development, University of California at Berkeley, California. Director of the Institute of Human Development, 1998-2003. Fellow, American Psychological Society since 1998; Board Member, Council on Contemporary Families since 1997. Member of Editorial Boards: Family Process since 1996, Journal of Family Psychology since 1997 and Contributing Editor, Child Magazine since 1997. Continuous funding of NIMH Research Grant - Enhancing family relationships: Child and Teen Outcomes, Principal Investigator (Co-PI with Carolyn Pape Cowan), 1979-2005; Distinguished Contribution to Family Systems Research, from the American Family Therapy Academy (AFTA) with Carolyn Cowan, 1999. (b. 1937)
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Julian Davies
, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada jed@interchange.ubc.ca
Professor JULIAN DAVIES, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1987/1988. Present position: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Past Head, Microbial Engineering Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France. Recipient of the Hoechst-Roussel and Thom Awards; and Honorary Doctor of Science, McGill University, 2011. Member of the American Society for Microbiology, 1986 and the Royal Society of Canada, 1996. (b. 1932)
David Donoho
Statistics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA, donoho@stat.stanford.edu
Professor DAVID L. DONOHO, Sackler Scholar 2000/2001. Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Humanities and Sciences, Statistics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Member, U.S.A. National Academy of Sciences, 1998 and American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1992. Recipient of Presidents' Award, Committee of Presidents and Statistical Societies, 1984 and Von Neumann Prize, Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, 2001. (b. 1957)
Valery M. Dubin
Logic Technology Development, Interl Corp., Hillsboro, Oregon, USA, valery.m.dubin@intel.com
Doctor VALERY M. DUBIN Senior Principal Engineer, Engineering Manager, Components Research, Technology and Manufacturing Group, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA since 2004. Member of the Scientific Advisory Board, CCMC, UNM, Penn State, Rutgers University since 2003 and Member of the Scientific Advisory Board, NSEC, Columbia University since 2005. Recipient of the Intel Divisional and TMG Excellence Awards in 2000, the Dr. Cho Outstanding Achievement Award in 2002, and the Intel Achievement Award in 2003. (b. 1956)
Martin Dworkin
Dept. of Microbiology, Medical School, University of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, martin@lenti.med.umn.edu
Professor MARTIN DWORKIN, Sackler Scholar 1991/1992. Professor of Microbiology, Medical School, University of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. Recipient of the John S. Guggenheim Fellow 1978/1979. Fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1997. (b. 1927)
Eugene Dynkin
Dept. of Math., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, USA, ebd1@cornell.edu
Professor EUGENE DYNKIN, Sackler Scholar 1983/1984. Department of Mathematics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. Recipient of Moscow Math. Society Prize 1947. and Leroy P. Steele Prize for Lifetime Achievements 1993. (b. 1924)
Igor Dzyaloshinskii
L. D. Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Moscow, USSR.
Professor IGOR DZYALOSHINSKII, L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow, USSR. Presently Professor Emeritus, Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California at Irvine, USA. Honors: L. D. Landau Prize 1989; American Academy of Arts & Sciences, Member 1991, American Physical Society, Fellow 1996; American Association for the Advancement of Science, Fellow 2002.
Alex Dalgarno
Harvard University and Physicist, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, adalgarno@cfa.harvard.edu
Professor ALEX DALGARNO, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1995/1996. Phillips Professor of Astronomy, Harvard University and Physicist, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Fellow of the Royal Society of London. Member of the Royal Irish Academy, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the United States National Academy of Sciences. Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society, the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science, and of the International Academy of Astronautics. Recipient of the Annual Medal of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science, the Hodgkins Medal of the Smithsonian Institution, the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society 1986, the Meggers Award of the Optical Society of America 1986, the Spiers Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Fleming Medal of the American Geophysical Union, the Davisson-Germer Award of the American Physical Society, and the Hughes Medal of the Royal Society. In 1998, Asteroid 6941 was named Asteroid Dalgarno. (b. 1928)
Stanislas Dehaene
Holds the Chair of Experimental Cognitive Psychology at the Collége de France, Paris. He directs the INSERM-CEA Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit at NeuroSpin in Saclay, south of Paris -- France's advanced neuroimaging research center stanislas.dehaene@gmail.com
Prof. STANISLAS DEHAENE, Sackler Scholar 2013/2014, holds the Chair of Experimental Cognitive Psychology at the Collége de France, Paris. He directs the INSERM-CEA Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit at NeuroSpin in Saclay, south of Paris -- France's advanced neuroimaging research center. His research investigates the neural bases of human cognitive functions such as reading, calculation and language, with a particular interest for the differences between conscious and non-conscious processing. His main research findings include the discovery of automatic links between numbers and space, and of the role of the intraparietal sulcus in number sense, the operation of the ''visual word form area'', a left occipito-temporal region which acquires the visual component of reading and the identification of physiological responses unique to conscious processing, supporting the theory of a ''global neuronal workspace'' for consciousness.   He is the author of ''The number sense'' (1997/2010) and ''Reading in the brain'' (2009), and the editor of ''The cognitive neuroscience of consciousness'' (2001) and ''From monkey brain to human brain'' (2007). He is a member of the US Academy of Science, British Academy, French Academy of Science, Pontifical Academy of Sciences, American Philosophical Society, and Academia Europae. He is recipient of The Brain Prize 2014. Roger de Spoelberch Prize, 2013. Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize in Cognitive Science, 2008. Louis D. Prize, Institut de France (with D. Le Bihan), 2003. Jean-Louis Signoret Prize, IPSEN Foundation, 2001 and James S. McDonnell Centennial Fellowship, 1999. (b. 1965, France). He is a member of the French and US Academies of Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and the recipient of the Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize in Cognitive Science (2009) and the McDonnell Centennial Award (1999). (b. 1965)
Prof. Raymond Gene de Vries
Professor Bioethics Program, Department of Medical Education, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan rdevries@med.umich.edu
Prof. RAYMOND GENE DE VRIES, Sackler Lecturer 2011-2012, joined the Bioethics Program and the Department of Medical Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan in 2006. He is also a member of the School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, where he was in residence 2003-2004, and was a Senior Fellow, Center for Bioethics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1999-2005. His main area of research is the emergence and influence of the new interdiscipline of bioethics. He is studying the social and cultural conditions that gave rise to this area of inquiry and that continue to shape the organization and influence of bioethics in medicine and medical research. As part of that project he is doing research on the development of new ways to integrate ethics with translational research, the ethics of surrogate consent for dementia research, the empirical reality of the "therapeutic misconception,” the export of bioethical ideas from the developed to the developing world, and the difficulties - ethical and otherwise - of international scientific collaborations. He also has done extensive research on the organization of maternity care. He is a member of several professional societies including the American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities, The Hastings Center, and the American Sociological Association. He is author of A Pleasing Birth: Midwifery and Maternity Care in the Netherlands. (Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2004, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2005) and co-editor of Qualitative Methods in Health Research, (London and Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2010), The view from here: Social Science and Bioethics (London: Blackwell, 2006), and Birth by Design (London: Routledge, 2001). His articles have appeared in Nature, the Hastings Center Report, the Journal of Law Medicine and Ethics, Academic Medicine, the Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Tijdschrift voor Gezondheidszorg en Ethiek, Bioethics, and he has published opinion pieces in the Wall Street Journal, the Christian Science Monitor, and the New York Times. Prof. De Vries received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis, in Sociology in 1981.
Anna Dominiczak
Regius Professor of Medicine and BHF Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine; Head of Division, Cardiovascular & Medical Sciences and Director, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow ad7e@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
Professor ANNA DOMINICZAK, OBE, MD, FRCP, FRSE, FAHA, FMedSci, Sackler Lecturer 2010-2011. A Regius Professor of Medicine and a British Heart Foundation Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine; Head of Division of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences; and Director, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. She is also a Consultant Physician and Endocrinologist at the Western Infirmary and Associate Dean for Research at the Faculty of Medicine. She has a major research interest in cardiovascular genomics and systems medicine and holds a BHF Programme Grant. ''Genomics and proteomics of hypertension and its vascular complications: the pathwayomic strategies.'' Her total research income in the last 3 years is in excess of £35 million. She is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, the Academy of Medical Sciences, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the American Heart Association. In addition to membership of several editorial boards, Professor Dominiczak was Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Science between 2004 and 2008 and in 2009 had been invited to serve as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Hypertension. Her scientific and clinical contributions have been recognised by invitations to serve on the Medical Research Council Physiological Medicine Board, British Heart Foundation Project Grant Committee, the Wellcome Trust Physiological Science Committee and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Leducq Foundation. Professor Dominiczak is an author of 247 publications in peer-reviewed journals. In 2005 she was awarded OBE for services to medicine. (b. 1954)
Christopher Dobson

John Humphrey Plummer Professor of Chemical and Structural Biology;  Master of St John's College Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, England, cmd44@cam.ac.uk


Prof. Christopher M. Dobson, ScD, FRS, FMedSci, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is the John Humphrey Plummer Professor of Chemical and Structural Biology at the University of Cambridge, and Master of St John’s College. He was an undergraduate, graduate student and research fellow at the University of Oxford. He then became an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University before returning to Oxford where he was a Professor of Chemistry until moving to Cambridge in 2001. His research activities are primarily concerned with discovering the fundamental origins of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, with the objective of identifying new strategies for their prevention or treatment.



Prof. Dobson  has published over 750 papers and review articles, and is Director of the Cambridge Centre for Misfolding Diseases and a Founder of Wren Pharmaceuticals. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Academy of Medical Sciences, and a Foreign Associate of the US National Academy of Sciences. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Davy Medal and the Royal Medal of the Royal Society, the Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Feltrinelli International Prize for Medicine of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei in Rome.

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Werner Eck
Roman History, Institut fur Altertumskunde, Alte Geschichte, Univ. zu Koln, Germany, Werner.Eck@uni-koeln.de
Professor Dr. WERNER ECK, Sackler Scholar 1999/2000. Professor of History (best known Roman historian and epigraphist in Germany), Institute of Ancient Art and History, University of Köln, Germany.Recipient Max Planck Research Award for the Humanities, 2000 and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Fellow, 2001-present; ; and Prize Ausonius 2011. Honorary Doctor: University of Kassel, 2007; and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 2008. Honorary Member Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies, 2011. (b. 1939). (b. 1939).
Samuel Edwards
Dept. of Physics, University of Cambridge, UK, Sfe11@phy.cam.ac.uk
Professor Sir SAMUEL EDWARDS, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1992/93 - 1994/1995. Cavendish Professor of Physics, University of Cambridge, England. Member of Council AFRC 1991 - present, Fachbeirat of the MPI fur Polymerforchung 1989 - present. Foreign Member of the National Academy of Science 1996. Recipient of the Boltzmann Medal, International Union of Pure and Applied Physics 1995; Royal Medal, Royal Society 2001; Dirac Medal, International Centre for Theoretical Physics 2005; and Honorary Doctor of Science, Tel Aviv University, 2006. (b. 1928)
Michael Elowitz
Professor of Biology, Bioengineering and Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology and HHMI, Pasadena, CA, USA. melowitz@caltech.edu
Prof. MICHAEL ELOWITZ, Sackler Scholar 2015/2016, Investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Professor of Biology, Biological Engineering and Applied Physics at Caltech.
Haim Eshed
Israel Space Agency, Projects Management.
Professor HAIM ESHED, Past Sackler Institute Member, 1984. Israel Space Agency, Projects Management. Awarded the Israeli Defence Award for Technological Achievements on three occasions, plus a special ten-year award. Head of the Defense Ministry?s Space Program (b. 1933)
Richard Eisenberg
Tracy H. Harris Professor of Chemistry Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, USA, eisenberg@chem.rochester.edu
Professor RICHARD EISENBERG, Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Tracy H. Harris Professor of Chemistry, Rochester, Rochester, New York since 1996; Chair, Department of Chemistry from 1991-94 and Associate Dean, College of Arts and Science from 1989-91. He was in Israel in 1997 as the Varon Visiting Professor, Weizmann Institute and Lady Davis Fellow, Hebrew University. Member, Editorial Advisory Board, Inorganic Chemistry, 1997-'98; Editorial Advisory Board, Organometallics, 1998-'00; Editor-in-Chief, Inorganic Chemistry, 2001-present. Recipient: ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry, 2003; ACS Committee on Science, 2003-2005; Rochester ACS Section Award, 2003; and Cleveland ACS Section Morley Medal, 2007. Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2005. Research interests include: homogeneous catalysis; organometallic compounds of the platinum group elements; photochemistry of platinum group element complexes; solar energy conversion and artifical photosynthesis; bond activation and oxidative addition; parahydrogen induced polarization; metal hydrides; structure-function relationships in catalytic systems. (b. 1943).
Thomas Elsaesser
Department of Media and Culture, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, elsaesser@uva.nl
Professor THOMAS ELSAESSER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 2003/2004. Professor of Visual Culture, Department of Media and Culture, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Professor II at the University of Bergen, Norway, Department of Media Studies, 1993-1999. Professor Associate at the Hochschule f?r Gestaltung and ZKM, Karlsruhe since 1997. Executive Board Member of the Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis and General Editor of the series Film Culture in Transition, published by Amsterdam University Press. Recipient of the Jay Leyda Prize, NYU; the Nancy Kovacs Singer Prize, USC. and the Ingmar Bergman Professorship, Stockholm University 2005. (b. 1943)
Francois Englert
Departement de Physique de l'Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgique, fenglert@ulb.ac.be
Professor FRANCOIS ENGLERT, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1984/1985 and Past Sackler Institute Member from Years 1988/89 - 1990/91. Departement de Physique de l'Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgique. Laureat du Prix de Sciences Mathematiques et Physiques de l'Academie Royale de Belgique 1977; First Award of the International Gravity Contest 1978 (with R. Brout and E. Gunzig); Prix Franqui 1982; High Energy and Particle Physics Prize of the European Physical Society 1997 (with R. Brout and P.W. Higgs); Wolf Prize 2004 (with R. Brout and P.W. Higgs); Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 (with P.W. Higgs) for "the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider."   . Prof. Englert, now professor emeritus, has been affiliated with the Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy since 1984, when he was invited as a Fellow of the Mortimer & Raymond Sackler Institute of Advanced Studies, and is currently a Raymond and Beverly Sackler Senior Professor by Special Appointment at the school through 2015. (b. 1932)
Gøsta Esping-Andersen

Department of Political and Social Sciences, University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, gosta.esping@upf.edu


Prof. Gøsta Esping-Andersen, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is professor of Sociology at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, where he directs the DEMOSOC research unit (an interdisciplinary research group specialized in demographic and sociological analysis, as well as labor market and criminology studies). In 2009 he was nominated ICREA-Academia professor.

Prof. Esping-Andersen's scientific work centres on life course dynamics, social stratification and comparative social policy. Before coming to Pompeu Fabra, he taught at Harvard University, USA, the University of Trento, Italy, and the European University in Italy. His publications include The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism for which he was awarded the APSA's Aaron Wildavsky Enduring Contribution Award in 2005; The Social Foundations of Postindustrial Economies (translated into Italian and Japanese); The Incomplete Revolution(Polity Press 2009), and most recently Families in the 21st Century (Stockholm SNS, 2016).

Prof. Esping-Andersen is a member of the British Academy and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Doctor Honoris Causa at Roskilde and Copenhagen University. He is member of the scientific board of numerous scientific institutions including the Danish National Institute for Social Research, the CEACS of the Juan March Institute, IMDEA, and the Danish Strategic Research Council.

Prof. Esping-Andersen has been actively engaged in applied policy relevant work for international organizations, including the United Nations, the OECD, ISSA, and the European Union. He participated in the preparation for the EU's Lisbon Summit in 2000 and co-authored a report on welfare state reform for the Belgian presidency of the EU in 2002. He was also a member of EU President Baroso's social policy advisory group.

Prof. Esping-Andersen has directed a five-year ERC financed project on Family Polarization and Demographic Change.

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Marcus William Feldman
Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA, marc@charles.stanford.edu
Professor MARCUS WILLIAM FELDMAN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1997/1998. Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor of Biological Sciences, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, 1993 - present. Director, Morrison Institute for Population and Resource Studies, Stanford, 1986 - present. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1987 - present. Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1986 and Fellow, California Academy of Science. Honoary Professor, Beijing Normal University, 2002-2007. Paper of the year 2003 by The Lancet. (b. 1942)
Leopold Felsen
Polytechnic Institute of New York, USA
Professor LEOPOLD B. FELSEN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1984/1985. Institute Professor Polytechnic University in Brooklyn, New York and Boston University, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, USA. Recipient of First Citation for Distinguished Research by Polytechnic Chapter of Society of Sigma XI 1973; awarded Balthasar van der Pol Gold Medal, International Board of Officers of URSI 1975; Doctor Tecnices, Honoris Causa, Tech. University of Denmark 1979; Humboldt Foundation Senior Scientist Award 1980. A Life Fellow of the IEEE and Fellow of the Optical Society of America and the Acoustical Society of America. (1924 - 2005)
Michael Fisher
Dept. of Chemistry, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, USA
Professor MICHAEL FISHER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1981/1982. Horace White Professor, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. Recipient of Wolf Prize 1980, Boltzmann Medal 1983 and Royal Medal 2005. Member of National Academy of Science, 1983. Since 1987, Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. (b. 1931)
Jacob Frenkel
International Econ., Univ of Chicago/ Gov. of Bank of Israel, Merryll Lynch, USA
Professor JACOB A. FRENKEL, Sackler Scholar 1983/1984. David Rockefeller Professor of International Economics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Director of Research, International Monetary Fund, 1987-91; Governor, Bank of Israel, 1990-2000. Recipient of Israel Prize, 2002. Presently Vice-Chairman, American International Group (insurance corporation); Chairman, Group of Thirty (economic organization) and member of the Advisory Board, BrainStorm Cell Theraputic, Inc., Israel based biotech firm. (b. 1943)
Prof. Awi Federgruen
Professor of Management, Graduate School of Business, Columbia University af7@columbia.edu
Professor AWI FEDERGRUEN, Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Charles E. Exley Professor of Managemant, Graduate School of Business, Columbia University, New York, New York. Chairman Division, Risk and Operations Division since July 2004 and Member of the Executive Committee since 1989. He was Senior Vice Dean, responsible for all faculty and curricular affairs from 1997-2002 and Acting Dean, 2000-01. He was in Israel in 1988 as the Lady Davis Foundation Visiting Professor at Graduate School of Business, Hebrew University, Jerusalem and Visiting Professor, Department of Statistics, Tel Aviv University. Since 1979 Assistant Professor in Operations Management and Operations Research at the Graduate School of Management, University of Rochester. Recipient of the 2004 Distinguished Fellowship for Outstanding Research and Scholarship in Operations Management by the Manufacturing Service and Operations Management Society. Editorial activities: Senior Editor for MSOM journal Manufacturing and Service Operations Management from its inception, Associate Editor of Naval Research Quarterly, Associate Editor for Operations Research and former Departmental Editor for Management Science Manufacturing, Distributions Service Operations. (b. 1950)
Shoshana Felman
Dept. of French & Comp. Literature, Yale Univ., New Haven, USA, mailto:shoshana.felman@yale.edu
Professor SHOSHANA FELMAN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1992/1993. Robert Woodruff Professor of Comparative Literature and French, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia since 2004. Previously the Thomas E. Donnelley Professor of French and Comparative Literature, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. Recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship (for research in France) 1973-74; American Council of Learned Societies grant in aid for research in France 1978. Honoray title granted by the French Government: named Chevaller des palmes academiques 1982. Fellow of the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale University 1985-1988. Elected Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2010. (b. 1941)
Julio M. Fernéndez
Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York
Professor JULIO M. FERNÉNDEZ, Ph., Sackler Scholar 2008/2009. Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY. since 2002.Previous positions: Chairman, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, 1997-2000; Chairman, NIH BBCB/MSFC Study Section, 2003-2006; Member of the Technical Advisory Board at VEECO Digital Instruments Corporation, 2002-2004; and Co-Organizer, German-American Frontier of Sciences meeting. 2002. Recipient of Honors: Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, 1983-1985; Max-Planck Fellowship, 1985-1986; Established Investigator of the American Heart Association, 1989-1994; Alexander von Humboldt Senior US Scientist Award, 1996; Fellow of the American Heart Association, 2001; Council Member of the Biophysical Society, 2002-2005; and Woodward Lecture, Harvard-MIT Physical Chemistry 2005. Prof. Fern?ndez has written over 120 scientific articles in international journals, with many of those covering his pioneering work in developing force spectroscopy of single proteins. (b. 1954)
Gerald Fink
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, gfink@wi.mit.edu
Professor GERALD R. FINK, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1984/1985. Professor of Genetics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is a founding member of the Whitehead Institute and the American Cancer Society. He is currently a Senior Scholar in Infectious Disease of the Ellison Foundation. Dr. Finks was the Director of the Whitehead Institute from 1990 to 2001. He received his B.A from Amherst College in 1962 and his Ph.D. from Yale in 1965. In addition, he has received honorary doctorates from Amherst College and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Dr. Fink's research focuses on the molecular biology of fungal infectious disease. He served as president of the Genetics Society of America. Among his many awards are the National Academy of Sciences Award in Molecular Biology 1981, the Medal of the Genetics Society of America 1982, Emil Christian Hansen Award (Denmark), the Yale Science and Engineering Award, and the 2001 George Beadle Award. He has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine and the American Philosophical Society.
Steven D. Fraade
Department of Religious Studies Yale University P.O.Box 208287 New Haven, CT 06520-8287 USA, steven.fraade@yale.edu
Prof STEVEN D FRAADE, Sackler Scholar 2014/2015 is the Mark Taper Professor of the History of Judaism at Yale University, in the Department of Religious Studies and the Program in Judaic Studies. Professor Fraade graduated from Brown University in 1970 with an B.A. in Religious Studies, and received the degree of Ph.D. in 1980 from the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Oriental Studies, in ''post-biblical studies''. He joined the faculty of Yale in 1979 and became full professor in 1989. He has served as Chair of the Department of Religious Studies and of the Program in Judaic Studies and as the Director of Graduate Studies and Director of Undergraduate Studies of both. He currently chairs Yale's Program in Judaic Studies and until recently chaired its Language Study Committee. Among his fellowships and awards are a Morse Fellowship from Yale University, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, two Fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, as well as research grants from the American Philosophical Society, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture. In 1992 he won the National Jewish Book Award for Scholarship for his book From Tradition to Commentary. In 2011 he was elected as a Fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research, and in 2012 as an Honorary Member of the Academy of the Hebrew Language in Jerusalem. Professor Fraade serves on the Publications Committee of the Yale Judaica Series, Yale University Press, and is currently on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Biblical Literature, the Early Judaism and its Literature Series of the Society of Biblical Literature, and the Journal of Ancient Judaism Supplements. He serves on the Steering Committees of the Qumran and History and Literature of Early Rabbinic Judaism Sections of the Society of Biblical Literature. He is an Affiliated Scholar of the Center for Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization, Cardozo Law School. Professor Fraade has published widely in the history of ancient Judaism, rabbinic literature, multilingualism in antiquity, scriptural translation and interpretation, ancient Jewish legal rhetoric, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. He is the author of three books: Enosh and His Generation: Pre-Israelite Hero and History in Post-Biblical Interpretation (Scholars Press, 1984), From Tradition to Commentary: Torah and its Interpretation in the Midrash Sifre to Deuteronomy (State University of New York Press, 1991). Legal Fictions: Studies of Law and Narrative in the Discursive Worlds of Ancient Jewish Sectarians and Sages (Leiden: Brill, 2011). He is the co-editor of Rabbinic Perspectives: Rabbinic Literature and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Leiden: Brill, 2006), and Studies in the History and Culture of North American Jewry: Proceedings of the Symposium at Yale University, April 25, 2010, 2 vols. (English and Hebrew) (Jerusalem: The Center for Jewish Languages and Literatures, Hebrew University. The Program in Judaic Studies, Yale University, 2011). He is currently working on a book on scriptural translation and multilingualism in antiquity. Professor Fraade is married to Ellen D. Cohen, with whom he has three children. He is active in Jewish communal life of greater New Haven. He is a former vice-president of Congregation Beth El-Keser Israel, of which he is currently the chair of the Ritual Committee, chairs the Education Committee of Ezra Academy, and has served on the Community Relations Committee and Board of Trustees of the New Haven Jewish Federation, and is currently Vice President of the newly formed Jewish High School of Connecticut. (b. 1949)
Scott L. Friedman, M.D.
Director, Division of Liver Diseases Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA, Scott.Friedman@mssm.edu
Professor SCOTT L. FRIEDMAN, M.D., Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Fishberg Professor and Chief, Division of Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York since 2001. He has performed pioneering research into the underlying causes of scarring, or fibrosis associated with chronic liver disease, and was the first to isolate and characterize the hepatic stellate cell, which is the key cell type responsible for scar production in liver. Recipient of the Hans Popper International Liver Research Prize, Falk Foundation in Freiburg, Germany 2003, recognizing his pioneering work into mechanisms and treatments of hepatic fibrosis. Current editorial positions: Senior Editor, Current Diagnosis and Treatment in Gastroenterology. Memberships and numerous committees include: Scientific Advisory Board, US-Israel Binational Science Foundation; American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Governing Board (to be AASLD President in 2009), Association of American Physicians and Fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association.
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Roy Glauber
Dept. of Physics, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, USA, glauber@physics.harvard.edu
Professor ROY J. GLAUBER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1987/1988. Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts and Adjunct Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, USA. Recipient: A. Michelson Medal, Franklin Institute, Philadelphia 1985; the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics, American Physical Society, 1996; and the Nobel Prize in Physics 2005; and the 'Medalla de Oro del Spanish National Research Council' ('CSIC's Gold Medal') 2008. (b. 1925)
Victor L. Granatstein
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland vlg@umd.edu
Morteza Gharib
Aeronautics and Fluid Mechanics, California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, USA, MoryG@ghost.galcit.caltech.edu
Professor MORTEZA GAHARIB, Sackler Scholar 2001/2002. Hans W. Liepmann Professor of Aeronautics and Professor of Bio-Inspired Engineering, Director of Center for Quantitative Visualization, Graduate Aeronautical Labs, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, 1993 - present. Fellow, American Society of Mechanical Engineering. Editor, Experiments of Fluids. Member, American Physical Society. Recipient, Award for Excellence, Visualized Image, 1995, Visualization Society of Japan; Flow Visualization Award, American Physical Society, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1993, 1994; R&D Magazine's R&D 100 Award, 2008. (b. 1955)
Solomon Golomb
Electrical Engineering and Mathematics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA, milly@usc.edu
Professor SOLOMON W. GOLOMB, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1989/1990. Viterbi Professor of Communications and University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Mathematics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. Member of United States National Academy of Sciences, and United States National Academy of Engineering. Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institution of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Winner of the Shannon Award, 1985 (highest award of the Information Theory Society of the IEEE) and the Hamming Gold Medal, 2000 of the IEEE. Honorary doctorate degrees from Dubna International University, Russia and the Hebrew Union College, USA. Distinguished Alumnus Award of the Johns Hopkins University, 2002. Member of the Academic Advisory Committee and the International Board of Governors, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, 2003-present. (b. 1932)
David Gross
Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, California, USA
Professor DAVID GROSS, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Frederick W. Gluck Professor of Theoretical Physics and Director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. in 1966 at UC Berkeley. He was previously Thomas Jones Professor of Mathematical Physics at Princeton University. He has been a central figure in particle physics and string theory including the discovery of asymptotic freedom and the consequent development of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of the strong nuclear force. This completed the Standard Model, which details how the three basic forces of particle physics--the electromagnetic force, the weak force, and the strong force--interact. He has also made seminal contributions to the theory of Superstrings, a burgeoning enterprise that brings gravity into the quantum framework, especially the discovery and development of heterotic string theory. His awards include the J. J. Sakurai Prize of the American Physical Society, 1986 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship Prize, 1987 Dirac Medal, 1988 Oscar Klein Medal, Stockholm University, 2000Harvey Prize, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, 2000 the European Physical Society Prize in Elementary Particle Physics, 2003 the Grande Medaille d?Or, Academie des Sciences, France, 2004 and the Nobel Prize in Physics, 2004. He holds honorary degrees from the United States, Britain, France, Israel and Brazil. His membership includes the National Academy of Science, elected 1986 the American Academy of Arts and Science, elected 1985 the American Physical Society, elected 1974 and the Indian Academy of Science, elected 2007. (b. 1941)
David Grusky
Department of Sociology, Stanford University, USA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA,
Professor DAVID B. GRUSKY, Sackler Lecturer, 2007/2008. Director, Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality, Stanford University, Stanford, California since 2005. Also on the Advisory Board, Institute for Research in the Social Sciences; Advisory Council, American Sociological Association Methodology Section, 2006-2008. Memberships include: Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science since 2003; Society for the Study of Social Problems since 2004; American Sociological Association since 1984; American Statistical Association since 1994; American Association for the Advancement of Science since 1985. Recipient of the Max Weber Prize, 2005 American Sociological Association, Occupational Ghettos: The Worldwide Segregation of Women and Men, M. Charles and D. B. Grusky, 2004. Editorial responsibilities include: Co-Editor (with M. Tienda and P. England), Studies in Social Inequality and Controversies in Inequality , Stanford University Press Series Editor since 1997; Editorial Boards, Contexts since 2004 and Worldwide Attitudes since 1998. His recent books are: The Inequality Reader: Contemporary and Foundational Readings in Race, Class, and Gender (ed., D. B. Grusky and S. Szelény, 2007); The Declining Significance of Gender? (ed., F. D. Blau, M. C. Brinton, and D. B. Grusky, 2006); Mobility and Inequality: Frontiers of Research from Sociology and Economics (ed. S. Morgan, G. Fields, and D. B. Grusky, 2006); Poverty and Inequality (ed. D. B. Grusky and R. Kanbur, 2006).(b. 1958)
Erich Gruen
Department of History and Classics, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, gruene@berkeley.edu
Professor ERICH GRUEN, Sackler Scholar 2009/2010. Gladys Rehard Wood Professor of History and Classics, University of California, Berkeley since 1986. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1986 Winston Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1996 Austrian Cross of Honor for Arts and Letters, awarded 1999 American Philosophical Society, 2000 Honorary Member of the Roman Society, London, 2006 The Berkeley Citation for distinguished achievement and for notable service to the University, awarded 2007 and Villa Professor, the Getty Villa, 2007-08. Prof. Gruen has written about 10 books, 200 scholarly articles and reviews. He taught lecture courses on the historical background to major texts from antiquity (e.g. Exodus, later books of the Bible, Homer, Aeschylus, Herodotus, Thucydides, Vergil, Ovid, Tacitus), the Hellenistic period (from Alexander the Great to Cleopatra), the Roman Republic (from origins to the death of Caesar), and the Roman Empire (from Augustus to Constantine). (b. 1935)
Max Gassmann

Director of the Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich, Switzerland, maxg@access.uzh.ch


Prof. Max Gassmann, Sackler Lecturer 2016/17, is a trained Swiss veterinarian with Peruvian roots. He is full professor of Veterinary Physiology and head of the corresponding institute, as well as Director of the Zurich Center of Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), both institutions located at the University of Zurich. He graduated in Zurich before moving as a postdoctoral fellow to Stanford University Medical School were he joint the team of Prof. Paul Berg (Nobel Prize Laureate) for three years. Back in Zurich he first was lecturer at the Institute of Human Physiology before heading the one in the Veterinary Faculty.

 

Prof. Gassmann works on erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR) since 1992. Among other achievements he established an Epo-overexpressing mouse line that shows a constitutive hematocrit of 80%. That animal model became very well known in the community as several observations were unexpected, for example the fact that expression of Epo in the eye protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. Up to now, over 25 manuscripts dealing with that mouse model were published. Based on his research he won several awards and was offered simultaneously three full professorships in Physiology, namely at the University of Heidelberg, Erlangen and Zurich. He is member of the Faculty of 1000 (F1000), Founding Member and Member of the Editorial Board of the newly established Journal “HYPOXIA” and has a standing visiting professorship at the Medical Faculty of the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia (UPCH) in Lima, Peru. Apart form generating the above-mentioned Epo-overexpressing transgenic mouse line, he provided the community with the first working anti-HIF-1 antibody harvest from chicken eggs, demonstrated that Epo and EpoR are both expressed in the human and mouse brain and showed that Epo has a variety of non-erythropoietic functions such as protection against stroke and retinal degeneration, Epo-induced regulation of the hypoxic ventilatory response and Epo’s impact on cognition and motivation. At present, his H-index is 56 and he has published about 250 original articles and reviews.

Shiv Grewal

NIH Distinguished Investigator; Chief, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology;Head, Chromosome Biology Section of the Center for Cancer Research; National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Maryland, USA. shiv.grewal@nih.gov


Dr. Shiv Grewal, Sackler Lecturer 2018/2019, is an NIH Distinguished Investigator and is currently serving as the Chief of the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Head of the Chromosome Biology Section of the Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. He began his scientific career at the University of Cambridge, UK, where he held the prestigious Cambridge-Nehru scholarship. In 1993, he joined the National Cancer Institute as a postdoctoral fellow to pursue his interests in the epigenetic control of gene expression.

Apart from his pioneering work on the role of centromeric repeats in heterochromatin assembly, Prof. Grewal showed that epigenetic imprints can be stably propagated through meiosis and in some instances inherited in cis. He also identified factors involved in the modifications of histones as key components of epigenetic marking process. Prof. Grewal joined Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory as an Assistant Professor in 1998 and was promoted to Associate Professor position. In 2003, he joined National Cancer Institute, Bethesda as a Senior Investigator.

Dr. Grewal and colleagues discovered a highly conserved connection between RNAi and heterochromatin assembly that has revolutionized the current thinking on how complex genomes are assembled into higher-order chromatin structures. This important contribution was selected as a Breakthrough of the Year 2002 by Science magazine. Three papers from Prof. Grewal’s laboratory are cited for historic discoveries over the past 50 years by Nature. Prof. Grewal is the recipient of the prestigious Newcomb-Cleveland Prize, NIH Merit Award, and the NIH Directors’ award. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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David Weiss Halivni
Classical Jewish Civilization, Columbia University, New York, USA, dw13@columbia.edu
Professor DAVID WEISS HALIVNI, Recipient: Israel Prize 2009, Talmud Research; Sackler Scholar 1998/1999. Lucius N. Littauer Professor of Classical Jewish Civilization, Columbia University, New York, New York., 1985 - present. Recipient of Bialik Prize, City of Tel Aviv ,1985; Guggenheim and Louis Ginzberg Fellowships; Former President, American Academy for Jewish Research; Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Science; Honorary Doctorate, Tel Aviv University, 1998 and Award of Distinction, Bar Ilan University, 2003. He emigrated to Israel in July 2005 and teaches at Hebrew University and Bar Ilan University. (b. 1928)
Ulf Hannerz
Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden, ulf.hannerz@socant.su.se
Professor ULF HANNERZ, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. Professor of Social Anthropology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. Member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences since 1987; Honorary Foreign Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1994; Chair, European Association of Social Anthropologists, 1995-96; Recipient of the Rettig Prize, Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities 1996. and Honoray Doctorate, Oslo University, Faculty of Social Sciences 2005. Section Editor (Anthropology), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences (2001). (b. 1942)
David Harbater
Department of Mathematics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, harbater@math.upenn.edu
Professor DAVID HARBATER, Sackler Lecturer 2006/2007. Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor in the School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Mathematics, University of Pennsylvania. Recipient: Frank Nelson Cole Prize in Algebra, 1995 and the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1995. General interests: Galois theory with connections to arithmetic algebraic geometry. (b. 1952)
Robert Haselkorn
Dept. of Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology, Univ. of Chicago, USA, rh01@midway.uchicago.edu
Professor ROBERT HASELKORN, Sackler Scholar 1986/1987. F. L. Pritzker Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Illinois. Recipient of the Interstate Post-graduate Medical Association Award 1967; Darbaker Prize of the Botanical Society of America 1982; Gregor Mendel Medal in Biological Science, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 1996. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Vice-President and Chair of the Midwest Center since 1993. Member, National Academy of Sciences. (b. 1934)
Morton Horwitz
History of American Law Harvard Law School, USA, horwitz@law.harvard.edu
Professor MORTON J. HORWITZ, Sackler Scholar 1989/1990. Charles Warren Professor American Legal History, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts since 1981. Editor of Harvard Law Review. Recipient of the Thomas Wilson Prize from Harvard University Press 1978; Bancroft Prize in American History for The Transformation of American Law, 1780-1860 (1977), 1978. Fields of Interest: Cancer (tobacco/ cigarette industry), Host Liability in Drunk Driving Cases, Legal History and Torts and Products Liability. (b. 1938)
Jörg Hacker
Board of "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"; and Vice President of "Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
Professor Jörg Hacker, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Chair for "Molekulare Infektionsbiologie", ZINF, University of Wörzburg, Germany since 2000. Honors and Grateful Memberships: Member of the "Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina", 1998; Carus-Medal of the Leopoldina & Carus-Award, City of Schweinfurt, 2001; Honorary Doctor (Dr. med. h.c.), University of Umea/Sweden; "Academy of Sciences" Gottingen, 2003; Honorary Doctor, Tel Aviv University 2012; Member of the "Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften", 2006. Member in Editorial Boards: Infection and Immunity, 1995 - ; International Journal of Medical Microbiology (Editor in Chief), 2000 - present; Current Opinion in Microbiology, 2002 - present. Membership in Scientific Societies: Board of the "Robert Koch Foundation", 1999 - present; Institute "Technik-Theologie-Naturwissenschaften", (TTN), University of Munich, 2001 - present; Speaker, Forschungsverbund FORIMMUN of the Bavarian Research Society, 2003 - present; Board of "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Äuml;rzte"; and Vice President of "Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), 2003 - present. Marc Rich Academic Workshops 2007, Tel Aviv University, "Molecular Processes in Health and Diseases, Microbiology and microbial Bioinformatics", Organization committee. (b. 1952)
Joseph Halpern
Computer Science Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA
Professor JOSEPH HALPERN, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Computer Science Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York since 1996. He received a B.Sc. in Mathematics from the University of Toronto in 1975 and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Harvard University in 1981. In between, he spent two years as the Head of the Mathematics Department at Bawku Secondary School, in Ghana. After a year as a visiting scientist at MIT, he joined the IBM Almaden Research Center in 1982, where he remained until 1996, also serving as a Consulting Professor at Stanford University. Prof. Halpern's major research interests are in reasoning about knowledge and uncertainty, security, distributed computation, decision theory, and game theory. Together with his former student, Yoram Moses, he pioneered the approach of applying reasoning about knowledge to analyzing distributed protocols and multi-agent systems. He has coauthored 5 patents, two books (Reasoning About Knowledge and Reasoning about Uncertainty), and over 200 technical publications.   Prof. Halpern is a Fellow of the AAAI, the ACM, and the AAAS. Among other awards, he received the ACM/AAAI Newell Award in 2009, the Godel Prize in 1997, and was a Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow in 2001-02. Two of his papers have won best-paper prizes at IJCAI (1985 and 1991), and another won one at the Knowledge Representation and Reasoning Conference (2006). He was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the ACM (1997-2003) and has been program chair of a number of conferences, including the Symposium on Theory in Computing (STOC), Logic in Computer Science (LICS), Uncertainty in AI (UAI), Principles of Distributed Computing (PODC), and Theoretical Aspects of Rationality and Knowledge (TARK).
Serge Haroche
Professor at Collége de France (in the chair of quantum physics), haroche@lkb.ens.fr
Prof. SERGE HAROCHE, Sackler Lecturer 2011, Sackler Lecturer 2010/2011 is Professor at Collége de France (in the chair of quantum physics) since 2001 and was Chairman, l'Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) Department of Physics, Paris, France (1994-2000). He graduated from Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), receiving his doctorate from Paris VI University in 1971 (thesis advisor: Claude Cohen-Tannoudji). After a post-doctoral visit to Stanford University in the laboratory of Arthur Schawlow (1972-73), he became full professor at Paris VI University in 1975, a position he held until 2001, when he was appointed Professor at Collége de France (in the chair of Quantum Physics). He has been also Maitre de Conférences at Ecole Polytechnique (1974-1984), visiting professor at Harvard (1981), part time professor at Yale University (1984-1993), member of Institut Universitaire de France (1991-2001). His research work has mostly taken place in laboratoire Kastler Brossel at ENS, where he now works with a team of senior coworkers, postdocs and graduate students. Serge Haroche's main research areas are in quantum optics and experimental quantum information science. He has made important contributions to Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics, a branch of quantum optics in which he has performed landmark experiments including the observation of single atom spontaneous emission enhancement in a cavity (1983), the direct observation of the decoherence of mesoscopic superpositions of states (so-called Schrédinger cat states) (1996), the quantum-non-demolition measurement of a single photon (1999) and the repetitive non destructive detection of photons, revealing the quantum jumps of light (2007). In several experiments manipulating single atoms and photons in high-Q cavities, Serge Haroche and his team have demonstrated basic quantum information procedures, such as the generation of atom-atom and atom-photon entanglement, the realization of photonic memories and the operation of quantum logic gates involving photons and atoms as quantum bits. These experiments illustrate fundamental aspects of quantum physics, explore the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds, and open perspectives for the processing of quantum information. Recipient of many prizes and awards, including: Grand Prix Jean Ricard, French Physical Society, 1983; Einstein Prize for Laser Science, 1988; Humbold Award, Germany, 1992; Michelson Medal, Franklin Institute, 1993; Tomassoni Award, La Sapienza University, Rome, 2001; Quantum Electronics Prize, European Physical Society, 2002; Quantum Communication Award, International Organization for Quantum Communication, Measurement and Computing, 2002; Townes Award, Optical Society of America, the CNRS Gold Medal, 2009; and the Nobel Prize in Physics, 2012. Fellow, American Physical Society, 1990. Member: French Academy of Sciences, 1993, Foreign Member: Brazilian Academy of Sciences, 2009 and National Academy of Sciences, USA, 2010. (born in Casablanca, 1944)
Geoffrey Hartman
Department of Comparative Literature, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, Geoffrey.Hartman@yale.edu
Professor GEOFFREY HARTMAN, Sackler Scholar 1996/1997. Sterling Professor Emeritus and Senior Research Scholar of English and, Comparative Literature, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. Project Director, Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, University Library. Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Corresponding Fellow, Brtitish Academy. Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies, Hebrew University 1985-86 and 1988-89; Fulbright Lecturer 1985, 87, and 89; Montgomery Fellow, Dartmouth College 1994; "The Life of Learning," annual Haskins Lecture, American Council of Learned Societies and Corresponding Fellow, The British Academy, 2000. ?Kulturwissenschaft Award,? Pro-Europa, 2005; Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism (The Geoffrey Hartman Reader), 2006. (b. 1929)
Stevan E. Hobfoll
The Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois Steven_Hobfoll@rush.edu
Professor STEVAN HOBFOLL, Sackler Lecturer 2010-2011. The Judd and Marjorie Weinberg Presidential Professor and Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Center for National Security Studies at the University of Haifa, Israel. Formerly at Tel Aviv and Ben Gurion Universities, and an officer in the Israeli Defense Forces, he remains involved with the problem of stress in Israel. He has authored and edited 11 books, including TRAUMATIC STRESS, THE ECOLOGY OF STRESS, and STRESS CULTURE AND COMMUNITY. In addition, he has authored over 200 journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports, and has been a frequent workshop leader on stress, war, and terrorism. He has received over $12 million in research grants on stress. Dr. Hobfoll was cited by the Encyclopédia Britannicafor his contribution to knowledge and understanding for his Ecology of Stress volume and received lifetime achievement awards for his work on stress and trauma from several scientific societies. He was co-chair of the American Psychological Association Commission on Stress and War during Operation Desert Storm, helping plan for the prevention of prolonged distress among military personnel and their families, member of the Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Biodefense Science Board (NBSB), and a member of APA?s Task Force on Resilience in Response to Terrorism. (b. 1951)
Benjamin HarshavProfessor BENJAMIN
Professor of Comparative Literature, Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature, and Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Yale University, USA, benjamin.harshav@yale.edu
Professor BENJAMIN HARSHAV , (formerly: Hrushovski), Sackler Scholar 2007/2008. Professor of Comparative Literature, J.& H. Blaustein Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature; and Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Yale University. L.&S. Porter Professor Emeritus of Poetics and Literary Theory, Tel Aviv University. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Benjamin Harshav was born in Vilna (Vilnius) in 1928, studied in the Soviet Union during World War II; fought in the Israeli War of Independence. In 1947 he co-edited in Munich a Zionist youth journal for the D.P. camps. In 1951/53 he co-edited Likrat, a journal that launched modern Israeli poetry. He studied Hebrew literature and Jewish History at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and Comparative Literature at Yale. Between 1953-1966, he taught Hebrew and Comparative Literature at Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Since 1966 he built a dept. for Poetics and Comparative Literature at Tel-Aviv University, launched the ?Tel-Aviv School of Poetics? and established the Porter Institute for Poetics and Semiotics: For the Study of Literature and Culture. At Tel Aviv University, he founded and edited several academic journals: in Hebrew: HaSifrut / Literature and the series of books Literature Meaning Culture; and in English: the international journals PTL (Poetics and Theory of Literature) and Poetics Today. He served as Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and at several other universities. He was a Fellow of the National Humanities Center in North Carolina; the Institute for Advanced Studies in Berlin; and the Oxford Center for Postgraduate Hebrew Studies. Harshav published widely (mainly in Hebrew and English) on literary theory, Semiotics of culture, Comparative and Hebrew literature, and modern art. His works were translated and published in twelve languages. His books in English include: Explorations in Poetics (Stanford UP), Marc Chagall and the Lost Jewish World: The Nature of his Art and Iconography (Rizzoli), American Yiddish Poetry, Language in Time of Revolution , The Meaning of Yiddish (University of California Press), The Last Days of the Jerusalem of Lithuania: Chronicles from Vilna Ghetto and the Camps 1939-1944 (Yale UP), Marc Chagall and his Times: A Documentary Narrative (1,026 pages), which was awarded the Koret Prize for best Jewish book in 2004, Marc Chagall on Art and Culture (Stanford UP), The Rift in Time: Time in the Art of Space (on the Israeli abstract painter Moshe Kupferman), The Moscow Yiddish Theater: Art on the Stage in Time of Revolution (Yale UP) His books in Hebrew include a two-volume historical and critical anthology Hebrew Renaissance Poetry, and the first six volumes of Harshav?s collected studies. He translated poetry from several languages into Hebrew (notably the anthology Modern Poetry) and (with Barbara Harshav) into English, notably: A Life of Poetry: 1948-1994 by Yehuda Amichai (Harper-Collins), Sing Stranger:A Historical Anthology of American Yiddish Poetry (Stanford UP). Harshav was awarded the highest Israeli prize: the EMET Prize (= Art, Science, Culture) for 2005. He is the recipient of the Uri-Zvi Grinberg Prize for Poetry and the Study of Poetry of the City of Jerusalem for the year 2000. Two volumes of Aderet le-Binyamin, a Festschrift for B.Harshav on his Seventieth Birthday appeared in Hebrew at Tel-Aviv University and three parts of a Harshav Festschrift were published in English by Poetics Today. Recipient, EMET Prize 2005 [the highest Israeli prize for lifetime achievements in Art, Science, Culture] He also wrote a history of Hebrew versification from Bible to the present. At present, Harshav?s main theoretical interest lies in the elaboration of a systematic ?Constructive Poetics,? explored in a series of papers and two volumes in Hebrew: Frames and Fields and The Art of Poetry, and in English: Explorations in Poetics. (b. 1928)
Arne Holmgren
Department of Medical Biochemistry & Biophysics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, arne.holmgren@mbb.ki.se
Professor ARNE HOLMGREN, Sackler Scholar 1996/1997. Director, Medical Nobel Institute for Biochemistry, Department of Medical Biochemistry & Biophysics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Member, Nobel Committee for Medicine, Karolinska Institute 1991-93; EMBO 1992, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 1991. Recipient, Erik K. Fernstroms Prize, Outstanding Young Investigator (under 45), Karolinska Institute (for discovery of glutaredoxin), 1980. Recipient of Eric K. Fernstrom Large Nordic Prize in Medical Research, Lund University for "his pioneering studies of redoxins-enzymes of central importance for cellular functions" 1997. (b. 1940)
Barry Honig
Director, Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Columbia University / HHMI, New York City bh6@columbia@edu
Professor BARRY HONIG, Ph.D., Sackler Lecturer 2010-2011. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Medical Center; Director, Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Columbia University; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Barry Honig's research involves the use of computational approaches, based on both biophysics and bioinformatics, to study the structure and function of biological macromolecules. His current interests include the molecular basis of cell-cell adhesion, the principles of protein-DNA recognition and the general exploration of protein sequence/structure/function relationships. Professor Honig received his B.Sc. from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in 1963 and the Ph.D. from the Weizmann Institute and Tel-Aviv University in 1968 under the direction of Joshua Jortner. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Martin Karplus in the Chemistry Department of Harvard and then with Cyrus Levinthal in the Biology Department of Columbia. He has been a Senior Lecturer in the Hebrew University and an Associate Professor at the University of Illinois. Since 1981, Dr. Honig has been a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University and is currently the Director of Columbia?s Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. He is an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been President of the Biophysical Society, received an NIH Merit Award, is recipient of the Founders Award of the Biophysical Society, the Alexander Hollaender Award in Biophysics from National Academy of Sciences and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society. He is the author of over 250 publications.
David Hopwood
Department of Molecular Microbiology, John Innes Centre, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom, website: david.hopwood@bbsrc.ac.uk
Professor Sir DAVID HOPWOOD, Sackler Scholar 1996/1997. John Innes Professor of Genetics, Department of Molecular Microbiology, John Innes Centre, and Emeritus Professor, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom. Member, Genetical Society of Great Britain 1957 - date (President 1984-87); Society for General Microbiology 1955 - date; American Society for Microbiology 1967 - date; European Molecular Biology Organization 1984 - date. Fellow, Institute of Biology, London 1967 - date; Royal Society of London 1979 - date. Recipient, Hoechst-Roussel Award for Research in Anitmicrobial Chemotherapy, 1988 and Chiron Biotechnology Award, 1992 - American Society for Microbiology. (b. 1933)
John Hyman

Faculty of Philosophy, The Queen's College, University of Oxford, England, john.hyman@queens.ox.ac.uk


Prof. John Hyman, Sackler Scholar 2017/2018, is a Fellow of The Queen's College, Oxford, Professor of Aesthetics in the University of Oxford, and Editor of the British Journal of Aesthetics. He held a Getty Scholarship at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, in 2001-2002, a Fellowship at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin in 2002-2003, and a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship in 2010-2012. He was Visiting Professor at PKU, Beijing in 2012-2013, Professor Invité at the Université Paris-Sorbonne in 2014-2015, and Santander Cátedra de Excelencia at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid in 2016-17.

​Prof. Hyman's main research interests are in epistemology, philosophy of mind and action, philosophy of art, and the philosophy of Wittgenstein.  In his most recent book, Action, Knowledge and Will (OUP, 2015), he argues that human behaviour has four irreducibly different dimensions —physical, psychological, intellectual, and ethical — which were amalgamated or confused in the traditional idea of a ‘will’. His work in philosophy of art has focused mainly on the visual arts. His book The Objective Eye (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2006) is about the nature of colours and shapes, their representation in pictorial art, and the concept of realism in art theory.

Duncan Haldane

Nobel Prize Laurate in Physics,Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA.  haldane@princeton.edu


Prof. F. Duncan M. Haldane, Sackler Lecturer 2018/2019, who shared the 2016 Nobel Prize for Physics with David Thouless and Michael Kosterlitz, is the Sherman Fairchild University Professor of Physics at Princeton University.  He is also a foreign associate of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the Institute of Physics (UK).

 

Prof. Haldane received his Ph.D. in theoretical condensed matter physics from Cambridge University, under the direction and mentorship of Philip W. Anderson (Nobel Laureate in Physics 1977). Previously to his appointment at Princeton University he worked at research labs including the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France), the University of Southern California, the Bell Laboratories and the University of California, San Diego. 

 

Prof. Haldane was awarded, a share of the Nobel Prize for his theoretical work on “topological states of matter”, including the pioneering work on (unexpected and initially controversial) “topological quantum states” of one-dimensional systems of magnetic atoms and on his theoretical prediction from 1988 of (ferromagnetic) topological insulators exhibiting the “quantum anomalous Hall effect”. On his work on “topological quantum states” of one-dimensional systems of magnetic atoms, he had received the Oliver Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society in 1993, and on his theoretical prediction of (ferromagnetic) topological insulators exhibiting the “quantum anomalous Hall effect”, which was later observed experimentally in 2013, he had received the 2012 Dirac medal of the International Center for Theoretical Physics (Trieste) with Charles Kane and Shou-Cheng Zhang.

 

 Prof. Haldane’s work helped to open up new directions and ways of thinking about quantum effects in condensed matter. In recent years, “topological quantum matter” has grown into an active experimental field, who many believe may provide platforms for “quantum computing. Along with this, he had also initiated the field of “topological photonics”. He currently works on “quantum geometry” in the “fractional quantum Hall effect”.

 

Prof. Haldane was born in London in 1951, of mixed Scottish and Slovenian origins. Despite having three forenames, he is unrelated to the famous biologist J. B. S. Haldane.

 

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Jörg Imberger
Centre for Water Research at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia.
Professor JÖRG IMBERGER, Sackler Scholar 2003/2004. Vice-Chancellor's Distinguished Fellow; Chair, Centre for Water Research; and Group Leader, Environmental Fluid Dynamics at the University of Western Australia. Additional Current Professional Positions: Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, Institute of Engineers in Australia, the Australian Academy of Science; the US National Academy of Engineering and Foreign Associate Fellow, American Geophysical Union. Chair, Western Australian Estuarine Research Foundation; Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Earthwatch; Taskforce Member, Swan-Canning Cleanup Programme; UN Appointment, High Level Advisory Board on "Sustainable Development". Recipient of the Kernot Medal, 1997 for "recognition of distinguished engineering achievement". (b. 1942)
Neil Immerman

College of Information and Computer Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA, immerman@cs.umass.edu


Prof. Neil Immerman, Sackler Lecturer 2016/17, is Professor of Computer Science in the College of Computer and Information Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA. He earned a BS and MS in mathematics from Yale University in three years, after which he recovered by taking a year working for GTE Sylvania programming early computer controlled telephone switches. His program controlled 96 phone lines and ran on a PDP 8 using only 4K bytes of memory (which was all there was).

 

Prof. Immerman began his graduate career at Cornell University in Mathematical Logic and completed his Ph.D. in Theoretical Computer Science. His thesis developed the field of Descriptive Complexity, an area that has demonstrated that all important computational complexity classes have natural characterizations in logic.

 

Prof. Immerman’s research applies logic to several areas of computer science including computational complexity theory, database theory, model checking and static analysis. One of Prof. Immerman’s most famous results is the Immerman-Vardi Theorem, characterizing polynomial time as the set of properties expressible in first-order logic plus a least fixed-point operator, which formalizes the power of defining new relations by induction. Another is the Immerman-Szelepcsnyi Theorem which proved the — at the time — very surprising result that all nondeterministic space complexity classes are closed under complementation. 

 

Before his current position, he has taught at Tufts University and Yale University, and has had visiting appointments at MSRI in Berkeley, Cornell University, the University of Wisconsin and Stanford University. 

 

Prof. Immerman is the winner, jointly with Robert Szelepcsnyi, of the 1995 Goedel Prize in theoretical computer science. He is an editor of Logical Methods in Computer Science and of the Complexity Column of the SIGLOG newsletter. He is an ACM Fellow (elected in 2002) and a Guggenheim Fellow (2003-04). "Immerman Fest", a workshop in honor of Neil Immerman's 60th Birthday, was held during the Fifteenth International Workshop on Logic and Computational Complexity, July 2014 in Vienna, Austria.

 

Prof. Immerman is married to the computer scientist Susan Landau, who works on cybersecurity policy issues.  He has two children; his son Daniel has a PhD in philosophy, while his daughter Ellie is completing her masters in technology and policy.

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Jerry Jacobs
Department of Sociology; University of Pennsylvania, USA. jjacobs@sas.upenn.edu
Prof. JERRY A. JACOBS, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016, Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania.
Daniel Jackson
Professor of Computer Science and a MacVicar Teaching Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Cambridge, USA, dnj@mit.edu
Prof. DANIEL JACKSON, Sackler Lecturer 2013/2014. He led the development of the Alloy modeling language and its analysis tool, the Alloy Analyzer. Alloy was the first modeling language to support automatic analysis of models involving rich data structures, and the language and tool have been widely applied in many areas from web security to network protocols, and taught in courses throughout the world. He is the author of 'Software Abstractions: Logic, Language, and Analysis' (MIT Press, 2006), and was chair of a National Academies study entitled 'Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence?' (National Academies, May 2007). He has broad interests in many areas of software engineering, especially in dependability and critical systems, in software design and specification, and in formal methods.   Professor Jackson received his MA from Oxford University in Physics, and SM and PhD from MIT in Computer Science, and has been a software engineer for Logica UK and Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is also a photographer whose work was exhibited most recently in the MIT Museum. "
Dov Jaron
Department of biomedical engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA, dov.jaron@drexel.edu
Professor DOV JARON, Sackler Lecturer, 2006/2007. Calhoun Distinguished Professor of Engineering in Medicine, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University since 1998; Professor and Director, Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute, Drexel University from 1980 to 1996. Director, Biomedical Technology and Associate Director, National Center for Research Resources, NIH from 1996-1998; Director, Division of Biological and Critical Systems, National Science Foundation from 1991 to 1993. President, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society 1986-1987; President, International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2000-2003. Honors: Fellow - Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, American Association for the Advancement of Science, International Academy for Medical and Biological Engineering, Academy of Surgical Research. Awards - NIH Director's Award 1998; IEEE Third Millennium Medal 2000; Merit Award, International Union for Physical and Engineering Sciences in Medicine 2006. (b. 1939)
Paul Joyce

Samuel Davidson Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, Department of Theology & Religious Studies, King’s College London, England, paul.joyce@kcl.ac.uk


Prof. Paul M. Joyce, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is Samuel Davidson Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible at King’s College London. He studied Theology before completing doctoral studies in Old Testament at Oxford, where he was Kennicott Hebrew Fellow. His first post was as Lecturer and subsequently Director of Studies at Ripon College, Cuddesdon, a seminary of the Church of England. He then moved to the University of Birmingham as a Lecturer and subsequently to Oxford University, where he was University Lecturer in Old Testament and a Fellow of St Peter’s College. He was appointed as Samuel Davidson Professor of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible at King’s in 2012. He served as Chairman of the Oxford Theology Faculty Board 2008 - 2011 and as Head of Department at King’s 2013 - 2017. He was President of the Society for Old Testament Study for its centennial year of 2017.



Prof. Joyce's research interests include: The Exilic Age of Ancient Israel, especially the books of Ezekiel and Lamentations; the book of Amos; the History of the Reception of the Bible in Judaism and Christianity; and Psychological Interpretation of the Bible. Publications include Ezekiel: A Commentary Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies, 482 (New York and London: T&T Clark / Continuum, 2007; paperback, 2009);  co-authored with Diana Lipton, Lamentations through the Centuries Blackwell Bible Commentary (Oxford: Blackwell, 2013);  co-edited with Dalit Rom-Shiloni, The God Ezekiel Creates Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies, 607 (London and New York: T&T Clark / Bloomsbury, 2015);  and, co-edited with A. Mein, After Ezekiel: Essays on the Reception of a Difficult Prophet Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 535 (New York and London: T&T Clark / Continuum, 2011).

 

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Walter Kohn
Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, USA, kohn@physics.ucsb.edu
Professor WALTER KOHN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1988/1989. Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, USA. Recipient of the Oliver E. Buckley Award, 1961; Davisson Germer Prize, 1977; Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1998 and Honorary Doctor of Science, Harvard University 2012. (b. 1923)
Bertram Kostant
Dept. of Mathematics, MIT, Cambridge, USA, kostant@math.mit.edu
Professor BERTRAM KOSTANT, Past Sackler Institute Member, Academic Year 1982/83. Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Recipient Medal College de France, Steele Prize, 1990. (b. 1928)
David Kreps
Stanford University Graduate School of Business, Stanford, California, USA, kreps_david@gsb.stanford.edu
Professor DAVID M. KREPS, Sackler Scholar 1989/1990. Theodore J. Kreps Professor of Economics and Senior Associate Dean for Acaemic Affairs, Stanford University Graduate School of Business, Stanford, California, USA. Awarded the John Bates Clerk Medal, American Economics Association, 1989 and Honorary Doctorate, Université Paris-Dauphine, 2001. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Member, National Academy of Sciences. (b. 1950)
Anton Kaes
Chancellor Professor of German and Film Studies since 1996. Director, Film Studies Program, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.
Professor ANTON KAES, Sackler Scholar 2007/2008 and 2008/2009. Director of the Film Studies Program from 1991-98 and Chair of the German Department from 2001-2006. Co-Founder and Co-Director of the bi-annual German Film Institute since 1985 and co-editor of the book series "Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism" with the University of California since 1990. Recipient of an NEH Research Fellowship; UC President's Research Fellowship, 1995; and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize for 2005/06. Fellowships: Rockefeller Residential Research, Bellagio 1998 and Humanities Research Institute, University of California, Irvine 1996. Scholar in Residence: Getty Center for Art History and the Humanities in 1989/90, Rockefeller Center at Bellagio in 1998, Zentrum für Literaturwissenschaft in Berlin in 2000, and IFK (International Research Center for Cultural Studies) in Vienna in 2001. He is currently working on a book on the impact of World War I on the cinema of the Weimar Republic, entitled "Shell Shock Cinema: Weimar Culture and the Wounds of War" Princeton University Press, forthcoming in 2009. (b. 1945)
Valerian Kagan
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, kagan@pitt.edu
Prof. VALERIAN E. KAGAN, Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is Professor in many fields, University of Pittsburgh: School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology since 2005 Director, Free Radical and Antioxidant Health since 2004. Vice-Chairman, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, since 2000 School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology since 2007. Department of Chemistry since 2010. Also is Foreign Professor, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan, Russian State Medical University, Moscow and MV Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia since 2010. He is Fulbright Visiting Chair in Environmental Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada from 2013-2014. He received his B.S. 1967, M.S. 1968, and Ph.D. 1972 from the MV Lomonosov Moscow State University in Biochemistry, and his D.Sc. 1981 from the USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow in Biochemistry and Biophysics. Prof. Kagan is one of the world's recognized leaders and prominent authorities in the field of Free Radical Biology and Medicine. Internationally known for his interdisciplinary studies of oxidative stress, antioxidants, tissue and cell acute and chronic injury, he has founded a new field of research ''Oxidative Lipidomics'' and demonstrated its research power in investigations of cell death mechanisms. Free radicals, lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress have been long associated with tissue and cell damage through yet not well characterized specific mechanisms. The incompleteness of this knowledge is a stumbling block in discovery, development and effective implementation of antioxidant preventive and therapeutic strategies. His research is important as it uncovers specific pathways through which enzymes of oxidative metabolism participate in the production of specific oxygenated lipid molecules that act as signals triggering cell death program as well as mechanisms involved in clearance of damaged or dead cells.
Eli Kapon
Physics of Nanostructures Inst. of Micro & Optoelectronics Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. Lausanne, Switzerland, Eli.Kapon@imo.dp.epfl.ch
Professor ELI KAPON, Sackler Scholar 1999/2000. currently Director, Institute of Quantum Electronics and Photonics in the Faculty of Basic Sciences at EPFL. Professor of Physics of Nanostructures, Institute of Micro and Optoelectronics, Department of Physics, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland. Helped establishing the Tel Aviv University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and first Director, 2000-2002. Fellow, Optical Society of America, 1991; Senior Member IEEE, 1989 and the American Physical Society of America. Recipient, NASA Certificates of Recognition, 1985; Chaim Weizmann Postdoctoral Fellowship, 1982-1984; ; and the Humboldt Research Award, 2007. (b. 1953) 1953)
Dani Karavan
The Artist Studio Dani Karavan Israel, Tel Aviv, telaviv@danikaravan.com
The Artist, DANI KARAVAN, Sackler Scholar 2012/2013, was born in Tel Aviv and is the son of Avraham Karavan, the city's first landscape architect. He began studying painting when he was 14. He studied at the Bezalel School of Arts in Jerusalem from 1943-1949. He was amongst the founders of Kibkutz Harel in 1948 and was a kibbutz member until 1955. During this period he became a political artist and made political drawings and paintings. In 1956 he traveled to Florence to study Fresco painting. Back in Israel, he designed scenery for theatre, dance and opera and worked with Martha Graham and Gian Carlo Menotti etc. As early as 1963, Karavan created his first site specific environmental sculpture - the Negev Monument near Be'er Sheva, which became a landmark in site specific environmental art. In 1976 Karavan represented Israel in the Biennale of Venice. Since then, he has been commissioned to create environmental sculptures in Israel, Europe, United States, Korea and Japan. He has also exhibited in numerous museums around the world and is a recipient of prestigious international awards including the Israel Prize in 1977 for sculpture; Silver Medal of the French Academy of Architecture in 1992; Commander of the French ''Ordre des Arts et des Lettres'' - UNESCO's Picasso Medal in 1993; Goslar Kaiser Ring for Art, Germany - UNESCO's ''Artist for Peace'' in 1996; Member of the ''Orden pour le Merite'', Germany in 1998, and was one of the five recipients of the Japanese annual Praemium Imperiale Art in 1998, and visiting Professor in Tokyo; Goeth Medal, Germany in 1999; Member of the ''Academia del Disegno'' Florence, Italy in 2000; Piepenbrock Prize for sculpture, Berlin, Germany in 2004; Premio Michelangelo, Carrara, Italy in 2005; and the Commander's Cross of the Order of the Merit, Federal Republic of Germany (fourth level), awarded by the President of Germany in 2007. He is Doctor Honoris Causa, Doctor of Philosophy from Haifa University, 1997; Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1999; Weizmann Institute of Science, 2002; and Honorary Fellow, Shenkar College of Engineering and Design, 2003. Karavan's work often has high political and historical themes, while the forms stay abstract and universal. Typical examples are: ''The Way of Human Rights'' in Nurnberg, Germany; ''Passages - Homage to Walter Benjamin'' in Portbou, Spain; ''Murou Art Forest'' in Murou, Japan; ''Axe Majeur'' - a 3 KM urban environment in Cergy Pontoise near Paris on which he has been working since 1980. ''Dani Karavan - Retrospective'' one-man exhibitions include: Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, Tel-Aviv, Israel, November 2007 - February 2008; Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany, March - June 2008; Setagaya Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan, September - October 2008; and Nagasaki Prefectoral Art Museum, Nagasaki, Japan, December 2008 - February 2009. (b. 1930)
Michael Karin
Pharmacology and Pathology , Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego School of Medicine, USA
Professor MICHAEL KARIN, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology and Pathology, Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego School of Medicine since 2006. Frank and Else Schilling-American Cancer Society Research Professor since 1999; Honorary Member, Japanese Biochemical Society since 2000; Member, National Academy of Sciences since 2005; Honorary Member, the World Innovation Foundation since 2006; Foreign Associate, European Molecular Biology Organization since 2007. Additional honors: ranked 12th among the world's most cited scientists in Science Watch in 2003; UCSD Faculty Award for Excellence in Research and the Popper Lecture, American Association forStudy of Liver Disease in 2005; Peter Doherty Lecture, St. Jude Children?s Research Hospital in 2006; the Einstein Professorship, Chinese Academy of Science in 2009 and Honorary Doctoral Degree, Technical University Munich in 2010. Some of Prof. Karin's current research projects with the NIH include: Control of Prostate Cancer Metastasis. The major goal of this project is to focus on a signal transduction pathway that controls expression of the anti-metastatic gene maspin in prostate cancer and to provide new and information on the control of tumor metastasis. Stress Signaling Pathways in Toxicity and Disease. Major goals: To elucidate the role of stress activated protein kinases as mediators of mediators of disease that depend on interactions between environmental and genetic factors. Pulmonary Inflammation and Lung Cancer Development and Progression. To investigate the relationship between inflammation and metastatic progression in lung cancer.
Steven T. Katz
Director of the Elie Wiesel Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University, Boston, Ma.
Professor STEVEN T. KATZ, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Cantab), D.H.L. (honoris causa), B.D. (Cantab), Sackler Scholar 2008/2009, is Director of the Elie Wiesel Center for Judaic Studies at Boston University, Boston, Ma., and holds the Alvin J. and Shirley Slater Chair in Jewish and Holocaust Studies. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge [England] in 1972. Prior to coming to Boston he was Professor of Near Eastern Studies (Judaica) at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, where he was Chair of the Department of Near Eastern Studies from 1985-1988 and Director of the Jewish Studies Program 1985-1989. In addition to his regular teaching appointments at Dartmouth College (1972-1984) and Cornell University (1984 to1996) he has been a visiting professor at Yale, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and in 1989-90 was the Meyerhoff Professor at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a visiting University Professor at Yeshiva University (1995-6), and a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University from 1981-1984, again in 2002-2003 with the support of an NEH Fellowship, and from 2006-2008. He was Chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Museum for five years and still serves on that committee and is the Chair of the Holocaust Commission of the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture. He is one of the American representatives to the International Task Force on the Holocaust, established by the King of Sweden, now sponsored by the European Union. His many publications include: Jewish Philosophers (1975); Jewish Ideas and Concepts (1977); Post-Holocaust Dialogues, which won the National Jewish Book Award in 1984; Historicism, the Holocaust and Zionism (1992); and the multi-volume study entitled The Holocaust in Historical Context, vol. 1 which appeared in 1994, and was selected as ?the outstanding book in philosophy and theology? for that year by the American Association of University Publishers. Katz has also contributed to and edited four important books on mysticism printed by Oxford University Press: Mysticism and Philosophical Analysis (1978), Mysticism and Religious Traditions (1983), Mysticism and Language (1992), and Mysticism and Sacred Scripture (2000). He has also edited two volumes on the impact of the Holocaust on Jewish thought: The Impact of the Holocaust on Jewish Theology (2005) and Wrestling with God: Jewish Theological Responses During and After the Holocaust (2006). He is the editor of the prize-winning journal Modern Judaism, and has served on the editorial team of The Cambridge History of Judaism and The Cambridge History of Nineteenth Century Religious Thought. He has published over 100 articles in scholarly journals in the fields of Judaica, Holocaust studies, philosophy of religion, and comparative mysticism. He was awarded the University of T?bingen?s Lucas Prize for 1999. Past winners of this award include the Dalai Lama and Sir Karl Popper. He is a Fellow of both the American Academy of Jewish Research and the Academy of Jewish Philosophy. (b. 1944).
Prof. Lewis E. Kay
Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca
Prof. LEWIS E. KAY, Sackler Lecturer 2013/2014. Professor Kay received an undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from the University of Alberta (1983) and a doctorate degree in Biophysics at Yale (1988). He was a post-doctoral fellow in Chemical Physics at the NIH from June 1988-November 1991 and subsequently joined the faculty at the University of Toronto. He was Assistant Professor from 1992-94 and subsequently appointed Full Professor of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry. Prof. Kay has 350 publications 30,000 citations; 3 papers over 1000 citations 11 over 500, 38 over 200, h factor =93.   Prof. Kay is an honorary member and recipient of the following: Canada Society of Chemistry E.W.R. Steacie Award (2013). Appointed University Professor (2012). Royal Society of Chemistry Khorana Prize (2012). Election to the Royal Society of London, FRS (2010). Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Alberta (2009). Premier's Discovery Award, Province of Ontario (2008). Fellow International Society of Magnetic Resonance (2008). Dales Prize, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (2007). Election to the Royal Society of Canada (2006). Wilbur Cross Medal of the Yale University Graduate School (2006). Listed in ISI's database of Highly Cited Researchers - top 0.5% of most cited chemists in the world (2005). Gunther Laukien Prize, Experimental NMR Conference (2004). Founders Medal from the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems (2002). Flavelle Medal from the Royal Society of Canada (2002). Canada Research Chair (2000). Premier's Research Excellence Award (1999). Steacie Prize from the National Research Council of Canada (1999); MRC Scientist Award (1999); University of Toronto McLean Award (1998); Canada's Top 40 Under 40 Award (1998); Member Editorial Board of Journal of Biomolecular NMR (1997); International Research Scholar of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (1997); Member Editorial Advisory Board of Biochemistry (1996); Merck Frosst Award (1996); Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow (1995). (b. 1961).
Geoffrey Khan

Regius Professor of Hebrew, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge, UK. gk101@cam.ac.uk


Prof. Geoffrey A. Khan, Sackler Scholar 2015/2016, is the Regius Professor of Hebrew since 2012 and Chairman of the Faculty Board, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom. He has been at Cambridge since 1983, first researching the Cairo Genizah manuscripts, then Reader in Semitic Philology, 1999-2002 and Professor of Semitic Philology, 2002-2012. Prof. Khan received his B.A. in Semitic Languages (Hebrew, Aramaic, Arabic, Akkadian, Ethiopic), School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London in 1980, and his Ph.D. in 1984, later published as Studies in Semitic Syntax, (Oxford UP,1988). His honours include: Fellow, British Academy 1998. Honorary Fellow, Academy of the Hebrew Language 2011 and recipient of the Lidzbarski Gold Medal for Semitic philology, Deutsche Morgenl?ndische Gesellschaft 2004.

He has a broad interest in all periods of the Hebrew language, which include philological and linguistic studies of Hebrew, Aramaic and Arabic. He is Editor-in-Chief, Encyclopedia of Hebrew Language and Linguistics (4 vols. Boston: Brill, 2013), which contains about 1,000 articles on all periods, traditions and methodological approaches to the Hebrew language. A concise overview of his work on Tiberian Masoretic tradition appears in A Short Introduction to the Masoretic Hebrew Bible and its Reading Tradition (Gorgias, Piscataway, 2nd edition, 2013). His interest in Aramaic focuses on the documentation of modern spoken forms of the language, including fieldwork on the many endangered dialects, which were originally spoken in northern Iraq, southeastern Turkey and western Iran. He also published work on medieval Arabic and the history of the Arabic language, in particular the development of Judaeo-Arabic at various historical periods, including the modern spoken varieties. He has been commissioned by Oxford University Press to prepare the Oxford Grammar of Biblical Hebrew, a revised and expanded version of Gesenius's Hebrew Grammar 28th edition.

Prof. Mary-Claire King

American Cancer Society Professor, Depts. of Medicine (Medical Genetics) and Genome Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, mcking@u.washington.edu


Prof. MARY-CLAIRE KING, Sackler Lecturer 2012/2013, is American Cancer Society Professor in the Department of Medicine and the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. She was the first to prove that breast cancer is inherited in some families, as the result of mutations in the gene that she named BRCA1. In addition to the inherited breast and ovarian cancer, her research interests include genetics of hearing loss, the genetic bases of schizophrenia, and human genetic diversity and evolution. She also pioneered the use of DNA sequencing for human rights investigations, developing the approach of sequencing mitochondrial DNA preserved in human remains, then applying this method to the identification of kidnapped children in Argentina and subsequently to cases of human rights violations on six continents. Dr. King grew up in Chicago. She received her BA cum laude in Mathematics from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, her PhD in Genetics from the University of California at Berkeley, and her postdoctoral training at UC San Francisco. Her PhD dissertation with Allan Wilson in 1973 was the demonstration that DNA sequences of humans and chimpanzees are 99% identical. She was professor at UC Berkeley from 1976-1995 and at the University of Washington in Seattle since 1995. prof. King has served on the Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH, the National Commission on Breast Cancer of the President's Cancer Panel, the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), and multiple councils and study sections of the NIH and the National Academy of Sciences. She was consultant to the Commission on the Disappearance of Persons of the Republic of Argentina and carried out DNA identifications for the United Nations War Crimes Tribunals. She is President of the American Society of Human Genetics. Prof. King has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, to the Institute of Medicine, and as a foreign member of the French Academy of Sciences. She received the Clowes Award in Basic Research from the American Association for Cancer Research, the Genetics Award from the Gruber Foundation, the Weizmann Award for Women and Science, the Heineken Prize for Medicine from the Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor for Clinical Research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology Award for Basic Science, and the University of California Medal. She has received 13 honorary doctoral degrees, from Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Princeton, Brown, Leuven (Belgium) Tel Aviv (Israel), and Ben Gurion (Israel) Universities; the State University of New York; and Carleton, Smith, Bard, and Dartmouth Colleges. (b. 1946). Prof. Mary-Claire King is a 2018 Dan David Prize Laureate in the "Future - Personalized Medicine" field.

David Konstan
Comparative Literature, Brown University, Providence, USA
Professor DAVID KONSTAN, Sackler Scholar 2008/2009. The John Rowe Workman Distinguished Professor of Classics and the Humanistic Tradition since 1992 and Professor of Comparative Literature, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. He is also a member of the Graduate Faculty of Theatre, Speech and Dance since 2002. He has been Chair of the Department of Classics at different intervals. He has held visiting appointments at the University of Otago, the University of Edinburgh, the Universidade de Sao Paulo, the University of La Plata, the University of Natal, the University of Sydney, and the American University in Cairo. His books include: Roman Comedy (1983). Sexual Symmetry: Love in the Ancient Novel and Related Genres (1994), Greek Comedy and Ideology (1995), Friendship in the Classical World (1997), Pity Transformed (2001), The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks: Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature (2006), Aspasius, On Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics 1-4, 7-8 (translation, 2006), Lucrezio e la psicologia epicurea (2007) and Terms for Eternity (with Ilaria Ramelli, 2007). He is a member of numerous editorial boards and has been awarded various grants, including one from the Guggenheim Foundation. (b. 1940).
Heinz-Otto Kreiss
Department of Mathematics, University of California at Los Angeles, USA, hokreiss@nada.kth.se
Professor HEINZ-OTTO KREISS, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Professor of Mathematics, University of California at Los Angeles since 1987. Professor, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 1989-95. Consulting Activities: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory since 1998; Los Alamos National Laboratory 1978-98; ICASE, NASA Langley, 1978-96 and IBM, Yorktown Heights, 1990-95. Recipient of National Academy of Science Award 2002; Chosen to give the DiPerna Lecture 1999; Honorary Degree, ETH, Zurich 1998 and NASA's Public Service Medal 1993. Member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences and American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Editor, Numerische Mathematik, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, and other professional journals. (b. 1930's)
Douglas Koshland

Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Chair in the Biological Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA, koshland@berkeley.edu


Prof. Douglas Koshland, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Chair in the Biological Sciences and Professor of Genetics, Genomics, and Development at University of California, Berkeley. He earned his B.A. in Chemistry from Haverford College and his Ph.D. in microbiology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the guidance of David Botstein. He carried out post-doctoral work with Lee Hartwell (future Nobel Prize) at the University of Washington in Seattle and with Marc W. Kirschner at the University of California.  After opening his own laboratory at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, he became a Howard Hughes investigator, and continued to receive support from the Howard Hughes Institute for 15 years (1997-2012). In 2010 he moved to the University of California in Berkeley.

Prof. Koshland has published a great number of scientific articles and reviews, and has received numerous honors and prizes: he is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences from 2000, was elected member of the American Academy of Microbiology and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2009, and from 2010 he is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences. Prof. Koshland is a Board member of a number of prestigious and influential scientific organizations, as well as a Board member and Editor of leading scientific publications. He was invited to give keynote lectures in numerous national and inte

Jin Kang

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Department of Dermatology and Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics (LCSR, Johns Hopkins University
Maryland, USA, jkang@jhu.edu


Prof. Jin U. Kang, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is Jacob Suter Jammer Professor of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Professor of the Department of Dermatology, and Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics (LCSR) at the Johns Hopkins University.

 

Prof. Kang has published more than 160 journal papers and contributed to over 220 conference proceedings in the field of photonics.  He has pioneered development of endoscopic fiber-optic common-path optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-speed OCT for image guided therapy and leads the effort in intraoperative real-time OCT imaging.  His efforts are directed at enabling practical, usable, and enabling “smart” surgical tools that enhance surgeons’ freehand ability to achieve surgical objectives, diminish surgical risk, and improve outcomes. He also has notable accomplishments in the development of a wide range of fiber-optic devices and technologies, including development of fiber-optic lasers from single longitudinal mode tunable lasers to mode-locked femtosecond lasers.  He is credited for being the first to develop all-fiber multi-wavelength tunable lasers.  He has also made notable accomplishments in fundamental photonics research—where he was the first to experimentally demonstrate the existence of several important novel nonlinear effects such as Manakov Solitons and backward-propagating second-harmonic generation.

 

 Prof. Kang is the program chair of CLEO A&T, the sub-committee chair on CLEO Medical Applications, and a program committee member of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE) Biosensing group. He is a fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA), SPIE, and of American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). He was a topical editor of Optics Letters and is an editorial board member of the Optical Society of Korea. He served as a National Global R&D Advisory Committee Member of South Korea Ministry of Knowledge & Economy. He received his Ph.D. degree in Optical Sciences/EE from the College of Optics & Photonics in University of Central Florida in 1996.

 

L
Philip Leder
Head, Dept.of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA, leder@rascal.med.harvard.edu
Professor PHILIP LEDER, Sackler Scholar 1980/1981. Head, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Recipient of Harvey Prize, Israel Inst. of Tech. 1982. Elected as Councilor, National Academy of Sciences 1991-95. (b. 1934)
Evgeny Levin
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, USA
Professor EVGENY M. LEVIN, Sackler Scholar 1994/1995. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, USA. Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, 1985 - 1995. School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University since 1996. (b. 1940)
Henry Levin
Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, USA, HL361@columbia.edu
Professor HENRY M. LEVIN, Sackler Scholar 1984/1985. William Heard Kilpatrick Professor of Economics and Education and member of the Academic Senate, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York since 2003. David Jacks Professor of Education and Economics, Emeritus, Stanford University, California, 1968-99. (b. 1938)
Stanley Lieberson
Dept. of Sociology, Harvard University, USA, sl@wjh.harvard.edu
Professor STANLEY LIEBERSON, Sackler Scholar 1999/2000. Professor of Sociology (Abbott Lawrence Lowell Professor 1991 - 2006, Abbott Lawrence Lowell Research Professor 2007 - present), Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, elected 1983. National Academy of Sciences, elected 1992. Syndic, Harvard University Press, 1994 --1997. Fellow, Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality, Stanford University 2007 and American Philosophical Society, elected 2007. (b. 1933)
Richard a. Lang
Divisions of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center. richard.lang@cchmc.org
Prof. RICHARD A. LANG, Sackler Lecturer, 2013/2014. Dr. Lang received his BSc with Honors from The University of Melbourne in 1984 and his PhD from The University of Melbourne and the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in 1987. He then moved to the University of California San Francisco for Postdoctoral training with Nobel Prize winner Dr. J. Michael Bishop. In 1993, Dr. Lang took an Assistant Professorship at The Skirball Institute of New York University Medical Center. After becoming an Associate Professor at NYU, Dr. Lang was recruited to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in 2001 where he holds the Emma & Irving Goldman Scholar Endowed Chair in the Division of Pediatric Ophthalmology. Dr. Lang is Director of the Visual Systems Group and is the principle mentor for the 5 independent faculty of which it is comprised. Dr. Lang has a long history of mentoring trainees who establish successfully careers in academic science, industry and medicine. Dr. Lang has received numerous honors and awards including The Roy and Iris Simmons Prize (1984), the Searle Scholarship (1994), the Pearle Vision Foundation Award (2006), the Research to Prevent Blindness Lew R. Wasserman Merit Award (2007), the Scholars in Vision Science Lectureship, University of Pittsburgh medical Center (2009), the CCHMC Inaugural Mentoring Achievement Award (2011), an appointment to the National Eye Institute Board of Scientific Counselors (2012), and the Kimura Lectureship, University of California, San Francisco (2013).   Dr. Lang has broad research interests that include mechanisms of development in the visual and the vascular systems with an additional focus on myeloid cells. Among Dr. Lang's 100 plus papers, some of the most influential include, Lang and Bishop, Macrophages are required for cell death and tissue remodeling during development of the mouse eye (Cell, 1993), Chow et al., Pax6 induces ectopic eyes in a vertebrate (Development, 1999), Jung et al., Requirement of CD11c+ dendritic cells for in vivo CD8 T cell cross priming. (Immunity, 2002). Lobov, Rao et al, Wnt7b mediates macrophage-induced programmed cell death in patterning of the vasculature (Nature, 2005), Stefater et al., Regulation of angiogenesis by a non-canonical Wnt-Flt1 pathway in myeloid cells (Nature, 2011) and, most recently, Rao et al., A direct and melanopsin-dependent fetal light response regulates mouse eye development (Nature, 2013). Besides his current interests, Dr. Lang's future research will incorporate developmental and functional neurobiology. Dr. Lang is married to another scientist, Professor Rashmi S, Hegde, also at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. They have two daughters, Neharika, aged 9, and Nethra, aged 6.
Ludwik Leibler
Director, Soft Matter and Chemistry Laboratory, Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles, Paris (ESPCI) and an exceptional grade senior researcher at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), ludwik.leibler@espci.fr
Adjunct Professor LUDWIK LEIBLER, Sackler Lecturer 2013/2014. Prof. Leibler received his PhD in 1976 in Theoretical Physics from Warsaw University, and then spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow with Professor Pierre-Gilles de Gennes at the College de France. He is a researcher at CNRS initially in Strasbourg (1979-1984) then in Paris (1984-1996), where he made important contributions in the area of polymer self-assembly and dynamics, interfaces, gels and charged polymers. From 1996 to 2003 he was the founding director of a joint laboratory between CNRS and chemical company Elf-Atochem (later Arkema). This unique endeavour assembled researchers from academe and industry to tackle longstanding problems including the development of nano-structured materials, super-tough polymers or stimuli-responsive surfaces. Several of his discoveries led to now commercial materials. In 2001 he became Professor of Soft Matter and Chemistry at Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles in Paris where his research interests include design and synthesis of self-healing materials, supramolecular chemistry, composites, and design of stimuli responsive systems. His recent concept and realization of a self-healing supramolecular rubber that self-repairs by simple contact after being cut and of a new class of organic materials, called vitrimers, which are insoluble, but are malleable at high temperatures and solidify very progressively when cooled, like glass, spurred intensive research and development activity in numerous academic and industrial laboratories and attracted worldwide attention of public at large.   Prof. Leibler has received awards for teaching and research from various organizations including Polymer Physics Prize of American Physical Society, American Chemical Society Award in Polymer Chemistry, Medal of Innovation 2013 (France), Grand Prix of Fondation de la Maison de Chimie, Grand Prix IFP de l'Académie des Sciences and Grand Prix Pierre Sée of the French Chemical Society, Médaille d'Argent from CNRS. He is a Foreign Associate of National Academy of Engineering (USA). Prof. Leibler authored more than 47 patents and 177 papers which have been cited more than 11000 times.
Jeffrey Lesser
Director, Tam Institute for Jewish Studies, Emory University, Atlana, Georgia jlesser@emory.edu
Professor JEFFREY LESSER, Sackler Scholar 2010-2011. Director of the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies at Emory University and past-president of the Conference on Latin American History. He was appointed Winship Distinguished Research Professor in 2004. His research focuses on issues of ethnicity and national identity. Lesser received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from Brown University and his Ph.D. from New York University. He is the author of A Discontented Diaspora: Japanese-Brazilians and the Meanings of Ethnic Militancy, 1960-1980 (Durham: Duke University Press, 2007), Negotiating National Identity: Minorities, Immigrants and the Struggle for Ethnicity in Brazil (Duke University Press, 1999), winner of the Best Book Prize from the Brazil Section of the Latin American Studies Association, and Welcoming the Undesirables: Brazil and the Jewish Question (University of California Press, 1994) which won the Best Book Prize from New England Council on Latin American Studies. A Discontented Diaspora was published in Portuguese as Uma Diaspora Descontente: Os Nipo-Brasileiros e os Significados da Militancia Etnica, 1960-1980 (Sao Paulo: Editora Paz e Terra, 2008, Negotiating National Identity as Negociando a Identidade Nacional: Imigrantes, Minorias e a Luta pela Etnicidade no Brasil (Editora UNESP, 2001) and Welcoming the Undesirables as O Brasil e A Questao Judaica (Imago, 1995) and in Hebrew as Brazil Ve-Hashela Ha-Yehudit: Hagira, Diplomatia Ve-Deot Kdumot (Tel Aviv University Publishing Projects, 1997). Lesser has edited a number of volumes including Rethinking Jewish-Latin Americans (University of New Mexico Press, 2008; with Raanan Rein) Searching for Home Abroad: Japanese - Brazilians and Transnationalism (Duke University Press, 2003) and Arab and Jewish Immigrants in Latin America: Images and Realities (London: Frank Cass, 1998; with Ignacio Klich). Lesser spent the 2006-2007 academic year at Tel Aviv University as holder of the Fulbright Distinguished Chair of the Humanities. In 2001-2002 he was a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the University of Sao Paulo and he has held visiting professorships at the University of Campinas and the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He has received research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Ford Foundation, the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, the North-South Center and the Lucius N. Littauer Foundation.
Henry A. Lester
Bren Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering at the California Institute of Technology, lester@caltech.edu
Prof. HENRY A. LESTER, Sackler Lecturer 2013/2014. As a student at Harvard in the 1960s, Lester intended to pursue neuroscience as a career. Such a major did not yet exist but he reasoned that a background on fundamental science would prepare him for neuroscience research. He studied chemistry and physics, then earned a PhD in biophysics from the Rockefeller University. After two years at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, he came to Caltech in 1973. He also took a sabbatical year at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research interests have included ion channels and nicotine addiction. While its harmful effects are well documented, nicotine may also have the ability to protect neurons from the hysterical bursts of activity that destroys them in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Dr. Lester is also studying this poorly-understood phenomenon.   Lester's interests include psychiatric medication, and he served on the Advisory Council of the National Institute of Mental Health. He and his colleagues are now exploring whether the intracellular effects they have discovered for nicotine also apply to several other central nervous system drugs. He is therefore developing the field he calls 'inside-out' neuropharmacology. Dr. Lester is also active in education. He designed and taught a required course that introduced Caltech freshman non-biology majors to recent advances in biology, biomedical science, and applied biology. Dr. Lester now co-teaches a course focusing on the general principles of the organization and function of nervous systems. Dr. Lester also teaches an online course, Drugs and the Brain on Coursera, and recently issued roughly 4500 statements of completion to students from more than 75 countries. Dr. Lester has over 290 publications has served on numerous editorial and grant review boards has directed various projects and centers has served as Chair of the Caltech faculty and as President of the Biophysical Society and holds eight US patents. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and holds the K.S. Cole Award of the Biophysical Society.
Myron Levine, M.D., D.T.P.H.,
Center for Vaccine Dev., School of Medicine, Univ. of Maryland, USA
Professor MYRON M. LEVINE, Sackler Scholar 1987/1988. Director, Center for Vaccine Development, Co-founder in 1974, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. Head, Division of Geographic Medicine and Betsy & Simon Grollman Distinguished Professor, both in the Department of Medicine, and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology, and Epidemiology & Public Health. Head, Division of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Pediatrics, 1984-2005. Recipient of the 2012 Maurice Hilleman/Merck Award, American Society for Microbiology's premier award for major contributions to pathogenesis, vaccine discovery, vaccine development, and control of vaccine-preventable diseases. (b. 1944)
Bernard Lewis
Near Eastern Dept., Princeton Univ. & Instit. for Advanced Study Princeton, USA, dov30@juno.com
Professor BERNARD LEWIS, Sackler Institute Member from Academic Year 1980/1981. Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Emeritus Princeton University. Born in London, Professor Lewis received the B.A. degree in 1936 from the University of London and the Ph.D. degree from the same university in 1939. In 1940-41, he served in the British Army (RAC and IC) and from 1941 to 1945 was attached to a department of the Foreign Office. He was Professor of History of the Near and Middle East at the School of Oriental and African Studies in the University of London (1949-1974). He was appointed to the Cleveland E. Dodge Chair of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University in September 1974 and was named a long-term member of the Institute for Advanced Study in the same year. Professor Lewis retired from Princeton and the IAS in 1986. His publications include: The Political Language of Islam; Race and Slavery in the Middle East, Islam and the West; The Shaping of the Modern Middle East; Cultures in Conflict; The Middle East: A Brief History of the Last 2000 Years; The Multiple Identities of the Middle East; A Middle East Mosaic: Fragments of life, letters and history; Music of a Distant Drum: Classical Arabic, Persian, Turkish and Hebrew Poems. His works have been translated into more than twenty-five languages. His most recent books, What Went Wrong? Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response, 2002; The Crisis of Islam: Holy War and Unholy Terror, 2003; From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East was published by Oxford University Press, New York, in 2004. Professor Lewis has lectured in numerous countries including Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Canada, Mexico, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Iran, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Egypt, Sudan, Tunisia, Oman, Morocco and several European countries. Professor Lewis holds fifteen honorary doctorates and is a Fellow of the British Academy, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society, a corresponding member of the Institut de France, etc. (b. 1916)
Hermann Lichtenberger
Chair, Department for New Testament and Ancient Judaism University of Tübingen, Germany. hermann.lichtenberger@uni-tuebingen.de
Professor HERMANN LICHTENBERGER, Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Chair, Department for New Testament and Ancient Judaism and Director, Institut für antikes Judentum und hellenistische Religionsgeschichte, University of Tübingen, Germany. since 1993. Fellow, Institute for Advanced Studies, Hebrew University, Jerusalem from 2000-2001. Lady Davis Guest Professor, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 2005. Editor, Schriften des Institutum Judaicum Delitzschianum (1993-1997) and Editor in Chief, Jüdische Schriften aus hellenistisch-römischer Zeit, Gütersloh 1973ff. Co-Editor, Zeitschrift fuer neutestamentliche Wissenschaft, Zeitschrift fuer Althebraistik, Beihefte zur Zeitschrift fuer neutestamentliche Wissenschaft, Wissenschaftliche Monographien zum Alten und Neuen Testament, Commentaries on Early Jewish Literature. Fields of Research: Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, Early Jewish and Early Christian Apocalypticism, The New Testament in its Jewish and Pagan Context. (b. 1943).";
Lev Lipatov
I. Institute für Theoretisce Physik Universität Hamburg, Germany, lipatov@mail.desy.de
Professor LEV LIPATOV, Sackler Scholar 2009/2010. II. Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, University of Hamburg, Germany (2006-09), Director of the Theoretical Physics Department of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (1997-2009). Some previous positions: Institute of Particle Physics at Annecy (2005) DESY (2004), University of Pierre and Marie Curie (2003), University Montpellier-2, (1997-2002) DESY-Zeuthen and Hamburg University (1995-1996) Siegen and Darmstadt Universities (1993-1994), Washington University at Saint Louis (1992). Correspondent-member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (1997) Professor of Theoretical Physics (1990). Recipient: Alexander von Humboldt Prize, DESY, (1995-1996) Pomeranchuk prize, ITEP, Russia, (2001) Marie Curie Chair of Excellence, Hamburg University, (2006-2009). Fields of interests: Quantum Field Theory, high energy scattering in QCD. Number of scientific papers and monographs: more then 200. Main scientific achievements: DGLAP and BFKL equations (1972-1976) High order estimates in QFT (1977) Next-to-leading corrections to the BFKL equation,(1989-1998). Integrability of the BKP equations (1993). Maximal transcendentality principle in N 4 SUSY (2003) Anomalous dimensions of twist-two operators up to 4 loops (2003-2007). (b. 1940).
Jacek Lipkowski, FRSC.
Professor of Chemistry and Canada Research Chair in Electrochemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Physical and Engineering Science, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, jlipkows@uoguelph.ca
Professor JACEK LIPKOWSKI, FRSC, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Professor of Chemistry and Canada Research Chair in Electrochemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Recipient: Pergamon Gold Medal (International Society of Electrochemistry) 2005; Zawidzki Medal (Polish Chemical Society) 2004; Elected Fellow, Royal Society of Canada, 2004; Jaques Tacussel Prize (International Society of Electrochemistry) 1996; and Alexander von Humboldt Research Award, 1995. Council Member, Bioelectrochemical Society 2003-present; Discovery Grant Selection Committee of NSERC, Physical and Analytical Chemistry Committee, 2002-2006; and Associate Member, Commission on Electrochemistry (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry -IUPAC) 1999-2001. Associate Editor, Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, 1997-2003; and Co-editor of a series: "Advances in Electrochemical Science and Electrochemical Engineering" VCH-Wiley Pub. (b. 1944)
Harvey Lodish
Dept. of Biology, Whitehead Inst. for Biomedical Research, MIT, USA, lodish@wi.mit.edu
Prof. HARVEY F. LODISH, Ph.D., Sackler Visiting Scholar 1993/1994 and Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is a Founding Member in 1983, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research , Professor of Biology since 1976 and Professor of Biological Engineering since 1999, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Dr. Lodish joined the MIT faculty in 1968. Dr. Lodish is a leader in the field of molecular and cellular biology, and has identified and characterized numerous surface membrane proteins that play a role in blood development, cell signaling, glucose transport, and lipid metabolism. He earned his AB at Kenyon College and his PhD at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Lodish is a Member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1987, and served as Chair of the National Academy Section on Cellular and Developmental Biology. He is also a Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science since 1986 Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1999. Fellow, American Academy of Microbiology, and Associate (Foreign) Member, European Molecular Biology Organization. He received a MERIT award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and Guggenheim Fellowship 1977, the National Institutes of Health Research Career Development Award 1971-1975, American Diabetes Association William C. Stadie Award 1989, an honorary D.Sc. from Kenyon, and the 2010 Mentoring Award, American Society of Hematology. Dr. Lodish was on the Editorial Board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 1995-1999 and on the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science, 1991-1999. He was Editor, Molecular and Cellular Biology, 1981-1987 and member of editorial boards including: Journal of Cell Biology, the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and Nucleic Acids Research. Dr. Lodish is the lead author of the textbook, Molecular Cell Biology. The seventh edition was published in April 2012. Dr. Lodish has served on advisory panels for the U.S. National Institutes of Health and National Science Foundation and the American Cancer Society. He was Chair of the advisory board of the Division of Basic Sciences of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center and of the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Lodish was a founder and scientific advisory board member of Genzyme, Inc., Arris Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc, and Allozyne, Inc. and is Founding Chair, Scientific Advisory Board of the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, the group charged with oversight of the state's 10- year $1 billion investment in the life sciences. (b. 1941)
Jean- Marie Lehn

Director, Laboratoire de Chimie Supramoléculaire, ISIS, Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France. lehn@unistra.fr


Professor Jean-Marie Lehn, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, was born in Rosheim, France in 1939. In 1970 he became Professor of Chemistry at the Université Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg and from 1979 to 2010 he was Professor at the Collège de France in Paris. He is presently a Professor at the University of Strasbourg Institute for Advanced Study (USIAS). He shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987 for his studies on the chemical basis of “molecular recognition” (i.e. the way in which a receptor molecule recognizes and selectively binds a substrate), which also plays a fundamental role in biological processes.

Over the years Prof. Lehn's work led him to the definition of a new field of chemistry, which he has proposed calling “supramolecular chemistry” as it deals with the complex entities formed by the association of two or more chemical species held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces, whereas molecular chemistry concerns the entities constructed from atoms linked by covalent bonds. Subsequently, the area developed into the chemistry of "self-organization" processes and more recently towards "adaptive chemistry", dynamic networks and complex systems.

Prof. Lehn is the author of more than 950 scientific publications; he is a member of many academies and institutions, and has received numerous international honours and awards.

Tom Lubensky

Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia,  USA . tom@sas.upenn.edu


Prof. Tom Lubensky is a theoretical-condensed-matter physicist.  He received his undergraduate education from Caltech (class of 1964) and his Ph.D. from Harvard under the supervision of Paul Martin.  He took a one-year NSF postdoctoral Fellowship to France where he had his first exposure to liquid crystals in the research group of Pierre-Giles de Gennes.  He next spent one year as a postdoc with Leo Kadanoff at Brown University. In 1971, he moved to the University of Pennsylvania as Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics, where he has been ever since.   He served for eight years as Department Chair. He retired as the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Emeritus Professor in 2017.

 

Lubensky’s research activities span several subjects and fields.  He has made contributions to liquid crystals; phase transitions and critical phenomena; percolation; branched polymers and gels; quasicrystals; and soft-matter in general, including colloids, liquid crystal emulsions, and micro-rheology.  His current work is in the new field of topological mechanics. He is co-author with Paul Chaikin of the graduate text book, Principles of Condensed Matter Physics.

 

Lubensky is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Honored Member of the International Liquid Crystal Society, and a recipient of the American Physical Society’s Oliver E Buckley Condensed Matter Prize. 

 

 

Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz

Group Leader, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Research Campus, AshburnVirginia, USA. lippincottschwartzj@janelia.hhmi.org


Dr. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, Sackler Lecturer 2018/2019, is the Group Leader at HHMI – Janelia Research Campus. She attended Swarthmore College and Stanford University before receiving her PhD in Biology from Johns Hopkins University. After doing post-doctoral work under Richard Klausner at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, she established her own lab there, where she became a Distinguished NIH Investigator and Chief of the Section on Organelle Biology in the Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch.

 

Prof. Lippincott-Schwartz's research uses live cell imaging approaches to analyze the spatio-temporal behavior and dynamic interactions of molecules and organelles in cells. Her group has pioneered the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) technology for quantitative analysis and modeling of intracellular protein traffic and organelle biogenesis in live cells and embryos, providing novel insights into cell compartmentalization, protein trafficking and organelle inheritance. She created the photoactivatable GFP and co-developed the super-resolution imaging technique of photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). She introduced various PALM implementations to track single molecules, measure protein cluster patterns, perform multicolor labeling, count single molecules and measure receptor stoichiometry.

 

Prof. Lippincott-Schwartz is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, and the European Molecular Biology Organization. She is a fellow of the Biophysical Society, the Royal Microscopical Society and the American Society of Cell Biology. Her honors and awards include the Pearse Prize of the Royal Microscopy Society, the Newcomb Cleveland Prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Van Deenen Medal, and the Feodor Lynen Medal. She is co-author of the textbook “Cell Biology” and is past President of the American Society of Cell Biology.

 

M
Stjepan Marcelja
Dept. of Applied Math, Inst. of Adv. Studies, Australian Nat'l Univ., Canberra, Australia, stjepan.marcelja@anu.edu.au
Professor STJEPAN MARCELJA, Sackler Scholar 1999/2000. Professor, Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of Physical Sciences, Institute of Advanced Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Fellow, Australian Academy of Science (FAA), 1991. Corresponding Fellow, Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, 1997. (b. 1941)
Kevin Charles Marshall
School of Microbiology Univ. of New South Wales Kensington, New South Wales, Australia
Professor KEVIN CHARLES MARSHALL, Sackler Scholar 1987/1988. School of Microbiology, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia. (b. 1932)
Albert Messiah
Inst. de Res. Fondamentale, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, C.E.N. de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
Professor ALBERT MESSIAH, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1985/1986. Directeur de Recherches, Institut de Recherche Fondamentale, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, C.E.N. de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France and Professor of Physics, Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris. (b. 1921)
Eric Michielssen
Center for Computational Electromagnetics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA, emichiel@uiuc.edu
Professor ERIC MICHIELSSEN, Sackler Scholar 2002/2003. Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 2005-present. Associate Director, Center for Computational Electromagnetics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1995-present. Recipient, Union of Radio Scientists International - United States National Committee Henry G. Booker Fellow and Issac Koga Gold Medal Award, 1999. IEEE Fellow, 2002. (b. 1964)
Alexander Migdal
Theoretical Physics, Princeton University, USA
Professor ALEXANDER A. MIGDAL, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1989/1990 and 1992/93. Professor of Theoretical Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA. Cybernetics Council at the Academy of Sciences USSR and Head of the Laboratory of Computation and Physics, 1984-1987. (b. 1943)
Fergus Millar
The Oriental Institute, Oxford University, UK
Professor FERGUS MILLAR, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1994/1995. Camden Professor Emeritus of Ancient History, Brasenose College, Oxford University, England, 1984-2002. President, Classical Association, United Kingdom, 1992-1993. Sather Professor of Classical Literature, University of California, Berkeley, California, 2002-2003. Recipient, Kenyon Medal for Classical Studies,British Academy 2005. Knighted in the 2010 Queen's Birthday Honours. (b. 1935)
Henri Moscovici
Dept. of Mathematics, Ohio State Univ., Columbus, USA, henri@math.ohio-state.edu
Professor HENRI MOSCOVICI, Sackler Scholar 1995/1996. Department of Mathematics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. Recipient, College de France Medal, 1986 and Guggenheim Fellow, 1995/1996. (b. 1944)
Bernard Moss
Chief, Lab. of Viral Diseases, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA, mailto:bmoss@nih.gov
Professor BERNARD MOSS, M.D., Sackler Scholar 1995/1996. Chief, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Recipient, Invitrogen Eukaryotic Expression Award, 1991; Dickson Prize for Medical Research, 1988; and Solomon A. Berson New York University Medical Alumni Achievement Award, 1987. Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Infectious Disease Research, 2000. Member, National Academy of Sciences, 1987. (b. 1937)
K. Alex Müller
Dept. of Physics, IBM Zurich Res. Lab., Zurich Switzerland, ibmdiro@ch.ibm.com
Professor K. ALEX MÜLLER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1992/1993. Professor of Physics, IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, Zurich, Switzerland. Recipient of Nobel Prize in Physics 1987; Hewlett-Packard Europhysics Prize 1988; APS International Prize for New Materials Research 1988. Appointed Foreign Associate Member of the Academy of Sciences of the United States 1989. (b. 1927)
Jodi Magness
The Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. magness@email.unc.edu
Prof. JODI MAGNESS, Sackler Lecturer 2012/2013. The Kenan Distinguished Prof. for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Previous positions held: Associate/Assistant Prof. of Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology, Departments of Classics and Art History, Tufts University, Medford, MA, 1992-2002 and the Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology, Center for Old World Archaeology and Art, Brown University, Providence, RI, 1990-1992. She received her B.A., Archaeology and History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1977 and her Ph.D., Classical Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania, 1989. Prof. Magness research interests, which focus on Palestine in the Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods, and Diaspora Judaism in the Roman world, include ancient pottery, ancient synagogues, Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Roman army in the East. She has participated on 20 different excavations in Israel and Greece, including co-directing the 1995 excavations in the Roman siege works at Masada, co-directed excavations in the late Roman Fort, Yotvata, Israel, 2003-2007 and a new excavation project at Huqoq in Galilee, June 2011. Prof. Magness book The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2002) won the 2003 Biblical Archaeology Societys Award for Best Popular Book in Archaeology, 2001-2002 and was selected as an Outstanding Academic Book for 2003 by Choice Magazine. Magness' book The Archaeology of the Early Islamic Settlement in Palestine (Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2003) was awarded the 2006 Irene Levi-Sala Book Prize in the category of non-fiction on the archaeology of Israel. Her other books include Stone and Dung, Oil and Spit: Jewish Daily Life in the Time of Jesus (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, April 2011). Debating Qumran: Collected Essays on Its Archaeology (Leuven: Peeters, 2004). Hesed ve-Emet, Studies in Honor of Ernest S. Frerichs (co-edited with S. Gitin: Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1998), and Jerusalem Ceramic Chronology circa 200-800 C.E. (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic, 1993). Magness is currently at work on The Archaeology of the Holy Land 586 B.C.E. - 640 C.E. (under contract with Cambridge University Press). In addition, she has published numerous articles in journals and edited volumes.Her awarded fellowships include: American Council of Learned Societies and Byzantine Studies at Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, D.C. for research on The Archaeology of the Early Islamic Settlement in Palestine, 1997-1998 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship, College Teachers and a Skirball Visiting Fellowship, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies for research on The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, 2000-2001. Fulbright Lecturing Award through the United States-Israel Educational Foundation to teach two courses at the Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Spring 2005. School for Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ for research on Jewish Daily Life, 2007-2008. Chapman Family Faculty Fellowship, Institute for the Arts and Humanities at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for work on The Archaeology of the Holy Land, 2010-2011, National teaching honor: Archaeological Institute of America's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2008. She has produced a 36-lecture course on The Holy Land Revealed with The Teaching Companys Great Courses (released in December 2010).
Gerald Dennis Mahan
Distinguished Professor, Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA. gmahan@psu.edu
Prof. GERALD D. MAHAN, Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is a Distinguished Professor of Physics at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA since 2001. He graduated from Harvard College in Physics (Magna Cum Laude) in 1959, and earned his Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1964. Previously he held a joint appointment as a Distinguished Professor at the University of Tennessee and as a Distinguished Scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1984-2001. Early faculty appointments were at Indiana University from 1973-1984 and at the University of Oregon from 1967-1973. He worked at General Electric Research Center from 1964-1967, and then as a consultant from 1984-1995. Prof. Mahan is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and a member of the US National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences in Gothenburg, Sweden. His textbooks include: Many-Particle Physics (Plenum/Kluwer, First Edition 1981, 1983, 1986, Second Edition 1990, 1992. Third Edition 2000), Applied Mathematics (Kluwer/Plenum, 2002), Quantum Mechanics in a Nutshell (Princeton, 2009), Condensed Matter in a Nutshell (Princeton, 2010), and Solutions manual for Condensed Matter in a Nutshell (Princeton, 2010) eprint.
Zohar Manna
Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California since 1978.
Professor ZOHAR MANNA Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. Previously Professor, Applied Mathematics Department, Weizmann Institute, 1979. Rehovot, Israel from 1976-1995. Recipient of the Association for Computing Machinery Fellow (first group) Award, 1993; F. L. Bauer Prize (Technical University Munich, Germany) 1992, and Doctor Honoris Causa from Ecole Normale Superieure a Cachan, 2002. Associate Editor of Acta Informatica and Theoretical Computer Science Journal. Board Member of the United Nations Universities, and Institute for Software Technology. Research interests: Automated deduction: decision procedures, theorem proving, automated-based techniques; Semantics, specification, and verification of reactive, embedded, real-time, and hybrid systems; Systematic development, automatic synthesis and control; Temporal logic and its applications; Automatic and machine-s upported verification systems; and Static analysis. (b. 1939)
Susan Margulies

George H. Stephenson Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, USA, margulie@seas.upenn.edu


Professor SUSAN S. MARGULIES, Ph.D., Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is the George H. Stephenson Term Professor of Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA. Dr. Margulies is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), and the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). She currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Physiology and the Journal of Neurotrauma. she has served on grant review panels for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Margulies has received numerous awards and honors for her teaching and mentoring, including the S. Reid Warren Award for Distinguished Teaching, the Ford Motor Company Award for Faculty Advising, and the Association of Women in Science’s Elizabeth Bingham Award for the Advancement of Women in Science. Dr. Margulies has demonstrated her commitment to leadership through serving as Chair of the University of Pennsylvania Faculty Senate, Vice-President of the Penn Forum for Women Faculty, and as a member of the Board of Directors for the Biomedical Engineering Society, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and the Rosalind Franklin Society. Dr. Margulies' research program, which is currently funded primarily by the NIH, spans two distinct subfields within the broad areas of macro- and micro-scale injury in the lung and brain tissues from both traumatic brain injury and ventilator-induced lung injury. Although cells within the body routinely tolerate deformations during activities such as head turning or breathing, when cells are deformed beyond a safe limit or injury threshold, function and structure are altered temporarily or even permanently. The study of these thresholds allows a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury and ventilator-induced lung injury. The Injury Biomechanics Lab utilizes an integrated biomechanics approach consisting of experiments with clinically relevant animal models under controlled loading conditions that mimic rapid head rotation and ventilator usage, as well as computational models that complement the animal studies. Dr. Margulies' work has already yielded fundamental information about the mechanical properties of the brain and skull, in vivo deformations of the brain and lung, and the cellular response to deformations that accompany inflation of healthy and diseased lungs. Potential applications of her research include methods to prevent injury or reduce injury morbidity and approaches for therapeutic intervention.

Isaac Marks
Experimental Psychopathology, Institute of Psychiatry, Univ. of London, UK, I.Marks@iop.bpmf.ac.uk
Professor ISAAC MARKS MD, FRCPsych, Sackler Scholar 1998/1999. Professor of Experimental Psychopathology, Institute of Psychiatry, University of London 1978-2000. Hon. Consultant Psychiatrist, Bethlem Maudsley Hospital, 1968-2000. Chairman, British Association for Behavioural Psychotherapy, 1978 and Honorary Fellow 1993. President, Association of Behavioural Clinicians, 1988-1999. Instrumental in the creation of self-help organization "Triumph Over Phobia" (TOP UK) 1987. Visiting Professor, Imperial College, London, 2000-2003, ran a computer-aided self-help clinic and currently, Honorary Professor at the Free University of Amsterdam. (b. 1935)
Christopher F. Mckee
Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, cmckee@physics.berkeley.edu
Professor CHRISTOPHER F. MCKEE, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005 and Emilio Segré Distinguished Lectures in Physics, Endowed by Raymond and Beverly Sackler. Professor of Physics and of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley since 1978. Chair of the Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, 2000-2004. Miller Research Professor, 1984-1985, 1999, and 2004. Consultant, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory since 1970. Member of the National Academy of Sciences 1992, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 1999, Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 1996; Fellow of the American Physical Society 1985; and Guggenheim Fellow from 1998 - 1999. Speciality areas: Theory of the interstellar medium and of star formation.
Dr. Harvey T. McMahon
Tenured Group Leader, Medical Research Council, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hill Road, Cambridge, England hmm@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk
Dr. HARVEY T. McMAHON FRS, Sackler Lecturer 2012/2013, is Tenured Group Leader at the Medical Research Council, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (LMB), Cambridge, England since 2000, and staff scientist and group leader since 1995.   He received his B.A.Mod in Biochemistry from Trinity College, Dublin in 1987, and his Ph.D. in Neurochemistry from Dundee University, Scotland in 1990. His honours and awards include: Associate of the London College of Music - piano; European Molecular Biology Organization member since 2005; The Raymond and Beverly Sackler International Prize in Biophysics, 2006 (cell biophysics: regulation of membrane dynamics by proteins and molecular mechanisms of endocytosis); and fellow of The Royal Society since 2008   The Sackler prize was awarded to Dr. McMahon for his seminal contributions to the discovery of structural mechanisms of clathrin-mediated endocytosis - a process crucial for a broad range of vital cellular functions. Dr. McMahon's work is concerned with identification of a protein array that orchestrates the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles and the selection of the vesicle cargo. He resolved structures of a number of these proteins and revealed the related molecular mechanisms controlling protein-mediated membrane bending, budding and fission. Together, these results provide a framework for understanding the clathrin endocytic machinery.''At the LMB I changed my main focus of research from exocytosis to start working on molecular mechanisms of endocytosis. We initially started by applying structural and functional approaches to clathrin-mediated endocytosis to determine how this process works at a molecular level. With time we became interested in the ways in which proteins could effect membrane bending, and this naturally led us into defining novel mechanisms of vesicle budding and to the study of how many different pathways of vesicle trafficking can be coordinated. Thus we now study protein networks from a cell biologist's point of view. We have also recently been deciphering how membrane fusion is catalysed by proteins which effect membrane curvature stress at an appropriate focus point. These interests are highlighted in the accompanying resume of research.'' Dr. McMahon initiated and continues to run a competition with school students to develop a deeper interest in science. This is aimed at 16-18 year olds who study both science and art in their final years at secondary school. He was a school governor from 2005-2006 and has been involved in a range of other community initiatives, from providing holidays for mentally handicapped children, to providing support for international students in Cambridge. For details of his current research interests see: http://www.endocytosis.org/. These pages are maintained as an educational and social forum. Summaries of the contents of all these papers can be found onhttp://www.endocytosis.org/publica/papers.html. He also is a regular contributor to the online encyclopaedia Wikipedia. (b. 1965)
Matthew Stanley Meselson
Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, msm@wjh.harvard.edu
Professor MATTHEW STANLEY MESELSON, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1985/1986. Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of the Natural Sciences, Harvard University, 1976-present; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Fairchild Biochemical Laboratories, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Recipient: Molecular Biology Prize, N.A.S. 1963; Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and Immunology 1964; Public Service Award, Federation of American Scientists 1972; Lehman Award, New York Academy of Sciences 1975; Leo Szilard Award, American Physical Society 1978; Presidential Award, New York Academy of Sciences 1983; Freedom and Responsibility Award, American Association for the Advancement of Science 1990; Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal, Genetics Society of America 1995; Public Service Award, American Society for Cell Biology 2002; Albert Lasker Special Achievement Award in Medical Science 2004; Linus Pauling Award 2004; NYU Biology Award in Basic Sciences 2004. Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Member of honorary societies: Academie des Sciences (Paris), American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council on Foreign Relations, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences (USA), Royal Society (London), and Russian Academy of Sciences. (b. 1930)
Alex Mesoudi
PhD, Reader in Anthropology, Department of Anthropology and Centre for the Coevolution of Biology & Culture, Durham University, Durham, UK, a.a.mesoudi@durham.ac.uk
Professor ALEX MESOUDI, Ph.D., Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is a Reader [US Professor] in Anthropology, Department of Anthropology and Centre for the Coevolution of Biology and Culture, Durham University, U.K. since 2012. Previously he was a Lecturer [US Assistant Professor] in Psychology, Queens Mary University of London from 2008-2012. He received his BSc in Psychology, University College London, 2001 MSc in Evolutionary Psychology, University of Liverpool, 2002 and PhD, University of St Andrews, 2005. He held postdoctoral research positions at the University of Missouri, University of British Columbia and University of Cambridge. He is Treasurer/ Steering Committee member, European Human Behaviour and Evolution Association (www.ehbea.com) since 2011. ''My research interests lie in human cultural evolution and social learning using a range of methods, including lab experiments, mathematical models and computer simulations. My focus is in how small-scale cultural transmission biases - who copies what from whom, and how - translate into large-scale patterns of cultural change across societies and throughout history. Past work has examined the cultural evolution of prehistoric North American projectile points, the cultural dynamics of copycat suicide, cumulative changes in science and technology, and the transmission of gossip. Current projects involve studying cross-cultural variation in learning styles between the UK and China, studying learning dynamics in various migrant groups in the UK and beyond, and further examining how cultural transmission biases have influenced patterns in the archaeological record using combination of experiments and models. My book, ''Cultural Evolution'', was published by University of Chicago in 2011.''
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Amos Nur
Dept. of Geophysics, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford Univ., USA, Amos.Nur@stanford.edu
Professor AMOS NUR, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1983/1984. Professor of Geophysics, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. Chair, Geophysics Department 1986-1991 and from 1997- 2000. Recipient of the J. B. Macelwane Award, American Geophysical Union 1974; Newcomb Cleveland Prize AAAS 1975, SEG Distinguished Lecturer in 1997, and the AAPG Distinguished Lecturer in 1998. (b. 1938)
David I. Owen
Dept. of Near Eastern Studies, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, New York, USA, DIO1@cornell.edu
Professor DAVID I. OWEN, Sackler Scholar 1988/1989. Department of Near Eastern Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. Near Eastern and Judaic Studies; Director, Program of Jewish Studies; Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. Research interests: Ancient Near Eastern history and archaeology; Assyriology; Biblical history and archaeology; maritime history and archaeology. (b. 1940)
Robert Nerem
School of Mech. Eng., Dept. of Medicine, Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, USA, robert.nerem@ibb.gatech.edu
Professor ROBERT NEREM, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1993/1994. Incumbent of the Parker H. Petit Chair for Engineering in Medicine, School of Mechanical Engineering; Director, Georgia Tech & Emory Center for Regenerative Medicine, Professor Emeritus, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia; and Department of Pathology (Adjunct), University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA. Recipient of ALZA Distinguished Lecture, Biomedical Engineering Society 1991. International Editorial Board, Frontiers of Medical and Biological Engineering 1988 - present. (b. 1937)
Prof. Dirk Obbink
Department of Classical Studies (Papyrology and Greek Literature), University of Oxford, UK and (Papyrology), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, dirk.obbink@classics.oxford.ac.uk
Professor DIRK OBBINK, Sackler Lecturer 2006/2007. Professor of Classical Studies and Ludwig Koenan Collegiate Professor of Papyrology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor since 2003; University Lecturer in Papyrology and Greek Literature, University of Oxford, United Kingdom since 1995; and Student and Tutor in Greek, Christ Church, Oxford since 1995. Papyrologist: invented original method for reconstructing the carbonized scrolls from Herculaneum, 1987; Admiral in the Navy of the State of Nebraska, 2002; and recipient MacArthur Fellow, 2001. Fellow, Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, 2006-07; Co-founder and Trustee, The Herculaneum Society (with R. L. Fowler and N. G. Wilson), 2004; Founder and Curator, Archivum Societatis Herculanensis (ASH), 2004, and ITC Officer for creation of 'Papyrus Editor', 'Fragment Retreival System', and 'Virtual Library for Lost Books' by the ZAGREUS Project, University of Michigan/University of Oxford. (b. 1957).
Alan Oppenheim
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, USA, avo@mit.edu
Professor ALAN V. OPPENHEIM, Sackler Scholar 1983/1984 and 1992/1993. Currently Ford Professor of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and MacVicar Faculty Fellow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. MIT Professor 1964 - present. Guest Investigator, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA, June 1977 - present. Distinguished Professor Chair, 1990-1996. Recipient: IEEE Life Fellow, 2002; IEEE Third Millennium Medal, 2000; IEEE Signal Processing Society Award 1979; Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching, MIT, 1996; Baker Undergraduate Teaching Award, MIT, 1994; IEEE 1988 Education Medal. Member, National Academy of Engineering, (elected 1987). Honorary Doctorate, Tel Aviv University, 1995 (first time awarded in Engineering). Prof. Oppenheim's principal fields of interest are digital signal processing; nonlinear dynamics and chaotic signals; speech, image and acoustic signal processing; and biological signal processing. He has co-authored several widely used textbooks and many journal articles. (b. 1937)
Henri Orland
Head of the Service de Physique Théorique, CEA-Saclay, France henri.orland@cea.fr
Professor HENRI ORLAND, Sackler Scholar 2010/2011. Specialist of Statistical Physics and its applications to biological systems. Head and Directeur de Recherche, Institut de Physique Theorique Commissariat ? l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France since 2004. Chairman, C3 Commission of the IUPAP (Statistical Physics), Vice-President of the IUPAP since 2008. He was a Visiting Scientist at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, California from 2000-2001, a Visiting Professor at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel in 1987 and a Visiting Professor at MIT from 1981-1983. Editorial positions include: ''The European Physical Journal B'' from 1997-2004 and Editor at ''Physics Reports'' since 2003. Author of approximately 160 peer-reviewed published scientific articles and one book, ''Quantum Many-Particle Systems'' (Frontier of Physics, Addison-Wesley 1987). (b. 1952)
Tetsuya Osaka
Provost, Director of Research Promotion Division, Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, osakatet@waseda.jp
Professor TETSUYA OSAKA, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Provost, Director of Research Promotion Division, Professor of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan from 2002 - 2006 (June). Recipient and Fellowships: Member of the Scientific Advisory Board (Singapore), 2004; The Chemical Society of Japan Award, 2004; IUPAC Fellow, 2004; Kato Memorial Award, 2003; ECS Fellow, 2002; IEEE Fellow, 2002; Society Award of Electrochemical Society Japan, 2001; International Society of Electrochemistry, Pergamon Gold Medal Award, 1999. President (Elect) of The Electrochemical Society, Japan 2004-present; Vice-President of International Society of Electrochemistry, 2003-present; and Executive Editor, The Chemical Record, 2000-present. (b. 1947)
Douglas Osheroff
Departmentt of Applied Physics,Stanford University, California, USA,
Professor DOUGLAS D. OSHEROFF, Sackler Lecturer 2010/2011, is the J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor in Physics and Professor of Applied Physics at Stanford University, Stanford, California since 1987. He served as the Department Chair from 1993-1996 and the Head of the Solid State and Low Temperature Research Department from 1981-1987. Previously he worked in industry as a member of AT&T Bell Laboratories' technical staff from 1972-1987. Prof. Osheroff's research is focused on phenomena that occur at extremely low temperatures. Research efforts center around studies of quantum fluids and solids and glasses at ultra-low temperatures. Current work in quantum fluids and solids includes studies of transport properties in nuclear magnetically ordered solid 3He, studies of the B phase nucleation in superfluid 3He, and experimental searches for new magnetically ordered two dimensional phases of both solid and liquid 3He on graphite surfaces. The work involving glasses is intended to elucidate the nature of two level systems in amorphous materials at ultra-low temperatures, and to develop new low heat capacity/high resolution thermometers for use in the 1 to 10 mK temperature range.   He is a Co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics (with David M. Lee and Robert C. Richardson) in 1996 for their discovery of superfluidity of Helium-3; in addition he is recipient of the the MacArthur Prize Fellow in 1981 and the Walter J. Gores award for excellence in teaching in 1991. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Member of the National Academy of Sciences. He was selected to serve on the Space Shuttle Columbia investigation panel, serving much the same role as Richard Feynman did on the Space Shuttle Challenger panel. He currently serves on the board of advisors of Scientists and Engineers for America, an organization focused on promoting sound science in American government.
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George Papanicolaou
papanico@georgep.Stanford.EDU Dept. of Mathematics, Stanford University, USA, papanico@georgep.Stanford.EDU
Professor GEORGE C. PAPANICOLAOU, Sackler Scholar 2000/2001. Robert Grimmett Professor of Mathematics, 1997 - present, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Director, Division of Wave Propagation and Applied Mathematics, Courant Institute 1979-1993. Professor, Stanford University, 1993-97. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Scineces. Member, U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Recipient, SIAM von Neumann Prize 2006. (b. 1943)
Robert C. T. Parker
Wykeham Professor of Ancient History, New College, Oxford University, UK, robert.parker@new.ox.ac.uk
Prof. ROBERT C. T. PARKER, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016, Wykeham Professor of Ancient History, New College, Oxford University, United Kingdom.
Stanley Peters
Center for the Study of Language & Information, Stanford University, USA, website: peters@csli.stanford.edu
Professor STANLEY PETERS, Sackler Scholar 1985/1986. Center for the Study of Language and Information(CSLI), Stanford University, Stanford, California since 1983 and Chair of the department from 1996-2002, and now heads the Computational Semantics Laboratory at the CSLI. Main work focuses on logical analysis of meaning in natural languages and computational processing thereof, including mathematical theories of natural and programming language. (b. 1941)
Robert Pindyck
Applied Economics, Sloan School of Management, M.I.T., Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, rpindyck@mit.edu
Professor ROBERT S. PINDYCK, Sackler Scholar 1985/1986 and 1987/1988. Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi Professor of Economics and Finance, Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. (b. 1945)
David Pine
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, New York University, USA pine@nyu.edu
Prof. DAVID J. PINE, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016, Professor of Physics, as well as of Mathematics, New York University, Chair of NYU's Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Fellow Professor at Sungkyunkwan University, in South Korea.
Richard Pipes
Department of History, Harvard Univ., USA
Professor RICHARD PIPES, Sackler Scholar 1988/1989. Baird Professor Emeritus of History (Russian), Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Science; Member, Council Foreign Relations. Recipient of the 2007 National Humanities Medal Awarded by President Bush (National Endowment for the Humanities); Truman-Reagan Medal of Freedom by the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation 2009, and the Brigham-Kanner Prize by the William & Mary Law School 2009; Bene Merito Medal by the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs 2010. Member of the Russian Valdai Discussion Club since 2010. (b. 1923)
Leonid Pastur
Dept. of Mathematics, Universite Paris VII, France, pastur@math.jussieu.fr
Professor LEONID PASTUR, Sackler Scholar 2001/2002. Head, Department of Theoretical Physics, B.I. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics & Engineering, Kharkov, Ukraine, 2003-present. Department of Mathematics, U.F.R. des Mathematiques, Universite Paris VII, Paris, France, 1995-2004. Chairman, Ukranian Fund of Fundamental Researches, Kiev, Ukraine, 1994-1996. Member Editorial Board, International Journal of Low Temperature Physics and Mathematical Physics, Analysis and Geometry, 1994-present time; and Geometrical and Functional Analysis, 2001-present time. Recipient, Academician of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1990; Member of the Executive Committee of the International Association of the Mathematical Physics, 1997-2003. (b. 1937)
Anthony Perl
Urban Studies and Political Science, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, aperl@sfu.ca
Prof. ANTHONY PERL, Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is Professor of Urban Studies and Political Science, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Fellow of the Post-Carbon Institute and Adjunct Professor of Urban Studies, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia. Previously he worked at the University of Calgary, City University of New York, and Universite Lumiere, Lyon, France. He received his A.B., Harvard University cum laude in Government, 1984 followed by his MA, 1985 and Ph.D., 1993, University of Toronto in Political Science. His research crosses disciplinary and national boundaries to explore policy decisions made about transportation, cities and the environment. He has published in dozens of scholarly journals including: Energy Policy, Transportation Research, Transportation Quarterly, World Transport Policy and Practice, Journal of Air Transport Management, Transportation Research Record, Journal of Public Policy, Canadian Public Policy, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Journal of Urban Technology, Canadian Journal of Political Science and Scientific American. His work has been awarded prizes for outstanding papers presented at the World Conference on Transport Research and the Canadian Transportation Research Forum. He has also produced five books. The Politics of Improving Urban Air Quality, co-edited and co-authored (Edward Elgar, U.K., 1999). New Departures: Rethinking Rail Passenger Policy in the Twenty-First Century (University Press of Kentucky, 2002). The Integrity Gap: Canada's Environmental Policy and Institutions, co-authored and co-edited (University of British Columbia Press, 2003). Transport Revolutions: Moving People and Freight Without Oil, co-authored (Earthscan, 1st ed., New Society Publishers, 2nd ed.), co-authored Studying Public Policy: Policy Cycles and Policy Subsystems, (Oxford University Press, 3rd ed.) Perl has advised governments in Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, and the United States on transportation and environmental research and policy development. He served on the Board of VIA Rail, Canada’s national passenger railway for more than four years and on the Selection Committee of Transport Canada’s Urban Transportation Showcase Program. Until April 2014, he chairs the Rail Group of the U.S. Transportation Research Board, a division of the National Research Council.
Daniel Samuel Pine
National Institute of Mental Health (NIH) (NIMH), Bethesda, MD USA, pined@mail.nih.gov
Professor DANIEL SAMUEL PINE, Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Chief, Emotional Development and Affective Neuroscience Branch, Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, IRP, NIMH since 2006; Chief, with Tenure, Section on Development and Affective Neuroscience, IRP, NIMH since 2000; Chief of Child and Adolescent Research with Tenure, IRP, NIMH since 2000; Adjunct Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons/New York State Psychiatric Institute and New York University Child Study Center since 2000. Recipient (selection): First Prize, American Psych. Association - N.Y. Dist. Residents Research Awards 1994; Honorable Mention, Robinson-Cuningham Award for Outstanding Research Study, Amer Acad Child Adolescent Psychiatry 1995; Scientist Development Award for Clinicians, NIMH 1996; Eli Lily Research Award in Child Psychiatry, Columbia University; Mead Johnson Travel Award, American College of Neuropsycho-pharmacology 1996; Robinson-Cuningham Award for Outstanding Research Study, Amer Acad Child Adolescent Psychiatry 1996; NIMH Award (R29-MH57503) to study selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor?s effects on anxiety and breathing in children 1997; Gertrude Rogers Greenblatt Memorial Lectureship, UCLA Dept. Psychiatry 2003; Outstanding Mentor Award & Mentor, Presidential Scholar Award, American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 2003; Distinguished Mentor Award, National Institute of Health-Pre-IRTA Committee, Intramural Research Program 2003; Elected Member, American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 2002. Appointed Editor, Journal of Child Psychology, Psychiatry, & Allied Disciplines 2003. (b. 1963)";
Daniel Portnoy
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and The School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, portnoy@uclink.berkeley.edu
Professor DANIEL PORTNOY, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and The School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA since 1997 and Affiliate Member, Division of Immunology and Pathogenesis, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, UC Berkeley since 2003. From 1988 to 1997 he had at the Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA. Honors include: MERIT Award, NIAID, NIH in 1995, Eli Lilly and Company Research Award in Microbiology and Immunology in 1996. Elected Chair, Gordon Conference on Microbial Toxins & Pathogenicity and Elected Fellow, American Academy of Microbiology in 2000. Honorary Doctorate, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umea University, Sweden in 2001 and Senior Scholar Award, Ellison Foundation in 2004. Editorial positions: Infection and Immunity, Editorial Board member since 1990 Cellular Microbiology, Editorial Board member since 1990 Infection and Immunity, Minireview Editor from 1999-2003. Chair, Special Emphasis Panel, Anthrax program project grants (ZRG1 EVR 40 M, NIH) April 25, 2003. Chair, Center for Microbiology, UC Berkeley since 2003 and Chair, Review Panel, HHMI International Research Scholars Program in 2005. (b. 1956)
Rudolf Podgornik

Department of physics, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, rudipod@gmail.com


Prof. Rudolf Podgornik, Sackler Lecturer 2016/2017, is professor of Physics (Faculty of Mathematics and Physics) and of Biophysics (Medical Faculty) at the University of Ljubljana and the head of the research program Biophysics of polymers, membranes, gels, colloids and cells, financially supported by the Slovene Agency for Research and Development. Since 2011 he is also adjunct professor at the Physics Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst and since 2013 an adjunct professor at the Materials Science & Engineering Department at the Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland. He was a Senior Staff Member at the Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana (1990-1992), and until 2010 he was an adjunct researcher at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

 

His field of research is soft matter, the physics of coulomb fluids, macromolecular interactions and in particular the Lifshitz theory of dispersion interaction, the physics of membranes, polymers and polyelectrolytes and especially the physics of DNA.

 

Prof. Podgornik won the Kidric national award for scientific accomplishments (Ljubljana, Slovenia, 1991), the DCRT/NIH Director's award for recognition and appreciation of special achievement (NIH, USA, 1995) and the  Zois national award for excellence in scientific research – the highest award for scientific achievement in Slovenia, which can be obtained only once in a lifetime (1999).


 

His research was supported by the EU Sixth Framework Programme research grant, Slovenian-Israeli Research Cooperation Grant with D. Harries from Hebrew University, the Slovene research agency and the Leverhulme Trust and by the Long Range van der Waals - London Dispersion Interactions For Biomolecular and Inorganic Nanoscale Assembly.

 

Prof. Podgornik published more than two hundred refereed papers which were cited over 4,300 times – H-index=37 (WOS Oct 2015), and over 5,100 citations – H-index=42 (Google scholar Oct 2015). He is the co-author of two Textbooks in Slovene: Elektromagnetno polje, (Matematika - fzika, 51). Ljubljana: DMFA - založništvo, 2012. (Electromagnetic feld) and Rešene naloge iz mehanike kontinuov, (Zbirka izbranih poglavij iz fzike, 35). Ljubljana: DMFA - založništvo, 2001(Solved exercises in continuum mechanics). And he is also the co-editor of two books: Electrostatic effects in soft matter and biophysics: proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute, Les Houches, France, 1-13 October 2000 and of Electrostatics of soft and disordered matter. Singapore: Pan Stanford, 2014.

Thomas Petes

Minnie Geller Professor of Genetics, Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, tom.petes@duke.edu


Prof. Thomas D. Petes, Sackler Lecturer 2016/2017, is the Minnie Geller Professor of Genetics in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University School of Medicine. He received his Sc.B. in Biology (cum laude) from Brown University and his Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of Washington. He did post-doctoral research with D. H. Williamson at the National Institute for Medical Research in London and he was a post-doctoral researcher with David Botstein at M.I.T. He was an Assistant, Associate, and full Professor at the University of Chicago before moving to the University of North Carolina in 1988. In 2004, he moved to Duke University to become Chair of the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, completing his term as Chair in 2009.

 

For his whole career, Prof. Petes has been interested in mechanisms that alter the eukaryotic genome. In particular, he has investigated mutants that destabilize the yeast genome as a model for understanding the genetic instability associated with cancer. He has also contributed to our current knowledge of the mechanisms of meiotic and mitotic recombination.

 

Prof. Petes is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology. He was Vice President (2001) and President (2002) of the Genetics Society of America (GSA) and in 2013 he was awarded the Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal from the GSA for lifetime contributions to the field of Genetics.

Thomas Pavel

Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago, Illinois, USA,  tpavel@uchicago.edu


Prof. Thomas Pavel, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, serves as the Gordon J. Laird Distinguished Service Professor in the Departments of Romance Languages and Comparative Literature, as well as in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.



Born in Romania, he earned his MA at the University of Bucharest and worked as research associate at the Center for Phonetics of the Romanian Academy.  After getting a Doctorat 3e cycle at the Université de Paris 3, he has taught at the University of Ottawa, Université du Québec à Montréal, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Princeton University.  He served several times as visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, in 2004-2005 he held the International Chair at the Collège de France and in 2010-2011 he was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin. 


Prof. Pavel is the author of Fictional Worlds (Harvard University Press, 1986, Italian translation, Einaudi, 1992, Spanish translation 1996, Czech translation 2012, Chinese translation forthcoming); The Spell of Language:  Post-structuralism and speculation (Blackwell, 1989, new, revised edition University of Chicago Press, 2001, French edition, Minuit, 1988, Portuguese translation 1990); L’Art de l’éloignement.  Essai sur l’imagination classique (Paris: Folio, Gallimard, 1996) and La Pensée du roman (Paris: Gallimard, 2003, Spanish translation 2004, Romanian translation 2005, new, fully revised French version, Folio, Gallimard, 2015, English translation under the title The Lives of the Novel, Princeton University Press, 2013, Italian translation, Mimesis, 2015, Japanese translation forthcoming).

   

 

 

 

Thomas Pavel

Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, University of Chicago, Illinois, USA,  tpavel@uchicago.edu


Prof. Thomas Pavel, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, serves as the Gordon J. Laird Distinguished Service Professor in the Departments of Romance Languages and Comparative Literature, as well as in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.



Born in Romania, he earned his MA at the University of Bucharest and worked as research associate at the Center for Phonetics of the Romanian Academy.  After getting a Doctorat 3e cycle at the Université de Paris 3, he has taught at the University of Ottawa, Université du Québec à Montréal, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Princeton University.  He served several times as visiting professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, in 2004-2005 he held the International Chair at the Collège de France and in 2010-2011 he was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin. 


Prof. Pavel is the author of Fictional Worlds (Harvard University Press, 1986, Italian translation, Einaudi, 1992, Spanish translation 1996, Czech translation 2012, Chinese translation forthcoming); The Spell of Language:  Post-structuralism and speculation (Blackwell, 1989, new, revised edition University of Chicago Press, 2001, French edition, Minuit, 1988, Portuguese translation 1990); L’Art de l’éloignement.  Essai sur l’imagination classique (Paris: Folio, Gallimard, 1996) and La Pensée du roman (Paris: Gallimard, 2003, Spanish translation 2004, Romanian translation 2005, new, fully revised French version, Folio, Gallimard, 2015, English translation under the title The Lives of the Novel, Princeton University Press, 2013, Italian translation, Mimesis, 2015, Japanese translation forthcoming).

   

 

 

 

Derek Penslar

Gustavus Adolphus Pfeiffer Professor; Chair, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, Massachusetts, USA. dpenslar@fas.harvard.edu


Prof. Derek Penslar, Sackler Lecturer 2018/2019, is the William Lee Frost Professor of Modern Jewish History at Harvard University and the Samuel Zacks Professor of Jewish History at the University of Toronto. He approaches modern Jewish history from a transnational and global perspective. His work encompasses the history of the Jews in modern West and Central Europe, North America, and Israel. He is particularly interested in the relationship between modern Israel and diaspora Jewish societies, global nationalist movements, European colonialism, and post-colonial states.

 

Prof. Penslar has taught at Indiana University, Bloomington, the University of Toronto, and Oxford University, where he served as the inaugural Stanley Lewis Professor of Modern Israel Studies from 2012 until 2016. He co-edits (with Anita Shapira) The Journal of Israeli History and serves on the editorial boards of The Journal of Jewish Studies, Jewish Social Studies, and Israel Studies. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the American Academy for Jewish Research.

 

Penslar's books include Zionism and Technocracy: The Engineering of Jewish Settlement in Palestine, 1870-1918 (1991); In Search of Jewish Community: Jewish Identities in Germany and Austria, 1918-1933 (1998, co-edited with Michael Brenner), Shylock’s Children: Economics and Jewish Identity in Modern Europe (2001); Orientalism and the Jews (co-edited with Ivan Kalmar, 2004),  Israel in History: The Jewish State in Comparative Perspective (2006); The Origins of the State of Israel 1882-1948: A Documentary History (with Eran Kaplan, 2011) and Jews and the Military: A History (2013). He is currently finishing Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader (for Yale University Press’ “Jewish Lives” series) and starting research for a new book, Zionism: An Emotional State (for Rutgers University Press’ “Keywords in Jewish Studies” series).

R
Norman Ramsey
Lyman Physics Laboratory, Harvard University, USA, mailto:ramsey@physics.harvard.edu
Professor NORMAN F. RAMSEY, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1995/1996. Higgins Professor of Physics, Lyman Physics Laboratory, Emeritus Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Recipient, Nobel Prize in Physics, 1989; Einstein Award, National Medal of Science. President of American Physical Society, 1978-1979; and Universities Research Association, 1966-1982, which operates Fermi Lab; and chaired Governing Board of American Institute of Physics, 1981-1985. Honoris Causa, Harvard University 2006. (b. 1915)
Eugene Roberts
Dept. of Neurobiochemistry, City of Hope/Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, California, USA, ERoberts@coh.org
EUGENE ROBERTS, Ph.D. Sackler Scholar 1981/1982. Director Emeritus, Neurobiochemistry, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, 2000-present; Director and Distinguished Scientist, Department of Neurobiochemistry, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, 1983-1999. Member, United States National Academy of Sciences, 1988 and American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1995. (b. 1920)
John Roth
Division of Biological Sciences, Section of Microbiology, University of California at Davis, USA, jrroth@ucdavis.edu
Professor JOHN ROTH, Sackler Scholar 1997/1998. Distinguished Professor of Biology, Division of Biological Sciences, Section of Microbiology, University of California at Davis. First annual Governors Medal for Science and Technology Utah 1987; Member, National Academy of Sciences 1988; Rosenblatt Prize University of Utah 1990, Honorary Doctorate Umeå University, Sweden 1997. Recipient: Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal, Genetics Society of America 2009 and Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science 2009. (b. 1939)
Tessa Rajak
Professor Emeritus of Ancient History, University of Reading and Senior Research Fellow, Somerville College, Oxford, UK, t.rajak@reading.ac.uk
Prof. TESSA RAJAK, Sackler Scholar 2011/2012, is Prof. of Ancient History Emeritus in the University of Reading. She currently works at Oxford, where she is Senior Research Fellow of Somerville College and a Member of the Jewish Studies Unit at the Oriental Institute. She is also a Visiting Prof. in the History Department at University College London. She has recently held visiting Prof. ships at Yale University, Macquarie University in Sydney and the Humboldt University and at the Freie Universitat in Berlin, as well as research fellowships in Princeton and Jerusalem. Between 2001 and 2006, she co-directed a major research project on the Greek Bible in the Graeco-Roman World for the Parkes Institute for Jewish/non-Jewish relations at Southampton University. Her latest book Translation and Survival: the Greek Bible of the Ancient Jewish Diaspora was shortlisted for the Runciman Prize. Among her other books are Josephus: the Historian and his Society (second edition, Duckworth, 2002), and The Jewish Dialogue with Greek and Rome (Brill, 2001). She has also written numerous articles and lectures widely to all sorts of audiences. She is now working on a number of projects, principally an introduction, translation and commentary on a Jewish martyr text, the Fourth Book of Maccabees and a book on the reception of Josephus through the ages for Harvard University Press. (b. 1946)
Didier Raoult, M.D.
Head, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Unité des Rickettsies Faculté de Médecine, Marseille, France, didier.raoult@gmail.com
Professor DIDIER RAOULT, M.D., Ph.D., Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. Full Professor at Marseille School of Medicine and is Director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory for the University Hospitals since 1994. He served as President of the Universite de la Mediterranee in Marseille from 1994 to 1999. He is the co-founder of the European Study Group of Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, Coxiella (EUWOG) for which he is the immediate past president. He is also the founder of the National Rickettsia Reference Center, WHO Collaborative Center, which is the largest laboratory in the world in the field of Rickettsial diseases, and head since 1988. He is also head of the French National Reference Center for Rickettsial Diseases in Marseille since 1987. Prof. Raoult is a graduate of the Marseille Medical School and also performed internal medicine and infectious disease specialty training there. He received degrees in bacteriology and virology in 1981 and parasitology in 1982. He obtained his Ph.D. in microbiology at the Montpellier Medical School, France, in 1985. Some of his professional memberships inclued: Fellow Infectious Diseases Society of America since 1995; Editor in chief, Clinical Microbiology and Infection; Editor, European J. Clinical Microbiology. Infectious Disease; Associate editor, Emerging Infectious Diseases; and Associate Editor, European J. Epidemiol. His honors include: Award of the French Foundation for Research, 2003; J. Smadel Lecture IDSA, 2003; Award of Excellence European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 2002; Over Sea Sciences, Royal Belgian Tropical Medicine Society, 2002; E. Garner King Memorial lecture, Edmonton, CA, 2002; and Pfizer, IDCP Discovery series 2000. He has mentored 66 physicians and 13 Ph.D.s in addition to numerous postdoctoral students from all over the world. He has authored over 900 scientific papers and has written 60 book chapters in all of the major textbooks of medicine and infectious diseases. He has edited or authored 11 books in infectious diseases. He participated in the first isolation of Tropheryma whippeli, Rickettsia africae, R. mongolotimonae and R. felis and has described several new Rickettsial diseases. Source: Antimicrobe, Author's section http://www.antimicrobe.org/authors/didier_raoult.asp' Antimicrobial Agents and Intracellular Pathogens, by Didier Raoult http://books.google.co.il/books?id=B9BbXGvpTYIC&printsec=frontcover&hl=en#PPP12,M1
Martin Rein
Deptartment of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT, Cambridge, USA, mrein@mit.edu
Professor MARTIN REIN, Sackler Scholar 2002/2003. Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 1970 - present. Recipient, Permanent Research Fellow, Institute for Sociology: Research Group on Aging and the Life Course, Free University, Berlin, Spring 1998; Albert Einstein Fellow, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Spring 1983. Listed in: Contemporary Authors, 1980 and Who Who's in America, 1972 to Present. Prof. Rein's current research includes comparative social welfare policy, social security systems, and the books, "One Model or More", Cambridge University Press (forthcoming), "Oxford Handbook of Public Policy" (edited with Michael Moran and Robert E. Goodin), Oxford University Press and "The Political Economy of Pension Reform", Cambridge University Press (forthcoming). (b. 1928)
Prof. Peter J. Rhodes
Honorary Professor and Emeritus Professor of Ancient History, Department of Classics, University of Durham, Durham, UK p.j.rhodes@durham.ac.uk
Prof. PETER JOHN RHODES (b. 1940), Sackler Lecturer 2012/2013. Honorary Prof. and Emeritus Prof. of Ancient History, University of Durham, England, since 2005 and Personal Chair from 1983-2005. Some of his previous appointments include: Member, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, 1988-89, Fulbright-Hays Scholar, Visiting Fellow, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 1993, Visiting Fellow, All Souls College, Oxford, 1998, Langford Family Eminent Scholar, Florida State University, Tallahassee, 2002 and Short-Term Invitation Fellow for Research , Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 2005. His honors include: Fellow, British Academy, 1987, in the old Ancient History section to 1994 and in the Classical Antiquity section from 1994 (Chairman, 2002-05), Foreign Member, Royal Danish Academy, 2005 and Fellow, Fondazione Lorenzo Valla, 2010. His published books include: "The Athenian Boule", O.U.P. 1972 (revised reprint 1985), "A Commentary on the Aristotelian Athenaion Politeia", O.U.P. 1981 (reissued with new Addenda 1993), "Aristotle: The Athenian Constitution (Penguin Classics)", Penguin 1984 (revised reprint 2003), "The Greek City States: A Source Book", Croom Helm (and in U.S.A. U. of Oklahoma P.) 1986, 2nd edition C.U.P. 2007 and Modern Greek translation 2011, editions of Thucydides II / III/ IV. 1 -V. 24, Aris & Phillips 1988/94/98, "The Decrees of the Greek States" (with D. M. Lewis), O.U.P. 1997," Greek Historical Inscriptions, 404-323 B.C." (with R. Osborne), O.U.P. 2003 "A History of the Classical Greek World, 478-323 B.C.", Blackwell 2005, 2nd edition 2010, Polish translation 2010.
Paul Robinson
Law School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, website: Publications list & downloadable articles: phrobins@law.upenn.edu
Professor PAUL H. ROBINSON, Sackler Scholar 2000/2001. Colin S. Diver Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School, Philadelphia, PA, 2003 - date. Edna & Ednyfed Williams Professor of Law 1998-2002, Northwestern University of School of Law; Rutgers University School of Law at Camden, Distinguished Professor. Co-Editor, Criminal Law and Procedure Abstracts, 1996 - date. Member, American Law Institute, 1990-94. First recipient, "Outstanding Faculty Member" of Rutgers University, 1989. Commissioner, United States Sentencing Commission, 1985-88, nominated by the President of U.S.A. (b. 1948)
Bernard Roizman
Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology, Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA, bernard.roizman@bsd.uchicago.edu
Professor BERNARD ROIZMAN, Sc.D., Sackler Scholar 1994/1995. Joseph Regenstein Distinguished Service Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, M. B. Kovler Laboratories, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Member of National Academy of Sciences 1979; Fellow of American Academy of Arts and Sciences 1991 and American Association for the Advancement of Science 2004. Recipient: J. Allyn Taylor International Prize in Medicine, 1997; Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Infectious Disease Research, 1998. NIH Outstanding Investigator Award 1988-2001; NIH-Natioanl Cancer Institute Merit Award, 2003 and Abbott-ASM Lifetime Achievement Award 2008. (b. 1930)
Thomas Römer

Professor of Chair of "Milieux Bibliques", College de France, Paris, France and Faculty of Theology and Sciences of Religions, University of Lausanne, Switzerland, thomas.romer@college-de-france.fr


Professor THOMAS CHRISTIAN RÖMER, Sackler Lecturer 2010-2011. Faculty of Theology and Sciences of Religions in the University of Lausanne since 1993, and Professor at the College de France (chaire des milieux bibliques) since 2007. He has served as Vice-Dean and Dean, Faculty of Theology and Sciences of Religions at different periods over the last 14 years. Also invited Professor in the Faculties of Theology in Montpellier, Neuchatel, Paris, Zurich, Mexico, and Managua since 1993. Current research: the Formation of the Torah (especially the books of Genesis and Numbers), the question of the So-called deuteronomistic History and its Social and Historical Setting; Moses Traditions Inside and outside the Bible. Member of Editorial Committees: Etudes theologiques et religieuses (Montpellier), Transeuphratene (Paris), Review of Biblical Literature (Atlanta, until 2006), Revue de Theologie et de Philosophie (Lausanne, from 1993 to 1999), Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception, de Gruyter, Berlin-New York, Ancient Israel and Its Literature. (SBLAIL, Atlanta); and Director of the collections ''Le Monde de la Bible'', ''Essais bibliques'' (Labor et Fides, Geneva). Fellowship in Societies and Steering Committees: Swiss Society for the Study of the Ancient Near-East (SSPOA-SGOA), ''Deuteronomistic History Section'' for the Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta, ''Pentateuch Section''. Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta; Society for the Study of the Old Testament (UK); Swiss Society of Theology; Swiss Society for the Sciences of Religions; Fachgruppe Altes Testament (Deutschland). In 2015, Prof. Römer received an Honorary Doctorate from Tel Aviv University. (b. 1955)

Vladimir Rokhlim
Computer Science Department and Department of Mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, rokhlin@cs.yale.edu
Professor VLADIMIR ROKHLIN, Sackler Lecturer 2010/2011, is Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. He joined the Yale Faculty in 1985. Prof. Vladimir Rokhlin's research interests include randomized algorithms of numerical analysis, partial differential equations, scattering theory, numerical solution of integral equations, quadrature formulae for singular functions, approximation theory, harmonic analysis. He received his M.S. from Vilnius University, Lithuania in 1973 and his Ph.D. from Rice University, Houston, Texas in 1985. He is a member of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering. He is a recipient of the 2001 Leroy P. Steele Prize for a Seminal Contribution to Research, and the 2001 Rice University Distinguished Alumnus Award. He is co-inventor of the fast multipole method (FMM) in 1987, and recognized as one of the top-ten algorithms of the 20th century. (b. 1952)
Aviel D. Rubin

Computer Science and Technical Director, Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute; and Director and Principal Investigator (PI), National Science Foundation's ACCURATE Center avirubin@gmail.com


Dr. AVIEL D. RUBIN, Sackler Lecturer 2010-2011. Professor of Computer Science and Technical Director of the Information Security Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, Rubin was a research scientist at AT&T Labs. He is also a co-founder of Independent Security Evaluators (securityevaluators.com), a security consulting firm. Rubin has testified before the U.S. House and Senate on multiple occasions, and he is author of several books including Brave New Ballot (Random House, 2006) Firewalls and Internet Security, second edition (with Bill Cheswick and Steve Bellovin, Addison Wesley, 2003), White-Hat Security Arsenal (Addison Wesley, 2001), and Web Security Sourcebook (with Dan Geer and Marcus Ranum, John Wiley & Sons, 1997). He is Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, Associate Editor of Communications of the ACM (CACM), and an Advisory Board member of Springer's Information Security and Cryptography Book Series. Dr. Rubin will spend his Sabbatical in 2010-2011 on a Fulbright Fellowship at Tel Aviv University studying security issues in electronic medical records. In January, 2004 Baltimore Magazine named Rubin a Baltimorean of the Year for his work in safeguarding the integrity of our election process, and he is also the recipient of the 2004 Electronic Frontiers Foundation Pioneer Award. Rubin has a B.S, ('89), M.S.E ('91), and Ph.D. ('94) from the University of Michigan.

Yoram Rubin
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California, rubin@ce.berkeley.edu
Prof. YORAM RUBIN, Sackler Lecturer, 2011/2012. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. His previous appointments include: Founding Director, Berkeley Water Center, 2004-2007. Director, Berkeley's Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, 2003-2008 and Head, Environmental Engineering Group, U.C. Berkeley, 2001-2003 He teaches classes in subsurface hydrology. His research interests include modeling of flow and transport in geological media and subsurface characterization. He currently leads research projects for the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy. Prof. Rubin received his Ph.D., Tel-Aviv University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, 1988. M.Sc., Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering, 1984 and B.Sc., Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Civil Engineering, 1977. Prof. Rubin is Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media since 2000. He is a Fellow, American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2006 and Recipient of the Hydrologic Science Award, AGU, 2004. He is a board member, Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment journal since 1999. Lifetime member, International Water Academy, Oslo, Norway, 2005. President, International Commission on Ground Water, International Association of Hydrologic Science (IAHS), 2001-2005.
David Ruderman
Department of Modern Jewish History and Director, Center for Advanced Judaic Studies University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, , Scholar 2006/2007 Ruderman@sas.upenn.edu
Professor DAVID RUDERMAN, Sackler Scholar 2005/2006, 2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009. David B. Ruderman is the Joseph Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History and Ella Darivoff Director of the Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to coming to Pennsylvania, he taught at the University of Maryland [1974-83] and at Yale University [1983-94]. He is the author of many books and articles including The World of a Renaissance Jew, 1981 [Winner of a JWB national Jewish book award in 1982]; Kabbalah, Magic, and Science, 1988; A Valley of Vision, 1990; Jewish Thought and Scientific Discovery in Early Modern Europe, 1995, 2001, published also in Italian and Hebrew; and Jewish Enlightenment in an English Key: Anglo-Jewry's Construction of Modern Jewish Thought, 2000, which won the Koret Award for the best book in Jewish History in 2001. His forthcoming book: Connecting the Covenants: Judaism and the Search for Christian Identity in Eighteenth Century England will appear in 2007. He has also edited or co-edited four other books and co-edited two popular textbooks. He is the immediate past president of the American Academy for Jewish Research. The Teaching Company has produced two of his Jewish history courses, each in 24 lectures. In 2001, the National Foundation for Jewish Culture honored him with its lifetime achievement award for his work in Jewish history.
Madan Rao

Sackler Scholar 2018/2019, is a Senior Professor at the Simons Centre for the Study of Living Machines, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) - Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Bangalore, India, madan@ncbs.res.in


Prof. Madan Rao, Sackler Scholar 2018/2019, is a Senior Professor at the Simons Centre for the Study of Living Machines, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) - Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Bangalore, India (2016-). He graduated in Physics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, in 1982, and received his Ph.D. degree in Condensed Matter Physics from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, in 1989. After a three-year postdoctoral stay at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver (1989-1992), he returned to India for his first faculty position at the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (1992-1993).

 

During the years 1994-1998, Prof. Rao held a faculty position at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Madras, after which he moved to Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, where he stayed as an Associate and then Full Professor until 2016. In parallel, he had Adjunct Professorships at NCBS (1999-2016) and International Centre for Theoretical Studies, Bangalore (2008-present). Over his scientific career, Prof. Rao has stayed as a Visiting Professor in several world scientific centers in USA (Kansas University), Canada (University of Toronto), and Europe (International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy, and others).

 

Prof. Rao is one of the founders of the new and fast developing field, Physics of Active Matter, which addresses a broad class of essentially non-equilibrium processes driven by persistent energy input and dissipation. The plethora of phenomena encompassed by this field ranges from hydrodynamic behavior of suspensions and porous media to dynamic processes in membranes and the internal medium of biological cells. The most significant and commonly recognized achievement reached by Prof. Rao over the last decade is a theory of the structural behavior of protein assemblies on the surfaces of biological membranes coupled to the active polymeric systems (cytoskeleton) existing with live cells.

 

Besides other honors, Prof. Rao was elected as Fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences (2011) and Fellow of the Indian National Science Academy (2016). He has published over 110 papers; most of which appeared in the highest impact factor journals such as Cell, PNAS, and Phys. Rev. Letters.

 

Madan Rao

Sackler Scholar 2018/2019, is a Senior Professor at the Simons Centre for the Study of Living Machines, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) - Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Bangalore, India, madan@ncbs.res.in


Prof. Madan Rao, Sackler Scholar 2018/2019, is a Senior Professor at the Simons Centre for the Study of Living Machines, National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) - Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Bangalore, India (2016-). He graduated in Physics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, in 1982, and received his Ph.D. degree in Condensed Matter Physics from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, in 1989. After a three-year postdoctoral stay at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver (1989-1992), he returned to India for his first faculty position at the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (1992-1993).

 

During the years 1994-1998, Prof. Rao held a faculty position at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Madras, after which he moved to Raman Research Institute, Bangalore, where he stayed as an Associate and then Full Professor until 2016. In parallel, he had Adjunct Professorships at NCBS (1999-2016) and International Centre for Theoretical Studies, Bangalore (2008-present). Over his scientific career, Prof. Rao has stayed as a Visiting Professor in several world scientific centers in USA (Kansas University), Canada (University of Toronto), and Europe (International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy, and others).

 

Prof. Rao is one of the founders of the new and fast developing field, Physics of Active Matter, which addresses a broad class of essentially non-equilibrium processes driven by persistent energy input and dissipation. The plethora of phenomena encompassed by this field ranges from hydrodynamic behavior of suspensions and porous media to dynamic processes in membranes and the internal medium of biological cells. The most significant and commonly recognized achievement reached by Prof. Rao over the last decade is a theory of the structural behavior of protein assemblies on the surfaces of biological membranes coupled to the active polymeric systems (cytoskeleton) existing with live cells.

 

Besides other honors, Prof. Rao was elected as Fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences (2011) and Fellow of the Indian National Science Academy (2016). He has published over 110 papers; most of which appeared in the highest impact factor journals such as Cell, PNAS, and Phys. Rev. Letters.

 

S
Victor Shrira
Dept. of Mathematics, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, UK. v.i.shrira@keele.ac.uk
Prof. VICTOR SHRIRA, Sackler Scholar 2015/16 and 2016/17, Professor of Applied Mathematics at the School of Computing and Mathematics at Keele University, UK.
Seymour Spilerman
Department of Sociology, Columbia University, USA, Ss50@columbia.edu
Professor SEYMOUR SPILERMAN, Sackler Scholar 1988/1989. Julian C. Levi Professor of Social Sciences and Director of the Center for the Study of Wealth and Inequality. Department of Sociology, Columbia University, New York. Recipient of Romnes Award 1975; Lady Davis Fellow, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 1996; Fulbright Fellowship, Haifa University (declined) 2004; and Schonbrunn Fellowship at Hebrew University (accepted) 2004. (b. 1938)
Shlomo Sternberg
Dept. of Mathematics, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA, shlomo@math.harvard.edu
Professor SHLOMO STERNBERG, Past Sackler Institute Member, Academic Years 1981/82 - 1995/96. Department of Mathematics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. (b. 1936)
Prof. David N. Seidman, Ph.D.
Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. d-seidman@northwestern.edu
Prof. DAVID N. SEIDMAN, Ph.D., Sackler Lecturer 2011-2012. Walter P. Murphy Prof. of Materials Science and Engineering at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, and founding director of the Northwestern University Center for Atom-Probe Tomography (NUCAPT). David Seidman's research centers on understanding the relationships between microstructure, at all length scales, and their physical and mechanical properties at ambient and elevated temperatures of a wide range of materials. This implies understanding the atomistic mechanisms for phase separation in, for example, concentrated multicomponent alloys, which implies performing atomic scale experiments and simulations in parallel. Additionally, he is currently interested in solid-state reactions between metals and silicon and the resulting electronic properties. His research involves the use of atom-probe tomography, high-resolution electron-microscopy, analytical electron-microscopy, synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Prof. Seidman received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from New York University and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign under the direction of Robert W. Balluffi. Prior to taking up his present position at Northwestern University in 1985 he was a Prof. of materials science and engineering at Cornell University. Seidman is a pioneer in applying field-ion microscopy, atom-probe field-ion microscopy, and atom-probe tomography to a wide range of basic physical and engineering problems in different materials. He was the Materials Research Society's David Turnbull Lecturer in 2008, and is a fellow the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Physical Society, ASM International, Materials Research Society, and TMS (Minerals-Metals-Materials), and was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, 1972-73 and 1980-81. He is the TMS Institute of Metals Lecturer and the Robert Franklin Mehl Awardee for 2011. He is recipient of the Alexander Von Humboldt Stiftung Prize, 1988 and 1992, a Max Planck Research Prize of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft and the Alexander Von Humboldt Stiftung in 1993, awarded jointly with the late Prof. Dr. Peter Haasen. He is the author of over 370 publications.
Balasubramaniam Shanker
Department of Electrical and Computer, Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, bshanker@egr.msu.edu
Prof. BALASUBRAMANIAM SHANKER, Sackler Lecturer 2011/ 2012, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan since 2002. His research interest include all aspects of computational electromagnetics (frequency and time domain integral equation based methods, multi-scale fast multipole methods, fast transient methods, higher order finite element and integral equation methods), propagation in complex media, mesoscale electromagnetics, and particle and molecular dynamics as applied to multiphysics and multiscale problems.   Prof. Shanker received his B'Tech from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, India in 1989, and his M.S. and Ph.D from Pennsylvania State University, respectively in 1992 and 1993. He was a Research Associate, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Iowa State University where he worked on the Molecular Theory of Optical Activity from 1993 to 1996. He was with the Center for Computational Electromagnetics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a Visiting Assistant Prof. from 1996 to 1999 and Assistant Prof. , Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University from 1999-2002.   Prof. Shanker has authored/co-authored over 300 journal and conferences papers and presented a number of invited talks. He was an Associate Editor for IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters (AWPL), is an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, and is a full member of the USNC-URSI Commission B. He is Fellow of IEEE, elected for his contributions in computational electromagnetics. He has also been awarded the Withrow Distinguished Junior Scholar in 2003, Withrow Distinguished Senior Scholar in 2010 and the Withrow Teaching Award in 2007. (b. 1967)
Peter Schäfer
Professor of Jewish Studies and Director, Institut für Judaistik, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, pschafer@Princeton.edu
Professor PETER SCHÄFER, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. University Professor of Jewish Studies and Director, Institut für Judaistik, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany since 1983 and Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Judaic Studies and Professor of Religion, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey since 1998. Foreign Member, American Philosophical Society since 1997; International Advisory Committee, Center for Judaic Studies, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia since 1995; Advisory Committee, Shaul Lieberman Institute for Talmudic Research, Jewish Theological Seminary of America, New York since 1994; Corresponding Fellow, American Academy for Jewish Research since 1994; Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy since 1987; and Fellow, Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences since 1994; and recipient of the Leibniz Prize 1994. Honorary Doctorate, Tel Aviv University 2007. (b. 1943)
Gerald Schubert
Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles , USA
Professor GERALD SCHUBERT, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Distinguished Professor, Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles since 2002. Member, Academia Europaea (2009) Member, National Academy of Sciences (2002) Chair, Geophysics Section (Section 16), National Academy of Sciences (2008-) Harry Hess Medal, American Geophysical Union (2002) Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2001) James B. MacElwane Award of the American Geophysical Union (1975). Professor Schubert was Editor-in-Chief of the 11-volume Treatise on Geophysics, published by Elsevier in 2007. He is a coauthor of approximately 500 papers and three books Geodynamics, D.L. Turcotte and G. Schubert, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 1982 Mantle Convection in the Earth and Planets, G. Schubert, D.L. Turcotte, and P. Olson, Cambridge University Press, 2001 and Geodynamics, 2nd ed., D.L. Turcotte and G. Schubert, Cambridge University Press, 2002. Professor Schubert?s main interests are the physics of the Earth and Moon, the other planets and satellites of the solar system, and extra-solar planets. He studies both the interiors and atmospheres of these bodies. He has been a major participant in the planning and execution of numerous space missions, including the Apollo lunar program, the Pioneer Venus and Magellan missions to Venus and the Galileo mission to the Jovian system.
Marc Shell
Department of English and American Language and Literature, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, mshell@fas.harvard.edu
Professor MARC SHELL, Sackler Scholar,2006/ 2007/2008. Irving Babbit Professor of Comparative Literature and Professor of English and American Language and Literature, Harvard University, Cambridge. Chair, Literature Department, Harvard; and Co-Director and Founder (with Prof. João Carlos Espada, University of Lisbon), Program in Literature and Politics in Cascais, Portugal since 2003; Co-Director (with Prof. Gregory Nagy) and Founder, The Harvard Study Program in Olympia, Greece (new summer program in Comparative Cultural Studies) since 2001; Member Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital General Committee since 2000; Chair, Harvard's Interfaculty Initiative for Disabilities Studies; Co-Director and Founder (with Prof. Werner Sollers), The Longfellow Institute, Harvard since 1995; and Co-Director and Founder (with Dr. Jean-Marie Thiveaud), Programme Finance, Ethique, Confiance, a division of Association d'économie financière (Paris) from 1993-98. Recipient: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Prize Fellow. Prof. Shell works in a wide variety of languages and literatures including: English, French, German, Latin, Hebrew (Biblical), Greek (Classical), Spanish and Portuguese. (b. 1947)
Joseph I. Silk
Savilian Professor of Astronomy, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, j.silk1@physics.ox.ac.uk
Professor JOSEPH I. SILK, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. 2004/2005. Savilian Professor of Astron- omy and Director, Beecraft Institute for Particle, Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. Member of the American Physical Society 1996; International Astronomical Union; American Astronomical Society; Fellow, Royal Astronomical Society 1999; Fellow, Royal Society 1999; Honoray Member of the French Physical Society 1997. American Physical Society; and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Sackler Fellow, Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, United Kingdom 1997. Research interests: Theoretical cosmology, dark matter, galaxy formation, and cosmic microwave background. In his honor, the structure of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies (principally determined by two effects: acoustic oscillations and diffusion damping) is called the Silk damping or collisionless damping. (b. 1943)
Norman Silverman
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California, USA, norm.silverman@Stanford.edu
Professor NORMAN SILVERMAN, MD, D Sc (Med), FACC, Sackler Scholar 2001/2002 and 2004/2005. Professor, Pediatrics; Director, Pediatric and Fetal Echocardiography Laboratories, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California; 1974-present. Recipient, Roma and Marvin Auerback Scholar in Pediatric Cardiolgy, 2005. Member, American Academy of Pediatrics, 1974; American Pediatric Society, 1992; California Academy of Medicine, 1998. Fellow, American College of Cardiology, 1974; American Heart Association and American Society of Echocardiography; and Graduate Fellow of the South African College of Physicians with Pediatrics FCPSA (Paeds). (b. 1942)
Mark A. Sperling
Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Division of Endocrinology, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, masp@pitt.edu
Professor MARK A. SPERLING, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh since July 2001, and Vira I. Heinze Professsor, Chair, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatrician-in-Chief, 1989 - June 2001. Member, Association of American Physicians, 1996; American Society for Clinical Investigation, 1982, American Pediatric Society, The Endocrine Society, American Academy of Pediatrics, and others. Recipient: President-elect/President, Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, 2001-04; Mary Jane Kugel Award, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, 2003 and 1977; Research Advisory Board, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation since 2000; McElroy Award-University of Pittsburgh - "outstanding Alumnus of a Residency/Fellowship Training Program" 1996. Chairman, Ad-Hoc Review Committee, National Institutes of Health, 1994; NIH, National Diabetes Advisory Board, 1990-94; American Diabetes Association; Editor-in-Chief, Pediatric Diabetes (Official Journal of ISPAD- the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes), Editor of Textbook: PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY, Editor-in-Chief, The Physician's Guide to Type I Diabetes (IDDM): Diagnosis and Treatment, 1986-87. (b. 1938)
Sarah Spiegel
Mann T. and Sara D. Lowry Chair Oncology; Chair, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA, spiegel@vcu.edu
Prof. SARAH SPIEGEL, Sackler Lecturer 2014/2015, is Professor and Chair, Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA since 2002 and Director, Cancer Cell Biology Program, Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, VA since 2005. Previously she was in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Georgetown University Medical School, Washington, DC from 1987-2001. She received her B.Sc., Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1974, Ph.D., Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot in 1983, and a Postdoc, NINCDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD from 1984-1986. Prof. Spiegel was involved in the study of sphingolipid metabolites as signaling molecules from its origin. Our research is focused on the enigmatic lipid mediator, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), whose role as a signaling lipid was discovered in my lab two decades ago. Our lab has discovered that many important physiological and pathophysiological processes are regulated by S1P. Prof. Spiegel is on the Editorial Boards ofJ. Biol. Chem., Glycoconjugate Journal, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, Signal Transduction - Receptors, Mediators and Genes, Journal Lipid Research, Biological Chemistry since 2000 and FASEB Journal since 2005. She is a Member Society for Complex Carbohydrates, ASCB, ASBMB since 1987. Her honors include: NIH MERIT Award from NIGMS in 2003, University Distinguished Scholarship Award and The Women in Science, Dentistry, and Medicine (WISDM) Professional Achievement Award in 2007 AAAS Fellow, Medical Sciences Section and the ASBMB Avanti LIpids Award, New Orleans, LA in 2009, Mann T. and Sara D. Lowry Chair in Cancer Research in 2011 and the Charles C. Sweeley Endowed Lectureship in Biochemistry, Michigan State University in 2012.
Sabine Schmidtke
Institute of Islamic Studies, Freie Universitát Berlin,Germany, sabineschmidtke@gmail.com
Professor SABINE SCHMIDTKE, Sackler Scholar 2010/2011. School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey from July 2014 and former Member in the School (2008-09, 2013-14). Additional positions: Institute of Islamic Studies at Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany, where she directs the Research Unit Intellectual History of the Islamicate World since 2011. Since 2013, Schmidtke has served as founding Academic Director of the trilateral M.A. program Intellectual Encounters of the Islamicate World, which is a cooperative initiative of the Freie Universität Berlin, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Al-Quds University (Palestine). She is sectional editor (theology & philosophy) of The Encyclopaedia of Islam, 3rd ed. and co-founder and -coordinator of the M'tazilite Manuscripts Group (established 2003). She has published extensively on Islamic and Jewish intellectual history. Her works include Theologie, Philosophie und Mystik im zwolferschiitischen Islam des 9./15. Jahrhunderts. Die Gedankenwelt des Ibn Abi Jumhur al-A+sa-i (um 838/1434-35 - nach 906/1501) (Leiden 2000) and, together with Reza Pourjavady, A Jewish Philosopher of Baghdad. 'Izz al-Dawla Ibn Kammuna and his Writings (Leiden 2006) and Critical Remarks by Najm al-Din al-Katibi on the Kitab al-Ma6alim by Fakhr al-Din al-Razi, together with the Commentaries by 'Izz al-Dawla Ibn Kammuna (Tehran 2007). She has co-edited, with Camilla Adang and David Sklare, A Common Rationality. Mu' tazilism in Islam and Judaism (Wurzburg 2007). Schmidtke has won several international prizes and fellowships and is currently holding a European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Research Grant.
Fotis Sotiropoulos
James L. Record professor of Civil Engineering and the director of the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota () since January 2006, USA, fotis@umn.edu
Prof. FOTIS SOTIROPOULOS, Sackler Lecturer 2013/2014. He received his diploma in Mechanical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens in 1986, a MS in Aerospace Engineering from The Penn State University in 1989, and a PhD in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 1991. In 1991 he joined the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research at the University of Iowa as a post-doctoral researcher. In 1995 he joined the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology (School of Civil and Environmental Engineering) where he became Professor in 2005. Since 2002, he held a joint faculty appointment with the G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.   Sotiropoulos' research centers on advancing simulation-based engineering science as a powerful paradigm for tackling frontier scientific problems that reside at the intersection of fluid mechanics with renewable energy, environmental restoration, aquatic biology, and cardiovascular bioengineering. He has made major contributions in developing novel, fluid-structure interaction computational algorithms and in applying these algorithms to tackle societal challenges of our time in energy, environment and health. Current research interests include: optimizing land-based and offshore wind turbines and farms; assessing and mitigating the environmental impacts of marine and hydrokinetic turbine arrays developing ecologically-friendly hydro-turbine designs developing science-based strategies for restoring rivers and streams exploring the links between hydrodynamics and the evolution of fish and other aquatic organisms and developing patient-specific computational tools for optimizing medical devices and virtual surgery. His research is funded by the US National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, and the private industry. Sotiropoulos is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), he has won twice the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Gallery of Fluid Motion (2009, 2011), and is a recipient of a Career award from the National Science Foundation. He is also serving on the editorial boards of the ASCE Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, the International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, and Computers and Fluids.
David Spergel
Chair, Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA, dns@astro.princeton.edu
Professor , Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Chair, Department of Astrophysical Sciences and the Charles A. Young Professor of Astronomy on the Class of 1897 Foundation, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey. He holds other positions: Associate Faculty, Department of Physics and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University; Fellow, Princeton Center for Theoretical Physics. Prof. Spergel is a Principal Investigator at the new Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo. Recipient of the following prizes: Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow, 1988-92 NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, 1988-93 Helen B. Warner Prize, 1994 Bart Bok Prize, 1994 AAS Second Century Lecturer, 2000 Time Magazine: ''One of America's Top Scientists'', 2001 MacArthur Fellowship, 2001, National Academy of Sciences, 2007 and ISI Highly Cited Scientist, 2007. Memberships include: American Astronomical Society, American Physical Society, International Astronomical Society and past President, IAU Commision #33 (The Galaxy), 2001-2003. Spergel has served as chair of NASA's Astrophysics Subcommittee and of the KITP Advisory Board. He is Editor, Princeton Series in Astrophysics, Princeton University Press. Prof. Spergel has published over 170 scientific articles in refereed journals. Main focus of research: Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Satellite is a NASA MIDEX Explorer mission, which has produced a wealth of precise and accurate cosmological information, member of scientific working group the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and supporting observations through the Southern Cosmology Surveys. Prof. Spergel is part of group developing new technologies that should hopefully enable the direct imaging of earth-like planets - Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) will be the next great space telescope in NASAs program to explore the origins of life in the universe. (b. 1961)
Prof. Timothy M. Swager
Professor of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, tswager@mit.edu
Prof. TIMOTHY M. SWAGER, Sackler Lecturer 2012/2013, is the John D. MacArthur Prof. of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. A native of Montana, he received a BS from Montana State University in 1983 and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1988. After a postdoctoral appointment at MIT he was on the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and moved back to MIT in July of 1996 as a Prof. of Chemistry and served as the Head of Chemistry at MIT from 2005-2010. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed papers and serves on multiple editorial, governmental and corporate scientific advisory boards. Swager's honors include: the John Scott Award 2008, Election to the National Academy of Sciences 2008, Honorary Doctorate from Montana State University 2008, the Lemelson-MIT Award for Invention and Innovation 2007, Election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 2006, the Christopher Columbus Foundation Homeland Security Award 2005, and The Carl S. Marvel Creative Polymer Chemistry Award (ACS) 2005.   Swager's research interests are in design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, high-strength and liquid crystalline materials. In the field of liquid crystals he developed new designs based upon shape complementarity to generate specific interactions between molecules and has recently developed fundamental mechanisms for increasing the order in liquid crystals by a new mechanism referred to as minimization of free volume. These organization concepts have also led his group to the creation of interlocked polymer structures with enhanced strength. Swager's research in electronic polymers has been directed at the demonstration of new conceptual approaches to the construction of sensory materials. These methods are the basis of the FidoTM explosives detectors (FLIR Systems Inc), which have the highest sensitivity of any explosives sensor. In particular, he has developed general sensory transduction schemes for both conducting polymers and carbon nanotube systems that translate molecular recognition events into readily measured signals. Other areas actively investigated by the Swager group include monomeric and polymers radicals for dynamic nuclear polarization, MRI imaging methods, ultra-stable low dielectric constant polymers for use as interlayer dielectrics in electronics, organic photovoltaic materials, polymer actuators, and luminescent molecular probes for medical diagnostics. (b. 1961)
Chi-Wang Shu

Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, shu@dam.brown.edu


Prof. Chi-Wang Shu, Sackler Lecturer 2016/2017 & Sackler Fellow 2017/2018 obtained his B.S. degree from the University of Science and Technology of China in 1982 and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1986. He came to Brown University as an Assistant Professor in 1987, moving up to Associate Professor in 1992 and Full Professor in 1996.  He was the Chair of the Division of Applied Mathematics between 1999 and 2005, and is now the Theodore B. Stowell University Professor of Applied Mathematics.

His research interest includes high order finite difference, finite element and spectral methods for solving hyperbolic and other convection dominated partial differential equations, with applications to areas such as computational fluid dynamics, semi-conductor device simulations and computational cosmology.

He served as the Managing Editor of Mathematics of Computation between 2002 and 2012, is now the Chief Editor of Journal of Scientific Computing and serves in the editorial boards of several other journals.  His honors include the First Feng Kang Prize of Scientific Computing in 1995 and the SIAM/ACM Prize in Computational Science and Engineering in 2007.  He is a SIAM Fellow and an AMS Fellow, and an invited speaker at the International Congress of Mathematicians at Seoul in 2014.

Miranda Schreurs

Chair, Environment and Climate Policy Department, Bavarian School of Public Policy, Technical University of Munich, miranda.schreurs@hfp.tum.de


Prof. Miranda A. Schreurs (PhD, University of Michigan), Sackler Scholar 2016/2017, is Professor of Environment and Climate Policy at the Bavarian School of Public Policy at the Technical University of Munich. Her research focuses on climate change, low carbon energy transitions and environmental movements in Europe, the United States and Asia.

 

Prof. Schreurs has researched and taught at various Japanese universities and for a period of three years conducted research at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University supported by a grant awarded by the MacArthur Foundation. She was a tenured associate professor in the Department of Government and Politics, University of Maryland, College Park before becoming Director of the Environmental Policy Research Center and Professor of Comparative Politics at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2007. From 2008 until 2016 she served as member of the German Advisory Council on the Environment.

 

In 2011, Prof. Schreurs was appointed by Chancellor Angela Merkel as a member of the German Ethics Commission on a Safe Energy Supply. She is currently Vice Chair of the European Environment and Sustainable Development Advisory Councils, a network of advisory councils across Europe; International Board Director of the Institute of Global Environmental Strategies; and on the Advisory Board of the Swiss National Foundation’s NSF Research Program 71 on the Swiss Energy Transition. She has served on numerous governmental advisory bodies in China, Germany, and Europe.

Erich Sackmann

Department of Physics, Technical University of Munich, Germany, sackmann@ph.tum.de


Prof. Erich Sackmann, Sackler Lecturer 2017/2018, is a Professor Emeritus at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU). He received his Ph.D in Physics (1964) under the supervision of Professor Theodor Förster, the Technical University of Stuttgart. After two years as member of the Technical Staff at Bell Labs, Murray Hill, New Jersey, he joined as a researcher the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen.



In 1974, Prof. Sackmann was appointed as Full Professor of Physics and Head of the Biophysics Department at the University of Ulm. He was President of the German Biophysical Society (1974-1980), and between 1980-2003, he held the Chair of Biological Physics at the Physics Department, TUM.


Prof. Sackmann was a founding member and chairperson of the Biological Physics Section in the German Physical Society, and served as Dean of the Faculty of Physics of the TUM (1989-1991). He also served as chairperson of the DFG Interdisciplinary Research Project on Biological and Artificial Interfaces on Solids (1988-2000).

Prof. Sackmann served in numerous national and international committees including RIKEN Institute, Japan; Curie Institute, Paris; Max Planck Society and Institutes, Minerva Centers, Heräus Foundation, and Helmholtz Excellence Program. He served as founding Editor of European Biophysics Letters, editor of Biological Physics Section of Progress in Physics and was an advisory board member of ChemPhysChem. He is presently on the Editorial Board of Acta Materialia Biophisica and Physical Review.


Among Prof. Sackmann's awards are: the 7th DATTA lecturer (1994), Oswald Award, German Colloid Society (2001), Fellow of the American Physical Society (2002), Regents professorship of University of California (UCLA) (2004), and Stern-Gerlach Medal of the German Physics Society (2006).

 

Wolfgang Schleich

Chair Professor of Theoretical Physics, Universitat Ulm, Germany. wolfgang.schleich@uni-ulm.de


Prof. Wolfgang P. Schleich, Sackler Lecturer 2018/2019, was born in Mühldorf, Germany, in 1957. He became a professor of theoretical physics and head of the Institute of Quantum Physics at Ulm University in 1991 and is engaged in research on quantum optics ranging from the foundations of quantum physics via tests of general relativity with light and cold atoms to number theory.

 

The Ludwig Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Munich was central to the education of Prof. Schleich. Here he received his Diploma, PhD and Habilitation in 1981, 1984, and 1989, respectively. During this time he worked with Marlan O. Scully at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, and with Herbert Walther at the Max-Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ), Garching. From 1984 to 1986 he was a post-doctoral fellow with John Archibald Wheeler at the University of Texas at Austin and from 1989 to 1990 he was Privatdozent at LMU and MPQ.

 

For his scientific achievements, Prof. Schleich has been elected to several national and international academies and has received numerous prizes and honors such as the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize, the Max Planck Research Award, and the Willis E. Lamb Award for Laser Science and Quantum Optics. He is also a Faculty Fellow at the Hagler Institute for Advanced Study at Texas A&M University.

 

Prof. Schleich is the author of more than 360 publications. His textbook, Quantum Optics in Phase Space, has been translated into Russian and a Chinese edition was published in 2010.

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Christopher Tomlins
Chancellor's Professor of Law, School of Law, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA ctomlins@law.uci.edu
Prof. CHRISTOPHER L. TOMLINS, Sackler Scholar 2015/2016, Professor of Law, University of California Berkeley, and Affiliated Research Professor, American Bar Foundation, Chicago.
Alfred I. Tauber, Zoltan Kohn
Professor of Medicine, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA, ait@bu.edu
Professor ALFRED I. TAUBER, Past Sackler Institute Member, Academic Years from 2004/05 - 2006/07. Director, Center for Philosophy and History of Science, Boston University since 1993 and Zoltan Kohn Professor of Medicine since 2004 & Professor of Pathology since 1987, Boston University School of Medicine. Associate Staff in Medicine, University Hospital, Boston, MA. Memberships & Awards: American Society of Hematology 1978; Fellow, American College of Physicians 1981; Association of American Physicians since 1989 and International Society for the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Biology 1990; Board of Fellows, Brandeis University 1978; Trustee, Tufts University, 2003-2008; Gold Humanism Honor Society, Boston University School of Medicine Chapter, 2006. Since 2004, he has held a part-time visiting professorship at Tel Aviv University, where he teaches in the Cohn Institute for the History of Science and Ideas and supervises research in the medical school. (b. 1947)
Marta Tienda
The Maurice P. During '22 Professor in Demographic Studies, Professor of Sociology. Dept. of Soc. & Population Research Center, NORC; Univ. of Chicago, USA, tienda@princeton.edu
Sackler Scholar 1993/1994. The Maurice P. During '22 Professor in Demographic Studies, Professor of Sociology and Professor in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA from 1997 - present. She served as Director of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University from 1997-2002. Prof. Tienda was previously the Associate Director, Population Research Center, NORC and Professor, Department of Sociology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 1987- 1997. Prof. Tienda is co-author of The Color of Opportunity: Pathways to Family, Work, and Welfare in the Inner City (University of Chicago, 2001) and co-editor of Youth in Cities: A Cross-National Perspective (Cambridge, 2002). She served as President of the Population Association of America in 2002. In 2003 she was named as one of the Top 100 Influential Hispanics by Hispanic Business Magazine. In 2004, the American Academy of Political and Social Science elected her as the Ernest W. Burgess Fellow. (b. 1950)
Bruce J. Tromberg
Director, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic; Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery, University of California, Irvine Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Biomedical Optics bjtrombe@uci.edu
Dr. BRUCE J. TROMBERG, Sackler Lecturer 2011/2012, is the Director of the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (BLI) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and principal investigator of the Laser Microbeam and Medical Program (LAMMP), an NIH National Biomedical Technology Center in the BLI. He is a Prof. with joint appointments in the departments of Biomedical Engineering and Surgery and has been a member of the UCI faculty since 1990. Dr. Tromberg co-leads the Onco-imaging and Spectroscopy Program in UCI's NIH-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Translational Technology program in UCI's NIH-designated Institute for Clinical and Translational Science. He research spans the interdisciplinary fields of Biophotonics and Biomedical Optics with particular emphasis on the development of new technologies for medical imaging and therapy. Major areas of activity include Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging, Non-linear optical microscopy, and Photodynamic Therapy. Dr. Tromberg has trained more than 50 Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows in Biophotonicsand Biomedical Optics. His work includes more than 300 publications and 13 patents in Biophotonics technologies and their application to problems in cancer, vascular disease, neuroscience, and critical care. Dr. Tromberg received his undergraduate training in Chemistry from Vanderbilt University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemistry from the University of Tennessee where he was a U.S. Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Associated Universities Fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dr. Tromberg was a Hewitt Foundation Photo medicine Fellow at the Beckman Laser Institute. He serves on several National advisory committees including the Experimental Imaging Sciences Committee for the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN), the board of directors for the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE), and is the former editor-in-chief for the Journal of Biomedical Optics. Dr. Tromberg has received several awards for his work including the R&D 100 award, OE Magazine Technology Innovator Award, and is a Fellow of the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE) and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE). (b. 1957)
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Abraham Udovitch
Islamic History, Near Eastern Studies Dept., Princeton University, USA, alud@princeton.edu
Professor ABRAHAM L. UDOVITCH, Sackler Scholar 1999/2000. Khedouri A. Zilkha Professor of Jewish Civilization in the Near East , Near Eastern Studies Department, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey. Professor, College de France, Paris and Ecole des Hautes Etudes on Science Sociales, Paris. Member, Board of Governors of the American Research Institute in Turkey since 1969, Board of Editors of the Journal of Inter-Disciplinary History and of The International Journal of Middle East Studies; co-editor Studia Islamica; World Executive Committee of the International Center for Peace in the Middle East. (b. 1937)
Wouter Cornelis Ultee
Professor of General and Theoretical Sociology, Catholic University Nijmegen, The Netherlands, W.Ultee@maw.ru.nl
Professor WOUTER CORNELIS ULTEE, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. Professor of General and Theoretical Sociology, Catholic University Nijmegen, The Netherlands since 1987. Member of the Board of Scientific Directors of the Graduate School "Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology (ICS)" since 1993. Currently Chairperson of Research Committee 28 on Social Stratification and Mobility of the International Sociological Association. Recipient of the Dr. Hendrik Muller Prize of the Dutch Royal Academy of Sciences and Arts 1997 and International Studies Special Interest Group of the American Education Research Association Award for Outstanding Paper of 1998. (b. 1946)
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Pedro Antonio Valdes-Sosa
Cuban Neuroscience Center, Havana, Cuba. peter@cneuro.edu.cu
Prof. PEDRO ANTONIO VALDES-SOSA, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016, General Vice-Director for Research of the Cuban Neuroscience Center, Havana, Cuba.
Philippe Veron
Meudon Observatory, Meudon, France
Professor PHILIPPE VERON, Sackler Scholar 1979/1980. Meudon Observatory, Meudon, France. (b. 1939)
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Asher Wolinsky
Department of Economics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA, a-wolinsky@northwestern.edu
Professor ASHER WOLINSKY, Sackler Visiting Scholar 2005/2006, 2006/2007. Professor of Economics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois since 1988. Alfred W. Chase Professor 1998-2002, Gordon Fulcher Professor 2002-present. Fellow, Econometric Society, 1991. Editorial boards: Econometrica, 1992-present; Games and Economic Behavior, 1992-present, Economic Theory, 1992-97; Journal of Economic Theory, 1993-present. Hebrew University, Economic Department, Lecturer, 1981-86, Senior Lecturer 1986-88.
Roger Waldinger
Deptartment of Sociology at University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
Professor ROGER WALDINGER, Sackler Lecturer 2009/2010. Distinguished Professor of Sociology at University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. He served as Chair of his department from 1999 to 2004 and as Director of the Lewis Center for Regional Policy from 1995 to 1998. He has worked on international migration throughout his career, writing on a broad set of topics, including immigrant entrepreneurship, labor markets, assimilation, the second generation, high-skilled immigration, immigration policy, and public opinion. The author of six books, most recently, How the Other Half Works: Immigration and the Social Organization of Labor (University of California Press, 2003), he is now writing a new book, tentatively entitled Foreign Detachment: America?s Immigrants and Their Homeland Connections. A 2008 Guggenheim Fellow, his research has been supported by grants from the Ford, Haines, Mellon, National Science, Sloan and Russell Sage Foundations.
Louis Waller
Dept. of Law, Monash University, Victoria, Australia, louis.waller@law.monash.edu.au
Professor LOUIS WALLER, Sackler Scholar 1985/1986. Sir Leo Cussen Chair of Law, Monash University, Victoria, Australia (retired in December 2000). He was appointed Emeritus Professor of Law, January 2001. Prof. Waller was appointed an Officer in the Order of Australia [AO], 26 January 1989. He served as Chairman, Standing Review and Advisory Committee on Infertility Victoria, 1985-1993; Inaugural Chairman, Infertility Treatment Authority, Victoria, June 1995-September 2001. Chairman, Ethics Committee, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, 1995-2000. Chairman, Appeals Committee, Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, 1997- to date. (b. 1935)
Prof. Joseph H. H. Weiler
University Professor and Director, Jean Monnet Center for International and Regional Economic Law & Justice, School of Law, New York University, New York, NY, WeilersOffice@nyu.edu; jhhweiler@gmail
Prof. J. H. H. WEILER, Sackler Lecturer 2012/2013, is University Professor and European Union Jean Monnet Chair at New York University Law School, New York City. He serves as Director of The Straus Institute for the Advanced Study of Law & Justice and Co-Director, with Moshe Halbertal, of the Tikvah Center for Law & Jewish Civilization. He was previously Professor of Law at Michigan Law School and then the Manley Hudson Professor of Law and the Jean Monnet Chair at Harvard Law School. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the Editor-in-Chief of The European Journal of International Law and the International Journal of Constitutional Law. His recent publications include Un-Europa Cristiana (translated into nine languages), The Constitution of Europe (translated into seven languages) and a novella, Der Fall Steinmann. (b. 1951)
Prof. Sheldon Weinbaum
CUNY Distinguished Professor, The City University of New York, New York , weinbaum@ccny.cuny.edu
Professor SHELDON WEINBAUM, Sackler Lecturer 2007/2008. CUNY Distinguished Professor of Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering, the City College of New York. His research interests include fluid dynamic and transport aspects of arterial disease, bioheat transfer, cellular mechanisms for mechanotransduction, bone fluid flow, microcirculatory exchange, renal transport and vulnerable plaque. Prof. Weinbaum is one of six living individuals who are members of all three U.S. National Academies: Engineering, Science, and Medicine. He is the only engineer to have received a Guggenheim Fellowship in the category molecular and cellular biology, 2002. Recipient: Davies Medal RPI (highest honor for engineering achievement) 2008; Beckman Distinguished Lecture, University of Illinois 2008; Inaugural Diversity Award, Biomedical Engineering Society 2009. (b. 1937)
Martin Weitzman
Dept. of Economics, Harvard University, USA, mweitzman@harvard.edu
Professor MARTIN L. WEITZMAN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1997/1998. Ernest E. Monrad Professor of Economics, Harvard University, Department of Economics, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1986 - ; Econometric Society, 1976 - . Consultant to The World Bank, Stanford Research Institute, International Monetary Fund, Agency for International Development, and Arthur D. Little, Co., Canadian Parliamentary Committee on Employment, Icelandic Committee on Natural Resources, National Academy Panel on Integrated Environmental and Economic Accounting. Associate Editor: Journal of Comparative Economics, Economic Letters, Journal of Japanese and International Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. (b. 1942)
Prof. Thomas A. Witten
Department of Physics, the Physical Sciences Collegiate Division and the James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois t-witten@uchicago.edu
Prof. Thomas a.Witten, Sackler Scholar 2012/2013, is in the Department of Physics, the Physical Sciences Collegiate Division and the James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois since 1989. He received a PhD in physics in 1971 from the University of California, San Diego. After postdoctoral fellowships at Princeton University and at Saclay, France, he joined the physics faculty at University of Michigan. He left Michigan in 1982 to join the Corporate Research lab of the Exxon Corporation. He is the winner of the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society in 2002 and was named the Lorentz Prof. in Leiden University in 2010. Prof. Witten is co-author with Phillip A. Pincus of the book, Structured Fluids: Polymers, Colloids, Surfactants, Oxford University Press 2004. Prof. Witten studies statistically structured forms of matter, such as diblock copolymer domain patterns, colloidal aggregates, and crumpled membranes. Witten is the co-discoverer of diffusion-limited aggregation (1981) and a co-inventor of the statistical theory of the polymer brush (1988). He is a co-discoverer of the stretching ridge in confined elastic sheets (b. 1995).
David Weitz

Director of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, USA, weitz@seas.harvard.edu


Prof. David A. Weitz, Sackler Lecturer 2016/2017, is Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Director of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center; Co-Director of the BASF Advanced Research Initiative; Associate Faculty Member at Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and a Member at Kavli Institute for Bionano Science & Technology.

 

Prof. Weitz received his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and then joined Exxon Research and Engineering Company, where he worked for nearly 18 years.  He then became a professor of physics at the University of Pennsylvania and moved to Harvard at the end of the last millennium as professor of physics and applied physics.  He leads a large and active group studying soft matter science with a focus on materials science, biophysics and microfluidics.  Several startup companies have come from his lab to use some of the technologies developed in his research.

Yifang Wang

Director, The Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China. yfwang@ihep.ac.cn


Prof. Yifang Wang, Sackler Lecturer 2018/2019, obtained his B.Sc. on nuclear physics in 1984 at the Nanjing University, China, and his Ph.D. on high energy physics in 1991, at the University of Florence, Italy. Subsequently, he worked at MIT and Stanford University in the US, and returned to China in 2001 as a researcher at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) of the Chinese Academy of Science in Beijing. Currently, he is the director of IHEP, a member of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and The Third World Academy of Sciences, and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

 

While in Europe and the US, Prof. Wang participated in many high energy physics experiments and was a member of the L3, AMS, Palo Verde and KamLAND collaborations. At IHEP, he led the design, construction and science effort of the BESIII experiment, at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, as the project manager and spokesperson. Recently, he proposed the Circular Electron-Positron Collider (CEPC) as the Higgs Factory for the future of high energy physics.

 

Prof. Wang initiated the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment in China and led its design, construction and science effort. This experiment established, for the first time, the neutrino mixing angle, theta-1-3, to be non-zero. Currently, he is leading the JUNO neutrino experiment to measure the neutrino mass hierarchy.

 

Prof. Wang published more than 300 scientific papers and is the chief editor of two books. He received numerous prizes and awards, among them are ZHOU Guangzhou Basic Science Award; Ho Leung Ho Lee Foundation for Scientific and Technological Progress Award; Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics; Panofsky Prize for Experimental Particle Physics; Nikkei Asia Prize for Science, Technology and Environment; and the Pontecorvo prize, for his achievement of the Daya Bay experiment.

 

Y
Arjun Yodh
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, USA. yodh@physics.upenn.edu
Prof. ARJUN G. YODH, Sackler Lecturer 2015/2016, Professor of Science and the Director of the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM) at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn).
Amnon Yariv
Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, USA, ayariv@caltech.edu
Professor AMNON YARIV is a Sackler Institute Member from Academic Year 1980/1981. Prof. Yariv is the Thomas G. Myers Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Prof. Yariv is a recipient of the Ives Medal (American Optical Society), Quantum Electronics Award (IEEE), Harvey Prize (Technion), and Pender Prize (University of Pennsylvania). He was the Chairman of the Board and founder of ORTEL Corporation and is the co-founder of a number of existing companies. Prof. Yariv is one of the world's leading experts in Quantum Electronics. His various texts on this subject are standard basic sources for the theory and applications of linear and nonlinear optics, lasers, quantum optics, and optical communication. (b. 1930)
Z
Marvin Zelen
Lemuel Shattuck Research Professor, of Statistical Science, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, zelen@hsph.harvard.edu
Prof. MARVIN ZELEN, Sackler Lecturer, is the Lemuel Shattuck Research Prof. of Statistical Science, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts since 2007. He has been a Prof. of Statistical Science at Harvard School of Public Health since 1977. He also founded and is the President of Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation which is a not-for - profit foundation devoted to the advancement of statistical science in clinical trials. He was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux II in 2003. He is the recipient of the Samuel S.Wilks Award (2006) from the American Statistical Association, was designated the Ronald Fisher Memorial Lecturer (2007) by the Committee of Presidents of the Statistical Societies and received the Emanuel & Carol Prize for Statistical Innovation (2008). In 2009, he was awarded the Medal of Honor by the American Cancer Society for his leadership in cancer clinical trials. He has received degrees from the City College of New York (B.S.), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (M.S.) and the American University (Ph. D.). In the past he has been Chair of the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health, Director of the Division of Biostatistical Science at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Chief of the Section on Applied Mathematics and Statistics at the National Cancer Institute, Other positions have been at the State University of New York at Buffalo and the National Bureau of Standards (renamed National Institutes of Standards and Technology). His current research interests are in models for the early detection of chronic diseases and inference in clinical trials. (b. 1927)
Marvin Zelen
Ewing Professor of Greek Language and Literature and Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University, Emerita, New Jersey, U.S.A fiz@princeton.edu
Prof. FROMA I. ZEITLIN, Sackler Scholar 2013/2014. She has published extensively in the field of Greek literature (epic, tragedy and comedy, prose fiction), paying special attention to gender and sexuality, problems of self-identity, the role of society and locality, and the dramatic functions of spectacle, visuality, and performance. Author of Under the Sign of the Shield: Semiotics and Aeschylus' Seven Against Thebes (1982: 2d ed. 2009) and Playing the Other: Gender and Society in Classical Greek Literature (1996), she also edited Mortals and Immortals: Selected Essays of Jean-Pierre Vernant (1991) and co-edited Nothing to Do with Dionysos? (1990) and Before Sexuality: The Construction of Sexuality in the Ancient Greek World (1990). She is currently working on a book, tentatively entitled, Vision, Figuration, and Image from Theater to Romance in the Ancient Greek World. She also founded and directed the Program in Judaic Studies at Princeton from 1996-2005. Additionally, for many years she has taught courses in her other specialty (Holocaust literature and film) under the auspices of Comparative Literature and has published several essays in this field as well. (b. 1933).
Alex Zunger
University of Colorado, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research Boulder, CO, Chief Scientist /Theory Energy Frontier Research Center on Inverse Design, , alex.zunger@colorado.edualex.zunger@gmail.com
Prof. ALEX ZUNGER, Sackler Scholar 2011/2012, is a Prof. at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His research field is Condensed Matter Theory of Real Materials. His main interest is electronic structure of solids, nanostructures, and renewable energy materials, as well as in the development of fundamental theoretical methods for describing the above, including the ''Inverse Band Structure''. Prof. Zunger has received the 2010 Tomassoni Physics Prize and the Science Medal of Scola Physica Romana (University of Rome), commemorating the contribution of E. Fermi to physics, 2009 Johannes Guttenberg award (University of Mainz). 2001 John Bardeen award of The Material Society for his ''seminal contributions to the theoretical understanding and prediction of spontaneous ordering in alloys''. 2001 Rahman Award of the American Physical Society ''for his pioneering work on the computational basis for first-principles electronic structure theory of solids.'' See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_Zunger. He was raised and educated in Israel, he received his Ph.D. from Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel, and did his postdoctoral research at Northwestern University, Physics Department. He then received an IBM Fellowship at the University of California-Berkeley, Physics Department. Prof. Zunger established the Solid State Theory group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, Colorado where he has trained over the years more than 70 post-doctoral fellows (see: http://www.sst.nrel.gov/personnel/pastmem.html ). The impact of Prof. Zunger's work is partially reflected by the number of citations that his papers: Institute of Scientific Information [ISI] Web of Science and by his high ''h-number'' (exceeding 90). His papers were cited more than 35,000 times, according to ISI. He is the author of the fifth-most-cited paper in the 110-year history of Physical Review (out of more than 350,000 articles published in that journal, (see arxiv.org/abs/physics/0407137). He has authored more than 600 articles in refereed journals, which includes over 150 articles in Physical Review Letters and Rapid Communications and three citation classics. ISI has declared him as the 39th most-cited physicist out of more than 500,000 physicists examined, based on publications in 1981-1997 in all branches of physics. He is an NREL Institute Research Fellow, a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and the Director of the newly established U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) ''Center for Inverse Design'' (see www.centerforinversedesign.org).
Deceased
John Bahcall
Professor JOHN BAHCALL, Sackler Institute Member, Academic Year 1993/1994. Professor of Physics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, USA. Member, National Academy of Science and American Academy of Arts and Science 1976. President, American Astronomical Society 1990-92. Recipient, NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal 1992; Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics, AAS and AIP 1994; Hans Bethe Prize of American Physical Society 1998; National Medal of Science 1998; Henry Norris Russell Lectureship 1999 of Institute for Advanced Study; Enrico Fermi Award 2003. (1934-2005)
Lipman Bers
Professor LIPMAN BERS, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1986/1987. Davies Emeritus Professor of Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. (1914-1993)
Richard Bersohn
Professor RICHARD BERSOHN , Sackler Scholar 1981/1982 and 1994/1995. Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. Member, Fellowship Committee of Alfred P. Sloan Foundation 1989-1994; American Academy of Arts & Sciences and National Academy of Sciences. Recipient Herbert Broida Prize in Chemical Physics by American Physical Society 1985. (1925 - 2003)
Ivan L. Bonta
Professor IVAN L. BONTA, Sackler Scholar 1983/1984. Chairman, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Elected Fellow of Sackler Institute of Advanced Studies, 1984. (1922 - 2007)
Eugene B. Brody
Professor EUGENE B. BRODY, MA, MD, DSc (Hon.), Sackler Scholar 1985/1986. Professor and Chairman Emeritus of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Senior Consultant, Past President and Past Secretary General, World Federation for Mental Health. Senior Advisor, Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma. Past Visiting Professor, Harvard University. Senior Associate, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Visiting Professor in many universities, but most recently at Harvard University. (1921 - 2010)
Bernard Budiansky
Professor BERNARD BUDIANSKY, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983. Gordon McKay Professor of Structural Mechanics, Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. (1925-1999)
Theodore H. Bullock
Professor THEODORE H. BULLOCK, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1987/1988. Professor of Neurosciences, Department of Neurosciences A-001, School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California, USA. Recipient of the Karl Spencer Lashley Award, American Philosphical Society 1968; Gerard Prize, Society for Neuroscience 1984. (1915 - 2005)
Sir Raymond Carr
Professor SIR RAYMOND CARR, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1989/1990. Warden of St. Antony's College, Oxford, England, 1968-1987. (retirement year) Historian of Modern Spain, Latin America, and Sweden. Fellow of the British Academy, 1978; Royal Historical Society, Royal Society of Literature; Distinguished Professor, Boston University, 1980; Knight Bachelor, 1987 New Year Honours; King Juan Carlos Professor of Spanish History, New York University,1992; Foreign Member, American Academy of Arts and Science, 2004. (1919 - 2008)
Professor Bernard D. Davis
Professor BERNARD D. DAVIS, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983. Bacterial Physiology Unit, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Awarded the Waxman Medal by The Society of American Bacteriologists. (1916 - 1994)
Pierre Dejours
Professor PIERRE DEJOURS, Sackler Scholar 1989/1990. Research Director of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Director of the Laboratoire de Physiologie Respiratoire, CNRS, Strasbourg, France. Recipient of the Legion d'Honneur 1975. Editor-in-Chief, Respiration Physiology until retired 1989. Member of the Académie des Sciences, 1991. (1922 - 2009)
Karl W. Deutsch
Professor KARL W. DEUTSCH, Sackler Scholar 1983/1984. Director, International Institute of Comparative Social Research, Berlin, Germany and Stanfield Professor of International Peace, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Decorated with the Grand Cross of Merit, German Federal Republic, 1976; recipient of Sumner Prize for Political Science, Harvard 1951; Sudeten German Prize of Culture 1977. (1912-1992)
Ernest Gellner
Professor ERNEST GELLNER, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983. Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, London School of Economics and Political Science, England. (1925-1995)
Abraham Goldstein
School of Law, Yale Univ., New Haven, USA Professor ABRAHAM S. GOLDSTEIN, Sackler Scholar 1985/1986. Sterling Professor of Law, Yale Law School, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. American Academy Arts and Science, 1975. (1925 - 2005)
Zvi Griliches
Professor ZVI GRILICHES, Sackler Scholar 1990/1991. Paul M. Warburg Professor of Economics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Chairman, Department of Economics, Harvard University 1980-1983. Elected Vice President of Executive Committee, American Economic Association 1984. (1930-1999)
Carl G. Hempel
Professor CARL G. HEMPEL, Sackler Scholar 1983/1984. Department of Philosophy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. (1905-1997)
Elie Kedourie
Professor ELIE KEDOURIE, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983. Department of Government, London School of Economics and Political Science, England. (1925-1984)
Harold Kelley
Department of Psychology Univ. of California at LA, USA Professor HAROLD H. KELLEY, Sackler Scholar 1985/1986. Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of California at Los Angeles, USA. Recipient of Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award, American Psychological Association 1971; Distinguished Scientific Award (simultaneously with John W. Thibaut) Society of Experimental Social Psychology 1981. (1921 - 2003)
Robert Koff
Performing Activities in Music, Brandeis Univ., USA Professor ROBERT KOFF, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983. Director of Performing Activities in Music, Artist in Residence, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA. Recorded extensively for RCA, Columbia and MGM; frequent TV and radio appearances. (1919 - 2005)
Rolf W. Landauer
Professor ROLF W. LANDAUER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1984/1985. I.B.M. Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, USA. (1927 - 1999)
Harry Lipkin
Professor HARRY LIPKIN, Sackler Scholar 1991/1992 Professor of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. Recipient of Kaplun Prize, 1973; Rotschild Prize 1980, Wigner Medal 2002 and EMET Prize 2009. (1921 - 2015)
Robert Sabatino Lopez
Professor ROBERT SABATINO LOPEZ, Sackler Scholar 1981/1982. Department of History, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Foreign News Editor CBS New York 1944 - 1945. (1910 - 1986)
Bimal K. Matilal
Professor BIMAL K. MATILAL, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1984/1985. Spalding Professor of Eastern Religions and Ethics, All Souls College, Oxford University, U.K. from 1977-1991. Special interests: Indian philosophical tradition, fluent in Sanskrit, mathematics, and logic. (1935-1991)
Miroslav Marcovich
Professor MIROSLAV MARCOVICH, Sackler Scholar 1990/1991. Professor of Classics and Senior Scholar, University of Illinois at Urbana, Urbana, Illinois, U.S.A. Founding and Present Editor, Illinois Classical Studies; Guggenheim Fellow 1981 & 1984; N.E.H. Fellow 1990/1991; Einstein Fellow, Israel Academy of Sciences (1990, declined). (1919-2001)
Kevin Charles Marshall
School of Microbiology, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia. Professor KEVIN CHARLES MARSHALL, Sackler Scholar 1987/1988. School of Microbiology, University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia. (1932 - 2010)
Emanuel Margoliash
Professor EMANUEL MARGOLIASH, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983 and 1988/1989. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Evanston, Illinois, USA. Member, National Academy of Science, USA. (1920 - 2008)
Arthur Taylor von Mehren
Professor ARTHUR TAYLOR VON MEHREN, Sackler Scholar 1986/1987. Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. (1922-2007)
Nahum N. Meiman
Professor NAHUM N. MEIMAN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1987/1988. Past Member, Academic Year 1987/1988. Former, Head of the Mathematical Laboratory, Institute of Physical Problems and Head of Mathematical Group of Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, USSR. (1917 - 2001)
Julius Moravcsik
Professor JULIUS M. MORAVCSIK, Sackler Scholar 1987/1988 and 1994/1995. Department of Philosophy, Stanford University, California, USA. Chairman of Philosophy Department 1972-1975 and 1983-1986; President of American Philosophical Association (Pacific Division) 1987-1988; Broad of Trustees, American Society for Aesthetics, 1989-1992. Elected to be an external member of the Hungarian Academy of Arts and Sciences and won the Humboldt Prize in 2002. (1931 - 2009)
Martin Ostwald
Professor MARTIN OSTWALD, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1993/1994 and 2002/2003. William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor Emeritus of Classics, Swarthmore College, Professor Emeritus of Classical Studies (Graduate Group), The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. President, American Philological Association; Recipient, Goodwin Award of Merit of American Philological Association 1990; Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences 1991 and Member, American Philosophical Society 1993. Editor, Cambridge Ancient History, 1976-1992, and his main scholarly interests are in the field of ancient Greek political thought and institutions. (1922 - 2010)
Tahsin Ozguc
Near Eastern Archaeology Univ. of Ankara, Turkey Professor Dr. TAHSIN OZGUC, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1986/1987. Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology, University of Ankara, Ankara, Turkey. (1916 - 2005)
Norman F. Ramsey
, Lyman Physics Laboratory, Emeritus Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Professor NORMAN F. RAMSEY, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1995/1996. Higgins Professor of Physics, Lyman Physics Laboratory, Emeritus Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Recipient, Nobel Prize in Physics, 1989; Einstein Award, National Medal of Science. President of American Physical Society, 1978-1979; and Universities Research Association, 1966-1982, which operates Fermi Lab; and Chaired Governing Board of the American Institute of Physics, 1981-1985. Honoris Causa, Harvard University 2006. (1915 - 2011)
Samuel I. Rapaport
Hematology/ Oncology Division, University of California at San Diego, USA. Professor SAMUEL I. RAPAPORT, Sackler Scholar 1982/1983. Hematology/ Oncology Division, University of California at San Diego, USA. Recipient of Distinquished Medical Alumnus Award, University of Southern California School of Medicine 1976; Robert P. Grant Medal, International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis 1991; John Phillips Memorial Award for Outstanding Work in Clinical Medicine, American College of Physicians 1996. Chair, Thrombosis Council, American Heart Association, 1995. Elected Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2008. (1921 - 2011)
Marshall Rosenbluth
Professor MARSHALL ROSENBLUTH, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1985/1986. Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, USA. Recipient of 1985 Enrico Fermi Award (simultaneously with Norman C Rasmussen). Fellow, American Physical Society; Member, National Academy of Science. (1927-2003)
Atle Selberg
Dept. of Mathematics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, USA Professor ATLE SELBERG, Sackler Scholar 1991/1992. Professor of Mathematics, The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey, USA. Recipient of the Fields Medal and Prize, 1950 and the Wolf Prize, Jeruasalem, Israel 1986. Honorary Member London Mathematial Society and Honorary Fellow of Tate Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay, India. (1917 - 2007)
Herbert Stein
Professor HERBERT STEIN, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1997/1998. American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC. Member, President's Council of Economic Advisers, 1969-71; and Chairman under Presidents Nixon and Ford, 1972-74. Recipient, Frank E. Seidman Award in Political Economy, 1989. (1916-1999)
Edward Teller
Professor EDWARD TELLER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1979/1980 and 1982/1983. University of California, Livermore, California, USA. Recipient of Joseph Priestly Memorial Award, Dickinson College 1957; Albert Einstein Award 1958; Gen. Donovan Meml. Award 1959; Midwest Research Inst. Award 1960; Research Inst. Am. Living History Award 1960; Golden Plate Award 1961; Thomas E. White and Enrico Fermi Awards 1962; Robins Award of Am. 1963; Harvey Prize, Israel Inst. of Tech. 1975; Albert Einstein Award 1977; awarded the Semmelweiss Medal 1977; National Medal of Science; and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 2003. (1908-2003)
Archibald Paton Thornton
Dept. of History, Univ. of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Professor ARCHIBALD PATON THORNTON, Sackler Scholar 1985/1986. Professor of History, University College, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (b. 1921)
Amos Tversky
Professor AMOS TVERSKY, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1992/1993. Sackler Institute Member, Academic Year 1995/96. Davis-Brack Professor of Behavorial Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. Member of Honorary Society of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 1980 and National Academy of Science 1985. (1937 - 1996)
John Archibald Wheeler
Professor JOHN ARCHIBALD WHEELER, Sackler Visiting Scholar 1996/1997. Professor Emeritus, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey and Professor Emeritus, University of Texas, Austin, Texas. Recipient of Wolf Foundation Prize in Physics, 1997. (1911-2008)
Pierre-Gilles de Gennes
Professor PIERRE-GILLES de GENNES, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Institut Curie, Paris, France. Prof. G.P. de Gennes was the Director, Ecole de Physique et Chimie, Paris from 1976-2002. Recipient of numerous awards: the Nobel Prize in Physics, 1991; Holweck Prize from the joint French and British Physical Society; the Ampere Prize, French Academy of Science; the Gold Medal from the French CNRS; the Matteuci Medal, Italian Academy; the Harvey Prize, Israel; the Wolf Prize, Israel; The Lorentz Medal, Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences; and polymer awards from both APS and ACS. Member of the French Academy of Sciences, the Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences, USA. (1932-2007)
Hilary Putnam
Professor HILARY PUTNAM, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. Cogan Research Professor, Department of Philosophy, Emeritus, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the British Academy, Institut de France (Academie des Sciences Politique et Morale) and fellowships: the Guggenheim Foundation, National Science Foundation and National Endowment for the Humanities. Member of the American Philosophical Society for the Advancement of Useful Knowledge. Past Presidents of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division; Philosophy of Science Association, and the Association for Symbolic Logic. Honorary Doctorate, Tel Aviv University. Recipient: The Rolf Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, 2011. (1926 - 2016)
Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi
Professor YOSEF HAYIM YERUSHALMI, Sackler Scholar 2004/2005. Salo Wittmayer Baron Professor of Jewish History, Culture and Society; 1980-2005 and Director of the Center for Israel and Jewish Studies at Columbia University, 1980-2005. President, Leo Baeck Institute, New York from 1987 - 1991. Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; the American Academy for Jewish Research, Center for Israel and Jewish Studies; and an Honorary Member, Portuguese Academy of History in Lisbon. His scholarly interests range from medieval through modern times, with special emphasis on Spanish and Portuguese Jewry, modern German Jewry, Jewish historiography and the history of psychoanalysis. Recipient of the National Jewish Book Award, 1983, 1992 and the Dr. Leopold-Lucas Prize, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany 2005. The Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi Chair (established in 2005) augments the study of modern Israeli history, politics and society at Columbia University and brings Israeli scholars to campus each academic year. (1932 - 2009)


Professor JEAN-PIERRE de GENNES, Sackler Lecturer 2005/2006. Institut Curie, Paris, France. Prof. P.-G. de Gennes was the Director, Ecole de Physique et Chimie, Paris from 1976-2002. Recipient of numerous awards: the Nobel Prize in Physics, 1991; Holweck Prize from the joint French and British Physical Society; the Ampere Prize, French Academy of Science; the Gold Medal from the French CNRS; the Matteuci Medal, Italian Academy; the Harvey Prize, Israel; the Wolf Prize, Israel; The Lorentz Medal, Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences; and polymer awards from both APS and ACS. Member of the French Academy of Sciences, the Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences, USA. (b. 1932) Reference: Nobel Prize http://nobelprize.org/physics/laureates/1991/gennes-bio.html



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